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Women in Colonial America
Student's name
Professor's Name
Institution Affiliation
Due Date
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Women in Colonial America
Women played different roles during the colonial period. Predominantly women helped
in the domestic chores. Girls learned from their mothers how to cook, weave, and perform
routine tasks at home. However, due to the differences in geographies and the social setups,
different regions had some unique women experiences that differentiated them from the other
areas.
Depending on the ethnic groups inhabiting the region, women had varied experiences
from one colony to another during the colonial era. Up to the late 1700s, women in America had
limited rights. Presumably, we can say that the women had no practical rights. Women could not
do anything without the approval of men (Mintx, 1989). In a married family setup, the men were
the sole representatives of the family. Women were unable to make decisions without consulting
men. Predominantly women were expected to be housewives, give birth, and raise their children.
New England colonies
In the New England colonies, during the 1700s, the freedoms and responsibilities given
to the white women varied depending on the family's socioeconomic background. The girls from
the elite social class had access to better services and informal education, while the girls from
lower social status had limited access to education. Girls and ladies from privileged families
were taught how to perform domestic tasks by their mothers. These tasks included sewing
clothes, cooking, among others. Girls, however, had limited space to engage in formal education
like reading and writing. These tasks were reserved for men.
In provincial elections, women had no right to vote for their leaders. This right was
reserved for men. The women also were not allowed to engage in political activities. This
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infringed the political space for women as they also did not hold any leadership positions in
society. The rules, therefore, were made by the men and were binding to the women. This
resulted in lots of oppressive rules on women that were a barrier to the development of women.
Women were equally not allowed to own property. The properties in the family belonged
to men who had absolute authority over their uses. Women could not own property despite also
contributing to the acquisition of the family properties. Women also had no formal employment.
They used to remain back at home when the men went to work on industrial farms. This was
attributed to the lack of formal education among the girls and women, making them less skilled
and qualified to take these tasks.
Women engaged in early marriages in the puritan society. Girls got married in their early
twenties. In marriage, the girls gave birth at an interval of about two years. Due to the early
marriage and high frequency of childbirth, the women had many children and raised large
families.
The Puritan Lawmakers were worried that by recognizing the respective property rights
of the women, the would arise family conflicts among the married persons. They were wary that
the unity of marriage would be undermined due to the conflicting interests between the husbands
and their wives. Due to this, women gave up their property rights to me when married. However,
the law secured the provision for the widows to have property rights. Women adulterers were
given corporal punishments and whipped in public. They were viewed to be morally weaker in
society than men. Divorce, however, was rare, and marriages were held by the strict societal
values that imposed shame on single or divorced women. As a result, the women stuck in their
marriages whichever situation they found themselves, however oppressive the wedding was. In
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4
Philadelphia and New York, almshouses were built in the 1730s to aid widows and orphans in
society (Huey, 2001).
The Half-Way Covenant enhanced the church membership rights by increasing the
number of women allowed to participate in Congregational activities in the church. The
Witchcraft Persecutions Persecutions and Salem Witch Trials in New England were thought
about the widening social separation of New England and the dread of strict conservatives that
the Puritan legacy was being overshadowed.
While keeping up significant roles inside the family, Puritan culture in New England
stifled ladies' legitimate rights. Outside bringing up kids, ladies stayed voteless, voiceless, and
undetectable in the public arena as they did not have any political importance. Particularly in the
Puritan culture, ladies were relied upon to go about as kid carriers as they were seen truly more
vulnerable than men, yet profoundly less significant. The puritan culture was incredibly exacting,
particularly with ladies. On the off chance that ladies were discovered having sexual relations
outside of marriage, they were everlastingly marked with discolored notoriety and compelled to
wear an enormous "A."
People like Anne Hutchinson contended the deception of the Puritan tenet of destiny,
contending that on the off chance that one was really saved from birth, he would have no
motivation to observe the laws of one or the other God or man. Not exclusively was Anne
Hutchinson, a lady who stood up against the authority of the Puritan culture. She contended that
she had gotten this disclosure straightforwardly from God, although ladies in the general public
were viewed as not as much as men (Reis, 1999).
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Ladies and kids started to acquire more prominent profound importance through
improved arrangements, such as the Half Way Covenant, giving ladies a chance to practice more
noteworthy social positions. The Salem Witch Trials addressed the social separation of ladies
and the Puritan dread of ladies' developing force and authority. An aftereffect of the changing
social force of ladies, the Salem Witch preliminaries mirrored the Puritan culture's awkward
progress from more customary jobs to more prominent economic wellbeing.
Middle Colonies
The middle colonies experience a Culture that was a blend between New England and
southern plantation society. Women performed housework, raised the children, and making
weaves and spins. The middle economies viewed women as homemakers who cooked meals,
cleaned, and doctored their families. Women made some household goods for use within the
family and sold others. The women took care of animals and tended the kitchen gardens. Women
also maintained fire, carried water gathered fruits and vegetables for daily meals.
While the men encountered a surprising level of popularity-based control, ladies could, in
any case, not vote and also couldn't attend college. Young ladies became spouses and moms who
dealt with the farm and in the house. Some became workers, midwives, and tavernkeepers, or
school paramours.
While financially, socially, and politically, the Middle Colonies portrayed a blend of New
England freedom and essentialness mixed with Southern nobility, ladies' legal and monetary
privileges between the three districts didn't change.
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6
Ladies all through the colonies, while assuming a pivotal part in supporting the family
and bringing up kids, they needed legitimate property rights, casting a ballot, separation, and
battling against segregation and discrimination. Despite the fact that socially the center states
gave more restricted opportunity and individual freedom, ladies actually came up short on men's
uniformity and legitimate regard.
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7
Reference
Huey, P. R. (2001). The almshouse in Dutch and English colonial North America and its
precedent in the old world: historical and archaeological evidence. International Journal
of Historical Archaeology, 5(2), 123-154.
Mintz, S., & Kellogg, S. (1989). Domestic revolutions: A social history of American family life.
Simon and Schuster.
Reis, E. (1999). Damned women: sinners and witches in Puritan New England. Cornell
University Press.
Corbett, P. Scott, Janssen, Volker, U.S. History, url:
https://cnx.org/contents/p7ovuIkl@9.1:gMXC1GEM@7/Introduction

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Women in Colonial America Student's name Professor's Name Institution Affiliation Due Date 2 Women in Colonial America Women played different roles during the colonial period. Predominantly women helped in the domestic chores. Girls learned from their mothers how to cook, weave, and perform routine tasks at home. However, due to the differences in geographies and the social setups, different regions had some unique women experiences that differentiated them from the other areas. Depending on the ethnic groups inhabiting the region, women had varied experiences from one colony to another during the colonial era. Up to the late 1700s, women in America had limited rights. Presumably, we can say that the women had no practical rights. Women could not do anything without the approval of men (Mintx, 1989). In a married family setup, the men were the sole representatives of the family. Women were unable to make decisions without consulting men. Predominantly women were expected to be housewives, give birth, and raise their children. New England colonies In the New England colonies, during the 1700s, the freedoms and responsibilities given to the white women varied depending on the family's socioeconomic background. The girls from the elite social class had access to better services and informal education, while the girls from lower social status had limited access to education. Girls and ladies from privileged families were taught how to perform domestic tasks by their mothers. These tasks included sewing clothes, cooking, among others. Girls, however, had limited space to engage in formal education like reading and writing. These tasks were reserved for men. In provincial elections, women had no right to vote for their leaders. This right was reserved for men. The women also were not allowed to engage in political activities. This 3 infringed the political space for women as they also did not hold any leadership positions in society. The rules, therefore, were made by the men and were binding to the women. This resulted in lots of oppressive rules on women that were a barrier to the development of women. Women were equally not allowed to own property. The properties in the family belonged to men who had absolute authority over their uses. Women could not own property despite also contributing to the acquisition of the family properties. Women also had no formal employment. They used to remain back at home when the men went to work on industrial farms. This was attributed to the lack of formal education among the girls and women, making them less skilled and qualified to take these tasks. Women engaged in early marriages in the puritan society. Girls got married in their early twenties. In marriage, the girls gave birth at an interval of about two years. Due to the early marriage and high frequency of childbirth, the women had many children and raised large families. The Puritan Lawmakers were worried that by recognizing the respective property rights of the women, the would arise family conflicts among the married persons. They were wary that the unity of marriage would be undermined due to the conflicting interests between the husbands and their wives. Due to this, women gave up their property rights to me when married. However, the law secured the provision for the widows to have property rights. Women adulterers were given corporal punishments and whipped in public. They were viewed to be morally weaker in society than men. Divorce, however, was rare, and marriages were held by the strict societal values that imposed shame on single or divorced women. As a result, the women stuck in their marriages whichever situation they found themselves, however oppressive the wedding was. In 4 Philadelphia and New York, almshouses were built in the 1730s to aid widows and orphans in society (Huey, 2001). The Half-Way Covenant enhanced the church membership rights by increasing the number of women allowed to participate in Congregational activities in the church. The Witchcraft Persecutions Persecutions and Salem Witch Trials in New England were thought about the widening social separation of New England and the dread of strict conservatives that the Puritan legacy was being overshadowed. While keeping up significant roles inside the family, Puritan culture in New England stifled ladies' legitimate rights. Outside bringing up kids, ladies stayed voteless, voiceless, and undetectable in the public arena as they did not have any political importance. Particularly in the Puritan culture, ladies were relied upon to go about as kid carriers as they were seen truly more vulnerable than men, yet profoundly less significant. The puritan culture was incredibly exacting, particularly with ladies. On the off chance that ladies were discovered having sexual relations outside of marriage, they were everlastingly marked with discolored notoriety and compelled to wear an enormous "A." People like Anne Hutchinson contended the deception of the Puritan tenet of destiny, contending that on the off chance that one was really saved from birth, he would have no motivation to observe the laws of one or the other God or man. Not exclusively was Anne Hutchinson, a lady who stood up against the authority of the Puritan culture. She contended that she had gotten this disclosure straightforwardly from God, although ladies in the general public were viewed as not as much as men (Reis, 1999). 5 Ladies and kids started to acquire more prominent profound importance through improved arrangements, such as the Half Way Covenant, giving ladies a chance to practice more noteworthy social positions. The Salem Witch Trials addressed the social separation of ladies and the Puritan dread of ladies' developing force and authority. An aftereffect of the changing social force of ladies, the Salem Witch preliminaries mirrored the Puritan culture's awkward progress from more customary jobs to more prominent economic wellbeing. Middle Colonies The middle colonies experience a Culture that was a blend between New England and southern plantation society. Women performed housework, raised the children, and making weaves and spins. The middle economies viewed women as homemakers who cooked meals, cleaned, and doctored their families. Women made some household goods for use within the family and sold others. The women took care of animals and tended the kitchen gardens. Women also maintained fire, carried water gathered fruits and vegetables for daily meals. While the men encountered a surprising level of popularity-based control, ladies could, in any case, not vote and also couldn't attend college. Young ladies became spouses and moms who dealt with the farm and in the house. Some became workers, midwives, and tavernkeepers, or school paramours. While financially, socially, and politically, the Middle Colonies portrayed a blend of New England freedom and essentialness mixed with Southern nobility, ladies' legal and monetary privileges between the three districts didn't change. 6 Ladies all through the colonies, while assuming a pivotal part in supporting the family and bringing up kids, they needed legitimate property rights, casting a ballot, separation, and battling against segregation and discrimination. Despite the fact that socially the center states gave more restricted opportunity and individual freedom, ladies actually came up short on men's uniformity and legitimate regard. 7 Reference Huey, P. R. (2001). The almshouse in Dutch and English colonial North America and its precedent in the old world: historical and archaeological evidence. International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 5(2), 123-154. Mintz, S., & Kellogg, S. (1989). Domestic revolutions: A social history of American family life. Simon and Schuster. Reis, E. (1999). Damned women: sinners and witches in Puritan New England. Cornell University Press. Corbett, P. Scott, Janssen, Volker, U.S. History, url: https://cnx.org/contents/p7ovuIkl@9.1:gMXC1GEM@7/Introduction Name: Description: ...
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