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Exercice 14
Book review
Review of the book yajnaseni by pratibha ray
Yajnaseni- The narrative of Draupadi, a prize-winning novel by Pratibha Ray, was published in 1984.
All of the Mahabharat's main characters appear in the tale, but it is Draupadi who takes centre stage
with her hardships and sufferings. Her inner psychology, which is sometimes overlooked, deserves to
be explored. The novel's distinctiveness resides in the fact that the narration is as pertinent today as
it was in Dvapar Yug. Women writers have always worked to bring the voices of women who have
been silenced by patriarchy to the fore. Pratibha Ray aspires to symbolise womankind and silenced
voices through her enigmatic protagonist Draupadi/Yajnaseni/Panchali/Krishnaa (as many people
refer to her).
Mahabharat is often deconstructed via the patriarchal eyes of Krishna, the Pandavas, and the
Kauravas. It is here that Draupadi's voice goes unheard. Ray's Yajnaseni differs from Vyasa's
Draupadi in that she has an indomitable spirit and not only questions but actually seeks to subvert
patriarchy. This tale is written in the style of an epistolary letter, which Draupadi writes to her Sakha,
Krishna, while waiting to die in the Himalayan foothills. She tracks her unique life for the world's
knowledge in this letter, and she firmly believes that history should not repeat itself, with no woman
humiliated in public as she was.
Her first misery is depicted in the opening chapter of the book. "Do not turn back to look!"
Yudhishthira whispered to Bhima when her foot slipped in the Himalayas. "Please come ahead!"
Draupadi makes her first revelation to Krishna with a sorrowful heart.
Draupadi's journey from being Panchali to justifying her name Yajnaseni is chronicled in Ray's work.
Yajnaseni is a one-of-a-kind name that denotes someone who is born from the sacrificial fires. As a
result, she evolves into the personification of virginity, self-sacrifice, courage, and unwavering spirit
over time. "The life of one born of this spark caused by the friction of wood and fire how could
that be complete without conflicts," Draupadi says of her life. Ray shows an unseen side of Draupadi
when women were denied access to education. She portrays Draupadi as a poet with extensive
knowledge of the Vedas, something that is rarely addressed in other versions of the epic. Arjuna has
even said:
says:
“I had heard that the princess is adept in the scriptures. Then I believed that for women to know
scriptures meant learning them by rote like parrots. But now it appears that you have not
memorized the scriptures but internalized them. You are not only knowledgeable but full of wisdom
too. I admit defeat before you.”
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She initially gives her love to Krishna, but at her father's request, she accepts to marry Arjuna. Some
may criticise Draupadi's mental instability, yet it simply lends her more human attributes, not those
of some other worldly creature.
In marriage, women are objectified, and Draupadi was no exception. King Drupada agreed to give
her away as a swayamvar item. She couldn't get away from the ardent gazes of the invited visitors,
but she was saved by a veil created by the bees. When she was divided among the Pandavas, she
erupted in rage and began challenging social rules. She wondered why a guy with multiple wives was
accepted in society, while a woman with multiple spouses was not.
She had to put up with the amorous looks of Jayadratha and Dussashan on multiple occasions, as
well as taunts and humiliation from Karna and Duryodhan. The disrobing of Draupadi in Kuru Sabha
in front of her kinsmen was the most humiliating occurrence. Menstruating Draupadi ventured to
question Yudhisthira and the other elders in front of the elders, something no other lady would have
the audacity to do. "Go and ask my husband if he staked himself and lost first or me?" Draupadi said
steadily to Pratikami. She could not endure anyone's unjust authority over her, and she never shied
away from hatred. "Everything in social and cultural life is basically about power," Jordan and
Weedon argue in Cultural Politics.
Cultural politics revolves around power. It's an important part of culture." She refused to
acknowledge her husband (authority of power) as God because she believed it would lead to
hierarchical tyranny. Yudhisthira could not possibly bet on her in a dice game, she reasoned. She
began to question the laws of society in Manusmriti, where women's roles in society were limited to
wife and householder, limiting their independence.
While in exile in the bush, Draupadi showed a softer side when she compassionately fed two
orphaned children, Kambu and Jambu. Despite being the queen of the majestic Indraprastha, she
realises the greater purpose of life and rejects wealth. She's perplexed as to why males like Arjun
and Karna swear to keep away from women till their vows are fulfilled. Is it true that women
wheedle their souls from them?
In the novel, there is a strong sense of female solidarity. Yajnaseni holds no animosity against her co-
wife Subhadra. She treats her as if she were her younger sister. She sympathised with Kunti, her
mother-in-law, who had to bear children through various men and endure the same social ridicule as
her. Drona's second wife, Harita, is unloved by her husband and lives solely for Ashwathama.
Draupadi bemoans her loveless existence. Panchali is empowered by Harita's chastity, self-control,
sacrifices, and dutifulness. She even becomes friends with Karna's wife, Ritubati, who later informs
her of Karna's admiration for her self-esteem.
In Yajnaseni, Draupadi has a multifaceted role. She is Annapurna in the wilderness, a woman who
maintains balance among her five husbands, a sobbing mother on the battlefield, a queen who
resists consumerism and pursues her husband in exile altruistically. She resents the wrongs done to
her in the name of Dharma preservation. She doesn't even hesitate to voice her passion for Arjuna,
the third Pandava. Draupadi's outspokenness is frequently misinterpreted as her outrageousness.
Yajnaseni is a novel written by a woman, which adds to the novel's sorrow. Writing is a liberating
experience. As a result, Draupadi manages to write her laments to her Sakha near the end of her life.
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Draupadi is a role model for ladies of all ages. All women persevere because of the agony, the trip,
the humiliation, and the patience. This novel was dedicated to the repercussions of colonial
authority, as Bhavna Sharma correctly points out. The man-woman relationship was likewise to be
examined. Women's roles had to be repositioned. Pratibha Ray returns to the fabled character of
Draupadi to demonstrate that she is a real woman with common feelings. The truths of Draupadi's
life are brought to light by Ray. Draupadi is no longer an object, but rather the topic, thanks to Ray's
writing.

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Exercice 14 Book review Review of the book yajnaseni by pratibha ray Yajnaseni- The narrative of Draupadi, a prize-winning novel by Pratibha Ray, was published in 1984. All of the Mahabharat's main characters appear in the tale, but it is Draupadi who takes centre stage with her hardships and sufferings. Her inner psychology, which is sometimes overlooked, deserves to be explored. The novel's distinctiveness resides in the fact that the narration is as pertinent today as it was in Dvapar Yug. Women writers have always worked to bring the voices of women who have been silenced by patriarchy to the fore. Pratibha Ray aspires to symbolise womankind and silenced voices through her enigmatic protagonist Draupadi/Yajnaseni/Panchali/Krishnaa (as many people refer to her). Mahabharat is often deconstructed via the patriarchal eyes of Krishna, the Pandavas, and the Kauravas. It is here that Draupadi's voice goes unheard. Ray's Yajnaseni differs from Vyasa's Draupadi in that she has an indomitable spirit and not only questions but actually seeks to subvert patriarchy. This tale is written in the style of an epistolary letter, which Draupadi writes to her Sakha, Krishna, while waiting to die in the Himalayan foothills. She tracks her unique life for the world's knowledge in this letter, and she firmly believes that history should not repeat itself, with no woman humiliated in public as she was. Her first misery is depicted in the opening chapter of the book. "Do not turn back to look!" Yudhishthira whispered to Bhima when her foot slipped in the Himalayas. "Please come ahead!" Draupadi makes her first revelation to Krishna with a sorrowful heart. Draupadi's journey from being Panchali to justifying her name Yajnaseni is chronicled in Ray's work. Yajnaseni is a one-of-a-kind name that denotes someone who is born from the sacrificial fires. As a result, she evolves into the personification of virginity, self-sacrifice, courage, and unwavering spirit over time. "The life of one born of this spark caused by the friction of wood and fire — how could that be complete without conflicts," Draupadi says of her life. Ray shows an unseen side of Draupadi when women were denied access to education. She portrays Draupadi as a poet with extensive knowledge of the Vedas, something that is rarely addressed in other versions of the epic. Arjuna has even said: says: “I had heard that the princess is adept in the scriptures. Then I believed that for women to know scriptures meant learning them by rote like parrots. But now it appears that you have not memorized the scriptures but internalized them. You are not only knowledgeable but full of wisdom too. I admit defeat before you.” She initially gives her love to Krishna, but at her father's request, she accepts to marry Arjuna. Some may criticise Draupadi's mental instability, yet it simply lends her more human attributes, not those of some other worldly creature. In marriage, women are objectified, and Draupadi was no exception. King Drupada agreed to give her away as a swayamvar item. She couldn't get away from the ardent gazes of the invited visitors, but she was saved by a veil created by the bees. When she was divided among the Pandavas, she erupted in rage and began challenging social rules. She wondered why a guy with multiple wives was accepted in society, while a woman with multiple spouses was not. She had to put up with the amorous looks of Jayadratha and Dussashan on multiple occasions, as well as taunts and humiliation from Karna and Duryodhan. The disrobing of Draupadi in Kuru Sabha in front of her kinsmen was the most humiliating occurrence. Menstruating Draupadi ventured to question Yudhisthira and the other elders in front of the elders, something no other lady would have the audacity to do. "Go and ask my husband if he staked himself and lost first or me?" Draupadi said steadily to Pratikami. She could not endure anyone's unjust authority over her, and she never shied away from hatred. "Everything in social and cultural life is basically about power," Jordan and Weedon argue in Cultural Politics. Cultural politics revolves around power. It's an important part of culture." She refused to acknowledge her husband (authority of power) as God because she believed it would lead to hierarchical tyranny. Yudhisthira could not possibly bet on her in a dice game, she reasoned. She began to question the laws of society in Manusmriti, where women's roles in society were limited to wife and householder, limiting their independence. While in exile in the bush, Draupadi showed a softer side when she compassionately fed two orphaned children, Kambu and Jambu. Despite being the queen of the majestic Indraprastha, she realises the greater purpose of life and rejects wealth. She's perplexed as to why males like Arjun and Karna swear to keep away from women till their vows are fulfilled. Is it true that women wheedle their souls from them? In the novel, there is a strong sense of female solidarity. Yajnaseni holds no animosity against her cowife Subhadra. She treats her as if she were her younger sister. She sympathised with Kunti, her mother-in-law, who had to bear children through various men and endure the same social ridicule as her. Drona's second wife, Harita, is unloved by her husband and lives solely for Ashwathama. Draupadi bemoans her loveless existence. Panchali is empowered by Harita's chastity, self-control, sacrifices, and dutifulness. She even becomes friends with Karna's wife, Ritubati, who later informs her of Karna's admiration for her self-esteem. In Yajnaseni, Draupadi has a multifaceted role. She is Annapurna in the wilderness, a woman who maintains balance among her five husbands, a sobbing mother on the battlefield, a queen who resists consumerism and pursues her husband in exile altruistically. She resents the wrongs done to her in the name of Dharma preservation. She doesn't even hesitate to voice her passion for Arjuna, the third Pandava. Draupadi's outspokenness is frequently misinterpreted as her outrageousness. Yajnaseni is a novel written by a woman, which adds to the novel's sorrow. Writing is a liberating experience. As a result, Draupadi manages to write her laments to her Sakha near the end of her life. Draupadi is a role model for ladies of all ages. All women persevere because of the agony, the trip, the humiliation, and the patience. This novel was dedicated to the repercussions of colonial authority, as Bhavna Sharma correctly points out. The man-woman relationship was likewise to be examined. Women's roles had to be repositioned. Pratibha Ray returns to the fabled character of Draupadi to demonstrate that she is a real woman with common feelings. The truths of Draupadi's life are brought to light by Ray. Draupadi is no longer an object, but rather the topic, thanks to Ray's writing. Name: Description: ...
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