Showing Page:
1/9
Summarizing Content Using Cornell Notes
To successfully master today’s core content, English Language Learners and struggling
students require additional literacy and fluency support. One of the challenges of English
language development (ELD) is grasping the skill of summarization. This abstract activity not
only requires a good understanding of written and spoken English, but also calls for adequate
comprehension of ideas.
One simple yet powerful tool for English language learners to learn to summarize content is
called Cornell Notes. It enables them to synthesize content knowledge and organize their
understanding into complete sentences. The technique incorporates seven simple steps that
help students to take notes, prioritize information, and restate key points with supporting details.
FOUR PARTS OF THE CORNELL WAY
PART I. NOTE-TAKING: Reading or listening to information for the first time while
jotting down and organizing key points to be used later as a learning tool.
C- Create Format
Step 1: Create Cornell notes format and complete heading.
Topic/Objective:
-Students will write
the topic of
the day’s lesson.
Name:
Class/Period:
Date:
Essential Question(s): Learners will turn the content standard into a
question.
Also, they will create the the ELD standard into a question.
Showing Page:
2/9
Questions:
Notes:
-Students will take notes while listening to a lecture, watching
a video clip, solving a math problem, participating in a
science lab, or engaging in a cooperative activity.
-Learners must take notes in their own words or paraphrase
what they hear.
-Students need to leave spaces for revisions by skipping
lines between ideas.
-Scholars should abbreviate words and use symbols, when
appropriate (teacher can provide abbreviations and symbols
that are appropriate to content).
-Students should use indentation to show relationships
between ideas.
-Teachers can show students how to distinguish between
important information vs. trivial information.
-Learners must recognize cues, “This is important…” “This
may be on the next test…” and repeated information.
PART II. NOTE - MAKING: Within 24 hours of taking notes, students need to
revise their notes, generate questions, and use collaboration to create meaning.
R - Review and Revise
Step 3: Review and revise notes on the right side of the note paper.
Questions:
Notes:
N-Note Key
Students must revise their notes using the following checklist:
Showing Page:
3/9
Ideas
Step 4: Note key
ideas to create ?’s.
-Use inquiry on the left
side that connects to the
key ideas.
-Review the main ideas
highlighted on the right
side.
-Determine the purpose
of the lecture, reading, or
activity.
-Read aloud the
highlighted main ideas on
the page, and create a
question that is answered
with this main idea.
-Develop questions on
the left side that identify
the main ideas on the
right side by interacting
with the information
through the revision
process in Step 3
1, 2 3…
A, B, C….
1.Number the notes for each concept or
main idea
2.Circle key terms in pencil.
Main Idea
3.Highlight or underline main ideas in
pencil
4.Fill in gaps of missing information
and/or reword/ paraphrase in red
Unimportant
5.Delete/ cross out unimportant
information by drawing a line through it in
red.
?
6.Identify points of confusion to clarify by
asking a partner or teacher.
7.Identify information to be used on a test,
essay, for tutorial, etc.
visual/symbol
8.Create a visual/symbol to represent
important information to be remembered.
E - Exchange Ideas
Step 5: Exchange ideas by collaboration
-Collaborate with a peer(s), as a small group, in your tutorial group, whole
class, outside of class, etc., to compare, enhance, and revise your notes.
-Using a different color pen, fill in any gaps, and clarify any points of
confusion in writing to complete your notes.
-Brainstorm a list of key vocabulary from the lesson to be included in the
summary
PART III. NOTE-INTERACTING: Interact with notes taken by creating a synthesized
summary. Use notes as a learning tool to increase content class achievement.
L - Link Learning
Key
Word
Showing Page:
4/9
Step 6: Link learning to create a synthesized summary.
-Review notes taken, questions developed on the left, and prior knowledge to identify the main ideas
to be used in the summary.
-Address the essential question of the lesson in the summary.
-Use the notes of the right side as support to write the summary.
-Synthesize, combine main ideas together, to internalize learning from the questions/notes.
-Answer the higher-level questions from the left side in the summary to tie together the main ideas.
L - Learning Tool
Step 7: Use completed Cornell notes as a learning tool.
-Review notes taken, questions developed and summary; this may also be done in a study group.
-Apply new learning to increase performance in content class by using notes to study for a test, to write an
essay, as a reference during tutorial, to prepare for a presentation or Socratic Seminar, Philosophical
Chairs, debates, etc.
-Interact with material by taking notes, writing questions, and summarizing to internalize material to
increase new learning.
-Using the notes as a learning tool provides opportunity for students to transfer knowledge to long-term
memory by making meaning of the notes and forming connections.
PART IV. NOTE-REFLECTING: Use written feedback to address areas of
challenge by setting focus goals to improve future notes.
W - Written Feedback
Step 8: Provide written feedback.
- Students need to submit Cornell notes weekly or biweekly to be checked for quality using the
Cornell notes rubric or checklist and/or quantity in binder check.
- Learners must review, revise, and improve notes, questions, and summary based on
feedback.
Showing Page:
5/9
-Written feedback and suggestions for improvement may be provided by a peer, a tutor, or
teacher.
A - Address Feedback
Step 9: Address written feedback.
-Students need to use the feedback provided to identify an area of challenge.
-Scholars can write a focus goal to improve in this area.
-Identify specific actions to address this challenge in future note-taking.
A - Address Feedback
Step 10: Address written feedback.
-Students will gather all Cornell notes on the topic, concept, standard, objective, essay, etc.
-Review notes, question, and summaries on all Cornell note pages.
-Students will reflect on their learning by completing a “Cornell Note Reflective Log” to show
how they mastered and/or applied their knowledge.
Cornell Note Revision Checklist
Completed
Symbol
Revision
1, 2 3…
A, B, C….
1.Number the notes for each concept or main
idea
Showing Page:
6/9
2.Circle key terms in pencil.
Main Idea
3.Highlight or underline main ideas in pencil
4.Fill in gaps of missing information and/or
reword/ paraphrase in red
Unimportant
5.Delete/ cross out unimportant information by
drawing a line through it in red.
?
6.Identify points of confusion to clarify by asking a
partner or teacher.
7.Identify information to be used on a test, essay,
for tutorial, etc.
visual/symbol
8.Create a visual/symbol to represent important
information to be remembered.
Cornell Note Questions
Steps for Creating Questions
Step 1:
Read the essential question/standard/objective at the top of the Cornell Notes.
Step 2:
Review the first chunk of notes on the right side. A chunk is defined as a section of notes
with the same main idea.
Key
Word
Showing Page:
7/9
Step 3:
Identify the main idea of the first chunk.
Step 4:
Write a question for the first chunk that can be answered by the main idea.
Step 5:
Repeat this process until all the main ideas in each chunk of notes are incorporated into
questions.
Step 6:
Reread your questions. Are there any lower-level questions? At times, lower-level
questions are necessary to create context for more advanced material to come.
Step 7:
Create an additional higher-level question that incorporates two of the lower-level
questions.
For example:
Lower-level question #1: What is the definition of perimeter?
Lower-level question #2: What is the definition of area?
New higher-level question added to notes: How does perimeter compare/contrast to
area?
Step 8:
Create notes to address the new higher-level question created from lower-level questions.
Step 9:
Review your questions/notes to ensure the essential question/standard/objective at the
top of the Cornell notes is addressed.
Step 10:
Review your questions/notes to study for tests/quizzes, write essays, or use for a tutorial
question.
Cornell Note Summary Template
Step 1:
Read the essential question/standard/objective at the top of the Cornell Notes.
Step 2:
Respond/ to the essential question/standard/objective in one sentence - this is the
introductory sentence to the summary. Use your own words in writing your summary.
Step 3:
Review the first chunk of notes on the right side.
Step 4:
Reread the first question written for the first chunk.
Step 5:
Write a one-sentence response to this question incorporating content-based vocabulary.
Showing Page:
8/9
Step 6:
Repeat this process until all your questions are incorporated in the summary - accounting
for all the main ideas in your notes.
Step 7:
Reread your summary for clarity and accuracy, adding transitions, when possible.
Step 8:
Review your summary to study for tests/quizzes, writing essays, and projects
Summary Paragraph Template:
Essential question/standard/objective introductory sentence:
_________________________________________________________________________________
__
_________________________________________________________________________________
__
Response to the question for the 1st chunk of notes:
_________________________________________________________________________________
_
_________________________________________________________________________________
_
Response to the question for the 2nd chunk of notes:
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
Response to questions for all additional chunks of notes:
__________________________________________________________________________________
Cornell Note-Taking Checklist
Name:
Evaluator:
Date:
Directions: Usa a mark in the appropriate column based on the Cornell Notes collected.
Showing Page:
9/9
STEP
Indicators
Yes
(2pts. each)
Inconsistent/
Incomplete
(1pt each)
No
(0 pt. each)
Step 1:
Create Format
-Heading in ink (name, topic, period, date)
-Standard/Objective/Essential Question recorded
Step 2:
Organize Notes
-Only main ideas, key words, and phrase recorded
-Sufficient space/indentation is used to show
relationships between main ideas
-Abbreviations/symbols used appropriately
-Bullets are used to create lists and organize notes
-Paraphrasing/shortcuts is evident in notes
Step 3:
Revise Notes
-Notes are numbered to indicate a new concepts,
main idea, or topic
-Vocabulary/ key terms are circled and main ideas are
highlighted or underlined in pencil.
-Missing/paraphrased information is added in red
Step 4:
Note Key Ideas
-Questions on left are developed to reflect main ideas
in notes on the right side
Bonus!
-Summary reflects the questions/notes
Total Points = ________out of 22

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Summarizing Content Using Cornell Notes To successfully master today’s core content, English Language Learners and struggling students require additional literacy and fluency support. One of the challenges of English language development (ELD) is grasping the skill of summarization. This abstract activity not only requires a good understanding of written and spoken English, but also calls for adequate comprehension of ideas. One simple yet powerful tool for English language learners to learn to summarize content is called Cornell Notes. It enables them to synthesize content knowledge and organize their understanding into complete sentences. The technique incorporates seven simple steps that help students to take notes, prioritize information, and restate key points with supporting details. FOUR PARTS OF THE CORNELL WAY PART I. NOTE-TAKING: Reading or listening to information for the first time while jotting down and organizing key points to be used later as a learning tool. C- Create Format ❏ Step 1: Create Cornell notes format and complete heading. Topic/Objective: Name: -Students will write the topic of Class/Period: the day’s lesson. Date: Essential Question(s): Learners will turn the content standard into a question. Also, they will create the the ELD standard into a question. O- Organize Notes ❏ Step 2: Organize notes on right side. Questions: Notes: -Students will take notes while listening to a lecture, watching a video clip, solving a math problem, participating in a science lab, or engaging in a cooperative activity. -Learners must take notes in their own words or paraphrase what they hear. -Students need to leave spaces for revisions by skipping lines between ideas. -Scholars should abbreviate words and use symbols, when appropriate (teacher can provide abbreviations and symbols that are appropriate to content). -Students should use indentation to show relationships between ideas. -Teachers can show students how to distinguish between important information vs. trivial information. -Learners must recognize cues, “This is important…” “This may be on the next test…” and repeated information. PART II. NOTE - MAKING: Within 24 hours of taking notes, students need to revise their notes, generate questions, and use collaboration to create meaning. R - Review and Revise ❏ Step 3: Review and revise notes on the right side of the note paper. Questions: Notes: N-Note Key Students must revise their notes using the following checklist: Ideas ❏ 1, 2 3… A, B, C…. ❏ Key Word ❏ Main Idea Step 4: Note key ideas to create ?’s. -Use inquiry on the left side that connects to the key ideas. -Review the main ideas highlighted on the right side. -Determine the purpose of the lecture, reading, or activity. -Read aloud the highlighted main ideas on the page, and create a question that is answered with this main idea. -Develop questions on the left side that identify the main ideas on the right side by interacting with the information through the revision process in Step 3 ❏ 2.Circle key terms in pencil. 3.Highlight or underline main ideas in pencil 4.Fill in gaps of missing information and/or reword/ paraphrase in red ❏ Unimportant ❏ ? 5.Delete/ cross out unimportant information by drawing a line through it in red. 6.Identify points of confusion to clarify by asking a partner or teacher. 7.Identify information to be used on a test, essay, for tutorial, etc. ❏ ❏ 1.Number the notes for each concept or main idea visual/symbol 8.Create a visual/symbol to represent important information to be remembered. E - Exchange Ideas ❏ Step 5: Exchange ideas by collaboration -Collaborate with a peer(s), as a small group, in your tutorial group, whole class, outside of class, etc., to compare, enhance, and revise your notes. -Using a different color pen, fill in any gaps, and clarify any points of confusion in writing to complete your notes. -Brainstorm a list of key vocabulary from the lesson to be included in the summary PART III. NOTE-INTERACTING: Interact with notes taken by creating a synthesized summary. Use notes as a learning tool to increase content class achievement. L - Link Learning ❏ Step 6: Link learning to create a synthesized summary. -Review notes taken, questions developed on the left, and prior knowledge to identify the main ideas to be used in the summary. -Address the essential question of the lesson in the summary. -Use the notes of the right side as support to write the summary. -Synthesize, combine main ideas together, to internalize learning from the questions/notes. -Answer the higher-level questions from the left side in the summary to tie together the main ideas. L - Learning Tool ❏ Step 7: Use completed Cornell notes as a learning tool. -Review notes taken, questions developed and summary; this may also be done in a study group. -Apply new learning to increase performance in content class by using notes to study for a test, to write an essay, as a reference during tutorial, to prepare for a presentation or Socratic Seminar, Philosophical Chairs, debates, etc. -Interact with material by taking notes, writing questions, and summarizing to internalize material to increase new learning. -Using the notes as a learning tool provides opportunity for students to transfer knowledge to long-term memory by making meaning of the notes and forming connections. PART IV. NOTE-REFLECTING: Use written feedback to address areas of challenge by setting focus goals to improve future notes. W - Written Feedback ❏ Step 8: Provide written feedback. - Students need to submit Cornell notes weekly or biweekly to be checked for quality using the Cornell notes rubric or checklist and/or quantity in binder check. - Learners must review, revise, and improve notes, questions, and summary based on feedback. -Written feedback and suggestions for improvement may be provided by a peer, a tutor, or teacher. A - Address Feedback ❏ Step 9: Address written feedback. -Students need to use the feedback provided to identify an area of challenge. -Scholars can write a focus goal to improve in this area. -Identify specific actions to address this challenge in future note-taking. A - Address Feedback ❏ Step 10: Address written feedback. -Students will gather all Cornell notes on the topic, concept, standard, objective, essay, etc. -Review notes, question, and summaries on all Cornell note pages. -Students will reflect on their learning by completing a “Cornell Note Reflective Log” to show how they mastered and/or applied their knowledge. Cornell Note Revision Checklist Completed ❏ Symbol 1, 2 3… A, B, C…. Revision 1.Number the notes for each concept or main idea ❏ ❏ 2.Circle key terms in pencil. Key Word Main Idea 3.Highlight or underline main ideas in pencil ❏ ❏ ❏ 4.Fill in gaps of missing information and/or reword/ paraphrase in red Unimportant 6.Identify points of confusion to clarify by asking a partner or teacher. ? 7.Identify information to be used on a test, essay, for tutorial, etc. ❏ ❏ 5.Delete/ cross out unimportant information by drawing a line through it in red. visual/symbol 8.Create a visual/symbol to represent important information to be remembered. Cornell Note Questions Steps for Creating Questions Step 1: Read the essential question/standard/objective at the top of the Cornell Notes. Step 2: Review the first chunk of notes on the right side. A chunk is defined as a section of notes with the same main idea. Step 3: Identify the main idea of the first chunk. Step 4: Write a question for the first chunk that can be answered by the main idea. Step 5: Repeat this process until all the main ideas in each chunk of notes are incorporated into questions. Step 6: Reread your questions. Are there any lower-level questions? At times, lower-level questions are necessary to create context for more advanced material to come. Step 7: Create an additional higher-level question that incorporates two of the lower-level questions. For example: Lower-level question #1: What is the definition of perimeter? Lower-level question #2: What is the definition of area? New higher-level question added to notes: How does perimeter compare/contrast to area? Step 8: Create notes to address the new higher-level question created from lower-level questions. Step 9: Review your questions/notes to ensure the essential question/standard/objective at the top of the Cornell notes is addressed. Step 10: Review your questions/notes to study for tests/quizzes, write essays, or use for a tutorial question. Cornell Note Summary Template Step 1: Read the essential question/standard/objective at the top of the Cornell Notes. Step 2: Respond/ to the essential question/standard/objective in one sentence - this is the introductory sentence to the summary. Use your own words in writing your summary. Step 3: Review the first chunk of notes on the right side. Step 4: Reread the first question written for the first chunk. Step 5: Write a one-sentence response to this question incorporating content-based vocabulary. Step 6: Repeat this process until all your questions are incorporated in the summary - accounting for all the main ideas in your notes. Step 7: Reread your summary for clarity and accuracy, adding transitions, when possible. Step 8: Review your summary to study for tests/quizzes, writing essays, and projects Summary Paragraph Template: ● Essential question/standard/objective introductory sentence: _________________________________________________________________________________ __ _________________________________________________________________________________ __ ● Response to the question for the 1st chunk of notes: _________________________________________________________________________________ _ _________________________________________________________________________________ _ ● Response to the question for the 2nd chunk of notes: __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ ● Response to questions for all additional chunks of notes: __________________________________________________________________________________ Cornell Note-Taking Checklist Name: Directions: Usa a Evaluator: Date: mark in the appropriate column based on the Cornell Notes collected. STEP Indicators Yes Inconsistent/ Incomplete (2pts. each) No (0 pt. each) (1pt each) Step 1: Create Format -Heading in ink (name, topic, period, date) -Standard/Objective/Essential Question recorded -Only main ideas, key words, and phrase recorded Step 2: Organize Notes -Sufficient space/indentation is used to show relationships between main ideas -Abbreviations/symbols used appropriately -Bullets are used to create lists and organize notes -Paraphrasing/shortcuts is evident in notes Step 3: Revise Notes -Notes are numbered to indicate a new concepts, main idea, or topic -Vocabulary/ key terms are circled and main ideas are highlighted or underlined in pencil. -Missing/paraphrased information is added in red -Questions on left are developed to reflect main ideas Step 4: Note Key Ideas in notes on the right side Bonus! -Summary reflects the questions/notes Total Points = ________out of 22 Name: Description: ...
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.
Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4