Showing Page:
1/7
Glossary
Project Management
Terms and Definitions
Course 2
A
Adoption: Refers to how the customer uses and adapts a product or service without any
issues
Asana: A work management platform that helps teams plan and coordinate their work;
useful for building project plans, assigning tasks, automating workflows, tracking progress,
and communicating with stakeholders
B
Benchmark: A point of reference
Benefits: Expected gains of a project
Budget: An estimate of the amount of money a project will cost to complete
Business case: The reason for initiating a project
Showing Page:
2/7
C
Collaboration tools: Tools used to quickly and efficiently check in with team members on
questions, comments, and other topics related to a project
Conditional formatting: A feature that adds automatic color coding to cells in a
spreadsheet
Cost-benefit analysis: The process of adding up the expected value of a projectthe
benefitsand comparing them to the dollar costs
Customers: The people who will get some value from a successfully-landed project
D
Data validation: A feature that adds dropdown lists to cells in a spreadsheet
Deliverable: A tangible outcome from a project; what gets produced or presented at the
end of a task, event, or process
Docs: A digital word processing application
E
Engagement: Refers to how often or meaningful customer interaction and participation is
over time
Showing Page:
3/7
F
Function: A feature that generates formulas which can be used to manipulate data and
perform calculations in a spreadsheet
G
Gantt chart: A horizontal bar chart that illustrates a project’s tasks, with clear breakdowns
of who’s responsible for the work and when those tasks are due
H
Header: The top cell or cells in a column in a spreadsheet
I
Influence: Measures how much power a stakeholder has and how much the stakeholder’s
actions affect the project outcome
Initiation: The first phase within the project life cycle, followed by planning, executing, and
closing
In-scope: Tasks that are included in the project plan and contribute to the project’s goal
Intangible benefits: Gains that are not measurable or quantifiable, such as customer or
employee satisfaction or brand recognition
Intangible costs: A cost that cannot easily be quantified, such as loss of employee morale
or brand damage.
Showing Page:
4/7
Interest: Refers to how much the needs of the stakeholder will be affected by project
outcomes
K
Key results: The part of an OKR that describes measurable outcomes that objectively
define when the objective has been met
Key stakeholders: The people with the highest amount of influence on and interest in a
project; also called "key players"
L
Land: To measure the success of a project using the success criteria established at the
outset of the project
Launch: To deliver the final result of a project to the client or user
M
Materials: Items needed to help get the project done
Metrics: Data used to measure something, like numbers or figures
O
Objective: The part of an OKR that defines what needs to be achieved and describes a
Showing Page:
5/7
desired outcome
Objectives and key results (OKRs): A combination of a goal and a metric to determine a
measurable outcome
Out-of-scope: Tasks that are not included in the project plan and don’t contribute to the
project’s goal
P
Pivot table: A basic analysis tool used to summarize data and show the relationships
between data points, making it easier to understand the information contained in a
spreadsheet
Power grid: A two-by-two grid used for conducting a stakeholder analysis; shows
stakeholder interest in the project versus their influence over the project
Primary stakeholders: People who will benefit directly from a project’s success
Productivity tools: Tools used to manage project tasks, including word processing
software, spreadsheets, and presentations
Project charter: A document that clearly defines the key details of a project
Project goal: The desired outcome of a project
Project manager: The person who plans, organizes, and oversees the whole project
Project proposal: Documentation written at the beginning of a project; kicks off the
initiation phase by influencing and persuading the company to move forward with the
project
Project sponsor: The person who’s accountable for the project and who ensures the
project delivers the agreed-upon business benefits
Showing Page:
6/7
R
RACI chart: A visual that helps to define roles and responsibilities for individuals or teams
to ensure work gets done efficiently; lists who is "responsible," "accountable," "consulted,"
and "informed" for project tasks
Return on investment (ROI): A metric used to calculate the return on an investment
relative to its cost.
Resources: The budget, people, materials, and other items needed for a project
S
Scheduling and work management software: Tools used for assigning tasks to multiple
teammates and for tracking and visualizing progress; most useful for bigger projects with a
larger number of tasks and a bigger team of people to manage
Scope: The boundaries of a project; an agreed-upon understanding as to what is included
or excluded from a project
Scope creep: Changes, growth, and uncontrolled factors that affect a project’s scope at any
point after the project begins
Scope management: Understanding and negotiating how changes will be evaluated,
accepted, and performed
Silo: A situation in which the knowledge and responsibility for a task falls on one person
Secondary stakeholders: People who are indirectly impacted by a project’s success
Slides: Google’s digital presentation application
SMART goals: A method to evaluate goals; states that goals should be "specific,"
"measurable," "attainable," "relevant," and "time-bound"
Showing Page:
7/7
Spreadsheet: A tool used for organizing, transforming, visualizing, and manipulating
information; useful for a wide range of tasks, such as creating timelines, building charts,
managing budgets, and tracking tasks
Stakes: The important parts of a business, situation, or project that might be at risk if
something goes wrong
Stakeholders: Anyone involved in the project who has a vested interest in the project’s
success
Stakeholder analysis: A visual representation of all the stakeholders that illustrates which
stakeholders are taking on which responsibilities; also called “stakeholder mapping”
Stakeholder buy-in: The process of involving stakeholders in decision-making to hopefully
reach a broader consensus on the organization's future
Steering committee: The most senior decision-making body on any project; they have the
authority to make changes to the budget and approve updates to the timeline or scope
Success criteria: The standards that measure how successful a project was in reaching its
goals
T
Team members: The people doing the day-to-day work and making the project happen
Tools: Aids that make it easier for a project manager or team to manage resources and
organize work
Triple constraint: The combination of the three most significant restrictions of any project:
scope, time, and cost.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Glossary Project Management Terms and Definitions Course 2 A Adoption: Refers to how the customer uses and adapts a product or service without any issues Asana: A work management platform that helps teams plan and coordinate their work; useful for building project plans, assigning tasks, automating workflows, tracking progress, and communicating with stakeholders B Benchmark: A point of reference Benefits: Expected gains of a project Budget: An estimate of the amount of money a project will cost to complete Business case: The reason for initiating a project C Collaboration tools: Tools used to quickly and efficiently check in with team members on questions, comments, and other topics related to a project Conditional formatting: A feature that adds automatic color coding to cells in a spreadsheet Cost-benefit analysis: The process of adding up the expected value of a project—the benefits—and comparing them to the dollar costs Customers: The people who will get some value from a successfully-landed project D Data validation: A feature that adds dropdown lists to cells in a spreadsheet Deliverable: A tangible outcome from a project; what gets produced or presented at the end of a task, event, or process Docs: A digital word processing application E Engagement: Refers to how often or meaningful customer interaction and participation is over time F Function: A feature that generates formulas which can be used to manipulate data and perform calculations in a spreadsheet G Gantt chart: A horizontal bar chart that illustrates a project’s tasks, with clear breakdowns of who’s responsible for the work and when those tasks are due H Header: The top cell or cells in a column in a spreadsheet I Influence: Measures how much power a stakeholder has and how much the stakeholder’s actions affect the project outcome Initiation: The first phase within the project life cycle, followed by planning, executing, and closing In-scope: Tasks that are included in the project plan and contribute to the project’s goal Intangible benefits: Gains that are not measurable or quantifiable, such as customer or employee satisfaction or brand recognition Intangible costs: A cost that cannot easily be quantified, such as loss of employee morale or brand damage. Interest: Refers to how much the needs of the stakeholder will be affected by project outcomes K Key results: The part of an OKR that describes measurable outcomes that objectively define when the objective has been met Key stakeholders: The people with the highest amount of influence on and interest in a project; also called "key players" L Land: To measure the success of a project using the success criteria established at the outset of the project Launch: To deliver the final result of a project to the client or user M Materials: Items needed to help get the project done Metrics: Data used to measure something, like numbers or figures O Objective: The part of an OKR that defines what needs to be achieved and describes a desired outcome Objectives and key results (OKRs): A combination of a goal and a metric to determine a measurable outcome Out-of-scope: Tasks that are not included in the project plan and don’t contribute to the project’s goal P Pivot table: A basic analysis tool used to summarize data and show the relationships between data points, making it easier to understand the information contained in a spreadsheet Power grid: A two-by-two grid used for conducting a stakeholder analysis; shows stakeholder interest in the project versus their influence over the project Primary stakeholders: People who will benefit directly from a project’s success Productivity tools: Tools used to manage project tasks, including word processing software, spreadsheets, and presentations Project charter: A document that clearly defines the key details of a project Project goal: The desired outcome of a project Project manager: The person who plans, organizes, and oversees the whole project Project proposal: Documentation written at the beginning of a project; kicks off the initiation phase by influencing and persuading the company to move forward with the project Project sponsor: The person who’s accountable for the project and who ensures the project delivers the agreed-upon business benefits R RACI chart: A visual that helps to define roles and responsibilities for individuals or teams to ensure work gets done efficiently; lists who is "responsible," "accountable," "consulted," and "informed" for project tasks Return on investment (ROI): A metric used to calculate the return on an investment relative to its cost. Resources: The budget, people, materials, and other items needed for a project S Scheduling and work management software: Tools used for assigning tasks to multiple teammates and for tracking and visualizing progress; most useful for bigger projects with a larger number of tasks and a bigger team of people to manage Scope: The boundaries of a project; an agreed-upon understanding as to what is included or excluded from a project Scope creep: Changes, growth, and uncontrolled factors that affect a project’s scope at any point after the project begins Scope management: Understanding and negotiating how changes will be evaluated, accepted, and performed Silo: A situation in which the knowledge and responsibility for a task falls on one person Secondary stakeholders: People who are indirectly impacted by a project’s success Slides: Google’s digital presentation application SMART goals: A method to evaluate goals; states that goals should be "specific," "measurable," "attainable," "relevant," and "time-bound" Spreadsheet: A tool used for organizing, transforming, visualizing, and manipulating information; useful for a wide range of tasks, such as creating timelines, building charts, managing budgets, and tracking tasks Stakes: The important parts of a business, situation, or project that might be at risk if something goes wrong Stakeholders: Anyone involved in the project who has a vested interest in the project’s success Stakeholder analysis: A visual representation of all the stakeholders that illustrates which stakeholders are taking on which responsibilities; also called “stakeholder mapping” Stakeholder buy-in: The process of involving stakeholders in decision-making to hopefully reach a broader consensus on the organization's future Steering committee: The most senior decision-making body on any project; they have the authority to make changes to the budget and approve updates to the timeline or scope Success criteria: The standards that measure how successful a project was in reaching its goals T Team members: The people doing the day-to-day work and making the project happen Tools: Aids that make it easier for a project manager or team to manage resources and organize work Triple constraint: The combination of the three most significant restrictions of any project: scope, time, and cost. Name: Description: ...
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.
Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4