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Surname 1
Name
Professor
Course
Date
1. Lou Gehrig
Gehrig was ranked third in RBIs (35) and 5
th
in Fall Classic homers (10).
Lou Gehrig managed a 1.214 OPS in seven career World Series.
2. July 4, 1939.
The country was on the path to recovery from the war in Europe and the Great
Depression.
Lou Gehrig had prepared himself to speak motivated by his previous marriage to Eleanor
Twitchell, who had suggested the idea of the speech.
Besides, Gehrig had been diagnosed with an ALS disease that had brought to an end his
ballplaying career. Lou refers to the disease as a 'bad break ' because it had forced him to
retire.
3. Lou Gehrig’s speech was from a positive tone and an optimistic one. Using pathos in the
entire speech while explaining the disease creates a gloomy mood within the audience.
Lou considers himself lucky despite facing a tough situation two weeks after being
diagnosed with the disease. His attitude, however, is flippant, which makes the audience
jealous of his life despite him battling ALS.
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Surname 2
4. Lou Gehrig’s speech was written just after being diagnosed with ALS. The purpose of the
speech was to inform the audience of the disease which had forced him to retire. Also,
Lou wanted to create a contrast between his ailment and career.
5. The persona that Lou portrays to the audience of multiple people is that he is the luckiest
man in the world. The popular baseball player, Lou Gehrig, views himself as just a
commoner who is grateful for his chances.
6. People should not be defined by what is happening in their lives, as with Lou Gehrig.
7. People gain ideas from different sources: some experiences are faced first hand while
others indirectly through the first person. In this case, the speech was influenced by Lou
Gehrig’s experience in his career.
8. The audience was Gehrig’s fellow athletes and his fans because they were the ones
concerned about his wellbeing. His main idea was for them not to forget about his legacy
in life.
9. The speech has rhetorical devices like pathos, logos, and ethos to explain his long career
and the fate of the disease.
Lou uses anaphoras and alliteration to ensure the audience enjoys the speech more for
instance, when he says, "who wouldn't consider it an honor to have known Jacob
Ruppert-
10. The entire Gehrig speech shows parallel structure. Lou had used two sentences that begin
and end equally with dashes between them which is parallelism.
Works Cited
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Surname 3
Gaff, Alan D. Lou Gehrig: The Lost Memoir. Simon & Schuster, 2020.
Antonick, Zach. "Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)."

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Surname 1 Name Professor Course Date 1. Lou Gehrig Gehrig was ranked third in RBIs (35) and 5th in Fall Classic homers (10). Lou Gehrig managed a 1.214 OPS in seven career World Series. 2. July 4, 1939. The country was on the path to recovery from the war in Europe and the Great Depression. Lou Gehrig had prepared himself to speak motivated by his previous marriage to Eleanor Twitchell, who had suggested the idea of the speech. Besides, Gehrig had been diagnosed with an ALS disease that had brought to an end his ballplaying career. Lou refers to the disease as a 'bad break ' because it had forced him to retire. 3. Lou Gehrig’s speech was from a positive tone and an optimistic one. Using pathos in the entire speech while explaining the disease creates a gloomy mood within the audience. Lou considers himself lucky despite facing a tough situation two weeks after being diagnosed with the disease. His attitude, however, is flippant, which makes the audience jealous of his life despite him battling ALS. Surname 2 4. Lou Gehrig’s speech was written just after being diagnosed with ALS. The purpose of the speech was to inform the audience of the disease which had forced him to retire. Also, Lou wanted to create a contrast between his ailment and career. 5. The persona that Lou portrays to the audience of multiple people is that he is the luckiest man in the world. The popular baseball player, Lou Gehrig, views himself as just a commoner who is grateful for his chances. 6. People should not be defined by what is happening in their lives, as with Lou Gehrig. 7. People gain ideas from different sources: some experiences are faced first hand while others indirectly through the first person. In this case, the speech was influenced by Lou Gehrig’s experience in his career. 8. The audience was Gehrig’s fellow athletes and his fans because they were the ones concerned about his wellbeing. His main idea was for them not to forget about his legacy in life. 9. The speech has rhetorical devices like pathos, logos, and ethos to explain his long career and the fate of the disease. Lou uses anaphoras and alliteration to ensure the audience enjoys the speech more for instance, when he says, "who wouldn't consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert-“ 10. The entire Gehrig speech shows parallel structure. Lou had used two sentences that begin and end equally with dashes between them which is parallelism. Works Cited Surname Gaff, Alan D. Lou Gehrig: The Lost Memoir. Simon & Schuster, 2020. Antonick, Zach. "Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)." 3 Name: Description: ...
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