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Week 3
DQ1 Question: Reflecting on this week’s literary readings, as well as your own reading
experiences, identify at least one major similarity and one major difference between the forms of
the short story and the poem. How do the differences between these literary forms affect how you
read and respond to them?
In your response, include an example of at least one poem from this week’s readings. Describe the
connections between (a) the poem’s form and/or use of literary devices and your experience of the
poem and (b) your reading experience (see key literary terms listed in our textbook e.g.,
alliteration, rhyme, iambic pentameter, etc.). If you wish, you may also compare your experience of
the poem to your experience reading a short story that shares with the poem a similar theme.
DQ1 Answer: When reading a short story, the details are provided for me to comprehend where the
writer wants me to focus or what they want me to visualize. They paint a picture for me through
words that allow me to picture the story in my mind. Truly, the only thing in a short story that I
need to figure out for myself is what I think the ending will be. There are times that we do not know
the true murderer in the story until the end. We may not know the mystery person that the writer is
writing about. However, there is still very little for the reader to make up on their own in
comparison to a poem. A poem can be a tell-all story in itself; however this can mean many details
are still left out. The reader is normally left wondering if their understanding of the poem was truly
how it was meant to be perceived by the writer. Many times there are hidden meanings in poetry.
Stories can also have hidden meanings, but not to the same extent in which a poem allows.
Symbolism is one example of this. A poem can use colors to tell the reader the mood or setting. If
this were done in a story, it would likely be overlooked or chalked up for a descriptive word.
Another way a poem varies from a short story is that it can be written in a form in which possesses
a rhythmic tone.
When I read "Not Waving But Drowning" by Stevie Smith, it brought forth the feeling of sadness.
It reminds me of how I sometimes see my friends doing bad things that I could have stopped them
from doing, but I did not stop them. Since this poem was written after the friend of the writer had
already died, it seemed as if there was much regret on the part of the writer. He wrote "But still he
lay moaning: I was much further out than you thought." This immediately told me that the writer
was the outside source looking in on the man who had died. His remorse came after the man had
died, since he did not realize his friend had been asking for help all along; the writer did not realize
his friend needed help until it was too late. This poem was written using assonance. In the first
section of the poem, the words " moaning" and "drowning" are used in this manor. In the second
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section of this poem the words "dead" and "said" are used as they have similar vowel sounds but the
words do not, themselves, rhyme. Stories, unless they are similar to that of Dr. Suess books, do not
normally hold this same tone. The tone of a poem is one of the ways a short story varies from a
poem.
Short stories and poems are alike in that they both tell the reader a story. It can be a story about
anything from love to sadness or even anger. The first thing I realize in either a poem or short story
is who is writing the piece. In poetry, the writer can take on many forms and usually it is more
difficult to depict the persona than in a short story. Nonetheless, a story and poem both have
persona behind them that forms the writing. In Stevie Smith's "Not Waving But Drowning" it is my
initial reaction that the writer is a bystander watching the man drown. I get this from the phrase "
Nobody heard him, the dead man." In a short story, the reader is able to determine who the story is
written by whether it is the scorned lover or the third person narration by a knowledgable source or
anything along those lines. If we can determine who is writing the story, within the first few lines of
a poem or paragraphs of a short story, we can gather the tone in which the writer wishes us to read
into. In this particular poem, the piece is written by the friend of the dead man that watched his
friend die. The writer can use figurative language to make us, the readers, feel the tone or
emotion in which they feel.
Another piece that can be found in both a short story or a poem is figurative language. Figurative
language can be found in either a short story or a poem. It enables the reader to compare two things.
Similes and metaphors are two uses of figurative language that allows the reader to compare two
things as the writer desires. In Lord Tennyson Alfred's "The Oak", he uses a simile of the oak tree,
"like yon oak", to compare against life, both of the young and old, "live thy life."
When reading a poem that has rhythm behind it, I find myself trying to guess the next word that the
writer will have me reading. It makes me feel as if I am more so filling in a blank, even though the
word is already there for me. When Lord Tennyson Alfred writes that "live thy life, young and old,
like yon oak..." I find myself thinking of words that rhyme with old that the writer could have used.
He could have used "gold" or "mold" or "cold" or anything that rhymed with "old". Continuing on
with the poem, I find that the writer used "gold". It makes me wonder why he chose "gold" to
rhyme with "old." In cases of rhyming poems, I find myself focusing more on the rhythm and words
than the actual meanings of the poem. It is distracting to me to read rhyming words. It makes me
wonder if the writer honestly wanted to use the word gold or if it was the only rhyming word he
could find to fit what he was trying to make me, the reader, feel. There are only so many words that
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rhyme with "old". The next section, Alfred uses the rhyming words "then" and "again" to create the
rhythm. It, again, makes me wonder if he really wanted to use those words or if it was the
limitation of words he had to choose from that rhymed with "then." Short stories do not have this
type of rhythm; therefore my focus is on the words instead of the rhyme.
DQ2 Question: Listen to We Real Cool and My Papa’s Waltz. These clips demonstrate the
importance of performance, rhythm, and musicality in the poetic form.
Describe your listening experience of one or more of the poems. (If you prefer, you may find a
recording of another poem from the course readings and describe your listening experience of it
instead. If you choose this option, be sure to provide a link to the audio of the chosen poem.) How
did hearing the text(s) recited aloud compare to a silent reading of it/them? Did the performance in
any ways add to or detract from your experience of the text? Did the performance change your
perception of the poem or its content in any ways? Explain how (or how not).
Support your ideas with textual details and analysis. When applicable, address how specific literary
techniques and/or devices contributed to your experience?
DQ2 Answer: When listening to Gwendolyn Brooks read her poem "We Real Cool" it reminded
me of the movie "Grease" back in the late 1970's. It was initially written about some unruly kids
that she viewed from outside of a pool haul while they should have been at school. This was her
viewpoint and thus the persona of the poem. I must compare it again to the movie "Grease". In her
poem, with the tone in which she tells the poem, I can identify the slang of the words with the era of
greasers. Instead of saying "we are real cool" she imagines them thinking "we real cool" which
either means they are illiterate or she imagines them talking like greasers with their own variance
to vocabulary.
As Brooks reads her poem, it felt like I was listening to a speech. It was proud and confident all in
one. The repetitive use of the word "we" was unique in this poem. It was after a short phrase, but
was to begin another phrase. However, it was on a different line of the poem. "We real cool. We"
was line one of the poem. When Brooks read this poem, she paused both after "cool" and "we". This
segregated the idea that she was painting for me, the reader. It also gave more focus to the word
"we". In today's world, we make comments about oh poor "me me me me". In this poem, she set the
tone of the poem that they were all about themselves in her opinion. She imagined them being
boastful and self-absorbed, each of them. This is perhaps why she was redundant in her usage of the
term "we". Additional to her repetition, she also used rhyming words. In the first section of her
poem, the words "cool" and school" were used. They were both used as the last word before the
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period, thus focusing on the sound of the words. Each paragraph follows the same structure. The
lines in poem poem, although varied in the number of syllables each encompassed, they had rhythm
as she read them. If I were to read "we real cool. we" and then "left school. we", I would not have
followed them as smoothly as when she read them out loud. When reading "we real cool, we she
raised the pitch in her voice on the word "real", as if the word were not part of the phrase and the
rhythm in which she was about to follow. She held the same breath and time frame for each line,
regardless of the syllables of the line. If I were to just read this to myself, I would not have gotten
the same expressive words from it that her reading it out loud set forth.
When she read it, I almost got the feeling she was strutting as she read it; perhaps illustrating how
she imagined these boys would have walked since they portrayed "bad boys" to her. You can hear it
in her tone: when reading "We real cool" you can picture them walking slow throwing back one
shoulder. Then hearing the quick "we" read, I imagined a quick switch of the shoulders, just like a
strut with a comb to the greasy hair. The next lines of the poem, while read, you can feel another
walk in the strut and then a short boastful step.
Although she did not know them, it is unique how just by viewing them outside a pool haul that she
could gather these ideas about them. I think that the preface of the poem gives insight to what
Brooks was thinking and how this poem came about. Telling us that this took place outside of a
pool haul definitely builds a different picture for the poem since the poem eludes to no exact setting
itself. The poem definitely meant more when the poet gave insight first and then read her own poem
to us. Had it been anyone else reading that poem, without the insight that she had from the creation
of the poem, the meaning would have varied person to person and the tone and rhythm would not
have been the same.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Week 3 DQ1 Question: Reflecting on this week’s literary readings, as well as your own reading experiences, identify at least one major similarity and one major difference between the forms of the short story and the poem. How do the differences between these literary forms affect how you read and respond to them? In your response, include an example of at least one poem from this week’s readings. Describe the connections between (a) the poem’s form and/or use of literary devices and your experience of the poem and (b) your reading experience (see key literary terms listed in our textbook – e.g., alliteration, rhyme, iambic pentameter, etc.). If you wish, you may also compare your experience of the poem to your experience reading a short story that shares with the poem a similar theme. DQ1 Answer: When reading a short story, the details are provided for me to comprehend where the writer wants me to focus or what they want me to visualize. They paint a picture for me through words that allow me to picture the story in my mind. Truly, the only thing in a short story that I need to figure out for myself is what I think the ending will be. There are times that we do not know the true murderer in the story until the end. We may not know the mystery person that the writer is writing about. However, there is still very little for the reader to make up on their own in comparison to a poem. A poem can be a tell-all story in itself; however this can mean many details are still left out. The reader is normally left wondering if their understanding of the poem was truly how it was meant to be perceived by the writer. Many times there are hidden meanings in poetry. Stories can also have hidden meanings, but not to the same extent in which a poem allows. Symbolism is one example of this. A poem can use colors to tell the reader the mood or setting. If this were done in a story, it would likely be overlooked or chalked up for a descriptive word. Another way a poem varies from a short story is that it can be written in a form in which possesses a rhythmic tone. When I read "Not Waving But Drowning" by Stevie Smith, it brought forth the feeling of sadness. It reminds me of how I sometimes see my friends doing bad things that I could have stopped them from doing, but I did not stop them. Since this poem was written after the friend of the writer had already died, it seemed as if there was much regret on the part of the writer. He wrote "But still he lay moaning: I was much further out than you thought." This immediately told me that the writer was the outside source looking in on the man who had died. His remorse came after the man had died, since he did not realize his friend had been asking for help all along; the writer did not realize his friend needed help until it was too late. This poem was written using assonance. In the first section of the poem, the words " moaning" and "drowning" are used in this manor. In the second section of this poem the words "dead" and "said" are used as they have similar vowel sounds but the words do not, themselves, rhyme. Stories, unless they are similar to that of Dr. Suess books, do not normally hold this same tone. The tone of a poem is one of the ways a short story varies from a poem. Short stories and poems are alike in that they both tell the reader a story. It can be a story about anything from love to sadness or even anger. The first thing I realize in either a poem or short story is who is writing the piece. In poetry, the writer can take on many forms and usually it is more difficult to depict the persona than in a short story. Nonetheless, a story and poem both have persona behind them that forms the writing. In Stevie Smith's "Not Waving But Drowning" it is my initial reaction that the writer is a bystander watching the man drown. I get this from the phrase " Nobody heard him, the dead man." In a short story, the reader is able to determine who the story is written by whether it is the scorned lover or the third person narration by a knowledgable source or anything along those lines. If we can determine who is writing the story, within the first few lines of a poem or paragraphs of a short story, we can gather the tone in which the writer wishes us to read into. In this particular poem, the piece is written by the friend of the dead man that watched his friend die. The writer can use figurative language to make us, the readers, feel the tone or emotion in which they feel. Another piece that can be found in both a short story or a poem is figurative language. Figurative language can be found in either a short story or a poem. It enables the reader to compare two things. Similes and metaphors are two uses of figurative language that allows the reader to compare two things as the writer desires. In Lord Tennyson Alfred's "The Oak", he uses a simile of the oak tree, "like yon oak", to compare against life, both of the young and old, "live thy life." When reading a poem that has rhythm behind it, I find myself trying to guess the next word that the writer will have me reading. It makes me feel as if I am more so filling in a blank, even though the word is already there for me. When Lord Tennyson Alfred writes that "live thy life, young and old, like yon oak..." I find myself thinking of words that rhyme with old that the writer could have used. He could have used "gold" or "mold" or "cold" or anything that rhymed with "old". Continuing on with the poem, I find that the writer used "gold". It makes me wonder why he chose "gold" to rhyme with "old." In cases of rhyming poems, I find myself focusing more on the rhythm and words than the actual meanings of the poem. It is distracting to me to read rhyming words. It makes me wonder if the writer honestly wanted to use the word gold or if it was the only rhyming word he could find to fit what he was trying to make me, the reader, feel. There are only so many words that rhyme with "old". The next section, Alfred uses the rhyming words "then" and "again" to create the rhythm. It, again, makes me wonder if he really wanted to use those words or if it was the limitation of words he had to choose from that rhymed with "then." Short stories do not have this type of rhythm; therefore my focus is on the words instead of the rhyme. DQ2 Question: Listen to We Real Cool and My Papa’s Waltz. These clips demonstrate the importance of performance, rhythm, and musicality in the poetic form. Describe your listening experience of one or more of the poems. (If you prefer, you may find a recording of another poem from the course readings and describe your listening experience of it instead. If you choose this option, be sure to provide a link to the audio of the chosen poem.) How did hearing the text(s) recited aloud compare to a silent reading of it/them? Did the performance in any ways add to or detract from your experience of the text? Did the performance change your perception of the poem or its content in any ways? Explain how (or how not). Support your ideas with textual details and analysis. When applicable, address how specific literary techniques and/or devices contributed to your experience? DQ2 Answer: When listening to Gwendolyn Brooks read her poem "We Real Cool" it reminded me of the movie "Grease" back in the late 1970's. It was initially written about some unruly kids that she viewed from outside of a pool haul while they should have been at school. This was her viewpoint and thus the persona of the poem. I must compare it again to the movie "Grease". In her poem, with the tone in which she tells the poem, I can identify the slang of the words with the era of greasers. Instead of saying "we are real cool" she imagines them thinking "we real cool" which either means they are illiterate or she imagines them talking like greasers with their own variance to vocabulary. As Brooks reads her poem, it felt like I was listening to a speech. It was proud and confident all in one. The repetitive use of the word "we" was unique in this poem. It was after a short phrase, but was to begin another phrase. However, it was on a different line of the poem. "We real cool. We" was line one of the poem. When Brooks read this poem, she paused both after "cool" and "we". This segregated the idea that she was painting for me, the reader. It also gave more focus to the word "we". In today's world, we make comments about oh poor "me me me me". In this poem, she set the tone of the poem that they were all about themselves in her opinion. She imagined them being boastful and self-absorbed, each of them. This is perhaps why she was redundant in her usage of the term "we". Additional to her repetition, she also used rhyming words. In the first section of her poem, the words "cool" and school" were used. They were both used as the last word before the period, thus focusing on the sound of the words. Each paragraph follows the same structure. The lines in poem poem, although varied in the number of syllables each encompassed, they had rhythm as she read them. If I were to read "we real cool. we" and then "left school. we", I would not have followed them as smoothly as when she read them out loud. When reading "we real cool, we she raised the pitch in her voice on the word "real", as if the word were not part of the phrase and the rhythm in which she was about to follow. She held the same breath and time frame for each line, regardless of the syllables of the line. If I were to just read this to myself, I would not have gotten the same expressive words from it that her reading it out loud set forth. When she read it, I almost got the feeling she was strutting as she read it; perhaps illustrating how she imagined these boys would have walked since they portrayed "bad boys" to her. You can hear it in her tone: when reading "We real cool" you can picture them walking slow throwing back one shoulder. Then hearing the quick "we" read, I imagined a quick switch of the shoulders, just like a strut with a comb to the greasy hair. The next lines of the poem, while read, you can feel another walk in the strut and then a short boastful step. Although she did not know them, it is unique how just by viewing them outside a pool haul that she could gather these ideas about them. I think that the preface of the poem gives insight to what Brooks was thinking and how this poem came about. Telling us that this took place outside of a pool haul definitely builds a different picture for the poem since the poem eludes to no exact setting itself. The poem definitely meant more when the poet gave insight first and then read her own poem to us. Had it been anyone else reading that poem, without the insight that she had from the creation of the poem, the meaning would have varied person to person and the tone and rhythm would not have been the same. Name: Description: ...
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