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Surname 1
Student’s Name
Professors’ name
Course
Date
Kübler-Ross model, Reflection Essay, and Older Adults Care
Part 1
Kübler-Ross model
Elisabeth Kubler-Ross created the theory of the five stages of grief which that once people lose
their loved ones, they go through five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and
acceptance (Holland). Denial involves experiencing emotional pain and pretending that a change
has not happened as one tries to shift their mind to the new reality. Anger is a masking step where
people hide emotions and pain that they carry because of emotional discomfort. Bargaining
involves getting into a resentment state where someone creates a lot of what if and if only
statements. This feeling of helplessness makes people turn to a higher power like God. Depression
is a quiet stage where people now come to a state of calm and look at the present situation's reality.
Finally, acceptance means that the person has accepted, but it does not mean they are happy or do
not feel the pain. They no longer fight with the situation since they cannot reverse or do something
different about it.
Morrie’s Stages of Grief:
Denial: Morrie did not experience denial of his father's diagnosis.
Anger: Morrie was angry at his dad since he never loved him when he was alive.
Bargaining: Morrie wishes his father would come back so as to talk to him.
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Surname 2
Depression: Morrie felt sorry for himself, mourned, and cried in the morning.
Acceptance: Morrie had accepted his father's diagnosis and could not have fought further with the
situation.
Self-Reflection
I am fearful of death. This fear is because I do not know what type of death I will die, whether in
an accident or from an illness. I also do not know whether someone feels pain or not. Also, I do
not figure out how I will die and leave some of the fun things I enjoy when I am alive. Finally, it
can be a sad moment for my family when I die, and I will leave them in grief and stress, keeping
in mind how much they mean to me.
Hospice vs. Palliative Care
Hospice is a place that takes care of a person with serious illness and nears the end of their life. It
offers services from professional health care providers who give comfort to a terminally ill person
by pain reduction and administering physical, spiritual, psychological, and spiritual needs.
Palliative care is different from hospice care because it provides care and comfort at the beginning
of diagnosis and through the treatment process instead of hospice care that begins care after the
disease's treatment is stopped, and, certainly, the patient will not survive the illness.
Part 2
Self-Reflection
When I have been diagnosed with an illness and have six months left to live, I would rather be
taken to a hospice rather than going home to be my burden to my family. In hospice, I will meet
health care professionals who will give me comfort and care both in physical, emotional,
psychological, and spiritual needs ensuring that I spend my last days happy and die in peace.
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Surname 3
Disclosure vs. non-disclosure. I prefer the doctor not to inform me of my illness. Knowing
I have a terminal illness will make me get into depression and even hasten me to commit suicide
since I know I have counted days to live.
Pain vs. control. I would rather use pain killers to surpass pain than sleeping since I will
not get any sleep when I am in pain. In case of difficulty breathing, I would prefer to spend my
remaining days on a respirator since I believe dying in pain is worse than dying peacefully.
Part 3
Older Adults Care
Older adults can be taken to the home for the elderly, meet others, and have people who will take
care of them well. Rural older adults may face a lack of access to modern improved health care
services since the services are mostly found in urban areas.
I would convince my mother to live in an assisted living facility by telling her that it is only
in the facilities that professional workers understand and know how to handle the seizure condition.
If she refuses to go to the facility and home care, I will talk to the relevant medical authorities talk
to her who will make it look like an order failure to which law will apply, and she can be detained.
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Surname 4
Works Cited
Holland, Kimberly. "Stages of Grief: General Patterns For Breakups, Divorce, Loss,
More". Healthline, 2021, https://www.healthline.com/health/stages-of-grief.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Surname 1 Student’s Name Professors’ name Course Date Kübler-Ross model, Reflection Essay, and Older Adults Care Part 1 Kübler-Ross model Elisabeth Kubler-Ross created the theory of the five stages of grief which that once people lose their loved ones, they go through five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance (Holland). Denial involves experiencing emotional pain and pretending that a change has not happened as one tries to shift their mind to the new reality. Anger is a masking step where people hide emotions and pain that they carry because of emotional discomfort. Bargaining involves getting into a resentment state where someone creates a lot of what if and if only statements. This feeling of helplessness makes people turn to a higher power like God. Depression is a quiet stage where people now come to a state of calm and look at the present situation's reality. Finally, acceptance means that the person has accepted, but it does not mean they are happy or do not feel the pain. They no longer fight with the situation since they cannot reverse or do something different about it. Morrie’s Stages of Grief: Denial: Morrie did not experience denial of his father's diagnosis. Anger: Morrie was angry at his dad since he never loved him when he was alive. Bargaining: Morrie wishes his father would come back so as to talk to him. Surname 2 Depression: Morrie felt sorry for himself, mourned, and cried in the morning. Acceptance: Morrie had accepted his father's diagnosis and could not have fought further with the situation. Self-Reflection I am fearful of death. This fear is because I do not know what type of death I will die, whether in an accident or from an illness. I also do not know whether someone feels pain or not. Also, I do not figure out how I will die and leave some of the fun things I enjoy when I am alive. Finally, it can be a sad moment for my family when I die, and I will leave them in grief and stress, keeping in mind how much they mean to me. Hospice vs. Palliative Care Hospice is a place that takes care of a person with serious illness and nears the end of their life. It offers services from professional health care providers who give comfort to a terminally ill person by pain reduction and administering physical, spiritual, psychological, and spiritual needs. Palliative care is different from hospice care because it provides care and comfort at the beginning of diagnosis and through the treatment process instead of hospice care that begins care after the disease's treatment is stopped, and, certainly, the patient will not survive the illness. Part 2 Self-Reflection When I have been diagnosed with an illness and have six months left to live, I would rather be taken to a hospice rather than going home to be my burden to my family. In hospice, I will meet health care professionals who will give me comfort and care both in physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual needs ensuring that I spend my last days happy and die in peace. Surname 3 Disclosure vs. non-disclosure. I prefer the doctor not to inform me of my illness. Knowing I have a terminal illness will make me get into depression and even hasten me to commit suicide since I know I have counted days to live. Pain vs. control. I would rather use pain killers to surpass pain than sleeping since I will not get any sleep when I am in pain. In case of difficulty breathing, I would prefer to spend my remaining days on a respirator since I believe dying in pain is worse than dying peacefully. Part 3 Older Adults Care Older adults can be taken to the home for the elderly, meet others, and have people who will take care of them well. Rural older adults may face a lack of access to modern improved health care services since the services are mostly found in urban areas. I would convince my mother to live in an assisted living facility by telling her that it is only in the facilities that professional workers understand and know how to handle the seizure condition. If she refuses to go to the facility and home care, I will talk to the relevant medical authorities talk to her who will make it look like an order failure to which law will apply, and she can be detained. Surname Works Cited Holland, Kimberly. "Stages of Grief: General Patterns For Breakups, Divorce, Loss, More". Healthline, 2021, https://www.healthline.com/health/stages-of-grief. 4 Name: Description: ...
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