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Buildings
NAME OF STUDENT
NAME OF PROFESSOR
DATE
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Abstract
Today's pressing worry has resulted in a trend toward building dwellings that are far smaller than
in the past. As a result, interior designers strive to use numerous design components in a space,
such as a form, volume, color, and light, to give the impression that the area is larger than it is.
While the techniques employed by interior designers do not affect the physical features of space,
they do create visual illusions that modify how people perceive space and commodiousness. The
goal of this study is to examine several design factors that might impact how people perceive the
size of a space. As a result, the goal of this study is to emphasize the relevance of all design
techniques and features that may be utilized to communicate a sense of spaciousness. Due to the
shortage of urban land and housing in general across the world, the trend is to reduce the size of
the houses on it. Environmental considerations, on the other hand, support the reduction of housing
unit size in order to preserve resources, cut energy use, and minimize emissions. The goal of this
study is to learn more about interior designers' abilities to use design techniques to communicate
a sense of spaciousness in interior spaces. The goal of this study is to look at the influence of
various design components in the sense of space size and comfort. It demonstrates that one's sense
of a room's commodiousness is an objective rather than a physical characteristic. The use of design
components such as shape, volume, color, and light may change how we perceive the size of a
space. The findings of the study were diverse. It was discovered that particular colors and patterns
influence how people view a location. The amount of natural and artificial lighting used in the
construction of commodious consciousness is quite important.
The perception of commodiousness can also be influenced by floor plans. Despite the fact that
many designers overlook it, room volume is another important component that determines how
humans perceive commodiousness. As a result, the physical features of space that define its
openness, permeability, and connectivity are critical to its functional effectiveness. At the same
time, it has a good and negative impact on its level of commodiousness.
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Comparison Between two buildings
The creation house Villa Mayfair
A world influenced by modern baroque, with somber blacks that allude to the notion of
memory Mori, golden ink as a hint to elegance, insects, flowers, and still-living creatures.
Villa Mayfair, located at 240 Va Augusta in Barcelona, was created by Enric Sagnier in
1910 and has always belonged to the Bertrand family.
Cristina Rodrguez fell in love with it in 2015, and its repair has given it a new lease on life.
The mansion, which is located in the heart of Barcelona, is made up of a three-story house
built in 1910 that pays homage to live in the 1900s while maintaining all of the modern
conveniences.
It is surrounded by the Indian-inspired gardens and under the garden 'La Galería’, a newly
constructed unique space at street level, versatile and suggestive.
Excellence has been sought gently at Villa Mayfair. The exuberance of the room is defined
by noble and discrete materials that integrate seamlessly as if they had always been there.
The impact is delicate and calming, as well as subtle and evocative. Villa Mayfair is set to
make a comeback.
Casa Mediterraneo
The building's structural framework, walls, high arched passages, elaborate molding, and
other details were retained and enhanced by being painted white.
The building's general U-shape architecture is well-suited to its intended role as an
assembly space. The program's core is a vast open Experiential space in the center of the
building.
High symmetrical archways on three sides separate the primary room from neighboring
smaller gathering spaces while maintaining an airy openness and connectedness.
The train station pavilions are daylit, naturally ventilated, and surrounded by plants grown
in ceramic pots.
The new Casa Mediterraneo offers a novel take on repurposing abandoned structures for
new functions in an era when all new construction initiatives are being constructed in a
sustainable manner.
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3
The office area has beautiful white daylighting, while the big hall changes colors depending
on the time of day.
Interview with the architect from Villa Mayfair
1. What were the particular design challenges encountered in adapting the building to
new purpose? How did you solve these?
Ans. When it came to the obstacles of adapting the building to new uses, the structural intervention
was critical, particularly the difficult-to-build concrete framework for the entire expansion, as well
as the tunnel linking this extension to the restoration. To make the Villa accessible, a tunnel/gallery
had to be excavated beneath the existing building, cutting through load-bearing walls, all facades,
and all structural elements of the 19
th
-century villa, and connecting it to an elevator up to street
level.
Interior space was rearranged to make room sizes more functional. There was formerly a service
staircase leading to the top floor in addition to the main one for family usage; we combined the
two to create a single, bigger staircase. In this way, we were able to reinforce the structure, install
additional facilities and contemporary amenities such as in-floor radiant heating, as well as
thoroughly clean and restore the interior and exterior.
2. It appears that light, a sense of open space, and flexibility of use were particular
concerns is that right? Please comment on these aspects or any others that were of
major concern.
Ans. This also has anything to do with your question concerning natural light. Finally, it's a
freestanding family home, with four orientations: north, south, east, and west, as well as huge
windows and enough of natural light. Internally, we've always sought to coordinate entrances and
exits, seeking for a symmetry that helps us to work more efficiently (unbroken views from one
side to the other). As an example, as you move upstairs, rearranging the gaps a bit to make it easier
to see from one place to the next. On the roof, for example, we added a big skylight that opens to
reveal the sky, which is half sloped and partially flat. If it rains, the skylight shutters
(automatically) since it is fitted with a humidity sensor... We also inserted three skylights in the
kitchen annex to provide the most natural light possible... the new room La Galeria, which has a
depth of about 10 meters, has a wide skylight that is the (underside of) the garden's pool. That is
Showing Page:
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4
to say, the bottom is made of methacrylate (plexiglass), which lets light in and creates a distinct
ambiance in the Gallery depending on the (sunlight situation above), whether it is bright or dark.
Whether the sky is cloudy or not, the time of day, the angle of the sun's rays based on the month
of the year, the reflections generated by running water... all of these factors can provide a rainbow
and reflections if the sky is clear. This is all quite good and allows for the creation of an area that
is similar to a garage but has a lot of natural light.
3. In what ways were old elements used as decor? How do these contribute to the new
narrative and/or how do these add to the appreciation of The Creation House as a
heritage building?
Ans. The original decorative components may mostly be seen on the façade of the villa known (by
the City) as Villa Mayfair, a structure created by architect Enric Sagnier in the early 1900s. It had
features including a colorful colored mosaic border around the top and modernist accents that were
popular at the time. However, the remaining details are relatively sparse, in keeping with the
family's attitude, which did not desire an overdone appearance.
Modernism in Catalonia, although only in a few elements. The rest of the features, such as colors
and whatnot, are quite evident. The mosaic on the top portion of the facade was in excellent
condition; it just had accumulated dirt and some climbing plants adhering to it, but after that was
removed, we discovered the mosaic to be in pristine shape with no missing pieces. It was more
than 100 years old and in perfect condition.
4. Were there particular aesthetic characteristics or other features of the surrounding
neighborhood that needed to be taken into consideration?
Ans. For the City's rich and gentrified families, it seemed like a village with single-family
residences, almost like summer. Villa is located on Va Augusta, a busy thoroughfare in Barcelona
that is currently surrounded by high-rise residential structures. Between these towers, it has
remained a hidden jewel. The plan was to breathe new life into it, to thoroughly restore it, and to
turn it into a garden. In the heart of the metropolis, a tiny oasis. However, it is vital not to overlook
the significance of the expansion created beneath the garden, which allows for vehicle access and
the inclusion of contemporary utilities, such as electric car charging stations.
Showing Page:
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5
My own interview responses for Casa M. (architect refused)
1. What original details or areas of the original structure were kept? How do these
elements
contribute to the function of the building as a convention or assembly venue? to the
building’s new narrative?
Ans. The building's structural backbone, walls, lofty arched passages, elaborate molding, and other
details were all preserved and enhanced by being painted white. The building's general U-shape
architecture is well-suited to its intended role as an assembly space. The program's core is a vast
open Experiential space in the center of the building. High symmetrical archways on three sides
separate the primary room from neighboring smaller gathering spaces while maintaining an airy
openness and connectedness.
2. What were the particular design challenges encountered in adapting the building to
its new purpose? How did you solve these?
Ans. The basic roof design remained the same, with central glass panels allowing direct sunlight
in and side panels made up of "Klein-blue" translucent panels that "filter the incoming sunlight,
which, after reverberating through a vibrant, circular-patterned aluminum lattice, dyes and excites
the old walls and floor, flooding the space and turning it into a sea of blue shadows."
3. It appears that light, a sense of open space, and flexibility of use were particular concerns
is that right? Please comment on these aspects or any others that were of major concern.
Ans. Interior components associated with prior railroad operations were removed, allowing for
more versatile use of the area for assembly and events. An open floor layout gives more flexibility
in accommodating various sorts of events. An objective was to maximize natural light in the main
room (Experiential Room). To fill the area with light, the roof panels were replaced with a Klein-
blue transparent material. For greater light, the ceiling over the outer aisles was opened with
windows.
Showing Page:
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6
3. In what ways were old elements used as decor? How do these contribute to the new
narrative and/or how do these add to the appreciation of CM as a heritage building?
Ans. The goal was to maintain a public building's history story while staying true to its original
era. The facade was left untouched, with the old clock above the main door being the most
prominent ornamental element. Train tracks and vendor stalls were removed on the inside, but the
structural skeleton was preserved.
5. Were there particular aesthetic characteristics or other features of the surrounding
neighborhood that needed to be taken into consideration?
Ans. The old surrounding structures, like other sites, have not been maintained. The historic
railroad station in Benalua is now surrounded by middle-class housing developments. When Casa
Mediteraneao purchased the property, the inhabitants of Alicante urged that the building's image
and legacy be preserved rather than lost.
References
Showing Page:
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7
Betti, M., Galano, L., & Vignoli, A. (2015). Time-history seismic analysis of masonry buildings:
A comparison between two non-linear modelling approaches. Buildings, 5(2), 597-621.
Asdrubali, F., Baldinelli, G., Bianchi, F., & Sambuco, S. (2015). A comparison between
environmental sustainability rating systems LEED and ITACA for residential buildings. Building
and Environment, 86, 98-108.
Sassoni, E., Mazzotti, C., & Pagliai, G. (2014). Comparison between experimental methods for
evaluating the compressive strength of existing masonry buildings. Construction and Building
Materials, 68, 206-219.
Sarto, L., Galante, A., & Pasetti, G. (2012). Comparison between predicted and actual energy
performance for winter heating in high-performance residential buildings in the Lombardy region
(Italy). Energy and buildings, 47, 247-253.
Good, C., Andresen, I., & Hestnes, A. G. (2015). Solar energy for net zero energy buildingsA
comparison between solar thermal, PV and photovoltaicthermal (PV/T) systems. Solar
Energy, 122, 986-996.
Zinzi, M., & Agnoli, S. (2012). Cool and green roofs. An energy and comfort comparison between
passive cooling and mitigation urban heat island techniques for residential buildings in the
Mediterranean region. Energy and Buildings, 55, 66-76.
Bahria, S., Amirat, M., Hamidat, A., El Ganaoui, M., & Slimani, M. E. A. (2016). Parametric study
of solar heating and cooling systems in different climates of AlgeriaA comparison between
conventional and high-energy-performance buildings. Energy, 113, 521-535.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Buildings NAME OF STUDENT NAME OF PROFESSOR DATE 1 Abstract Today's pressing worry has resulted in a trend toward building dwellings that are far smaller than in the past. As a result, interior designers strive to use numerous design components in a space, such as a form, volume, color, and light, to give the impression that the area is larger than it is. While the techniques employed by interior designers do not affect the physical features of space, they do create visual illusions that modify how people perceive space and commodiousness. The goal of this study is to examine several design factors that might impact how people perceive the size of a space. As a result, the goal of this study is to emphasize the relevance of all design techniques and features that may be utilized to communicate a sense of spaciousness. Due to the shortage of urban land and housing in general across the world, the trend is to reduce the size of the houses on it. Environmental considerations, on the other hand, support the reduction of housing unit size in order to preserve resources, cut energy use, and minimize emissions. The goal of this study is to learn more about interior designers' abilities to use design techniques to communicate a sense of spaciousness in interior spaces. The goal of this study is to look at the influence of various design components in the sense of space size and comfort. It demonstrates that one's sense of a room's commodiousness is an objective rather than a physical characteristic. The use of design components such as shape, volume, color, and light may change how we perceive the size of a space. The findings of the study were diverse. It was discovered that particular colors and patterns influence how people view a location. The amount of natural and artificial lighting used in the construction of commodious consciousness is quite important. The perception of commodiousness can also be influenced by floor plans. Despite the fact that many designers overlook it, room volume is another important component that determines how humans perceive commodiousness. As a result, the physical features of space that define its openness, permeability, and connectivity are critical to its functional effectiveness. At the same time, it has a good and negative impact on its level of commodiousness. 2 Comparison Between two buildings The creation house Villa Mayfair ➢ A world influenced by modern baroque, with somber blacks that allude to the notion of memory Mori, golden ink as a hint to elegance, insects, flowers, and still-living creatures. ➢ Villa Mayfair, located at 240 Va Augusta in Barcelona, was created by Enric Sagnier in 1910 and has always belonged to the Bertrand family. ➢ Cristina Rodrguez fell in love with it in 2015, and its repair has given it a new lease on life. ➢ The mansion, which is located in the heart of Barcelona, is made up of a three-story house built in 1910 that pays homage to live in the 1900s while maintaining all of the modern conveniences. ➢ It is surrounded by the Indian-inspired gardens and under the garden 'La Galería’, a newly constructed unique space at street level, versatile and suggestive. Excellence has been sought gently at Villa Mayfair. The exuberance of the room is defined by noble and discrete materials that integrate seamlessly as if they had always been there. The impact is delicate and calming, as well as subtle and evocative. Villa Mayfair is set to make a comeback. Casa Mediterraneo ➢ The building's structural framework, walls, high arched passages, elaborate molding, and other details were retained and enhanced by being painted white. ➢ The building's general U-shape architecture is well-suited to its intended role as an assembly space. The program's core is a vast open Experiential space in the center of the building. ➢ High symmetrical archways on three sides separate the primary room from neighboring smaller gathering spaces while maintaining an airy openness and connectedness. ➢ The train station pavilions are daylit, naturally ventilated, and surrounded by plants grown in ceramic pots. ➢ The new Casa Mediterraneo offers a novel take on repurposing abandoned structures for new functions in an era when all new construction initiatives are being constructed in a sustainable manner. 3 ➢ The office area has beautiful white daylighting, while the big hall changes colors depending on the time of day. Interview with the architect from Villa Mayfair 1. What were the particular design challenges encountered in adapting the building to new purpose? How did you solve these? Ans. When it came to the obstacles of adapting the building to new uses, the structural intervention was critical, particularly the difficult-to-build concrete framework for the entire expansion, as well as the tunnel linking this extension to the restoration. To make the Villa accessible, a tunnel/gallery had to be excavated beneath the existing building, cutting through load-bearing walls, all facades, and all structural elements of the 19th-century villa, and connecting it to an elevator up to street level. Interior space was rearranged to make room sizes more functional. There was formerly a service staircase leading to the top floor in addition to the main one for family usage; we combined the two to create a single, bigger staircase. In this way, we were able to reinforce the structure, install additional facilities and contemporary amenities such as in-floor radiant heating, as well as thoroughly clean and restore the interior and exterior. 2. It appears that light, a sense of open space, and flexibility of use were particular concerns – is that right? Please comment on these aspects or any others that were of major concern. Ans. This also has anything to do with your question concerning natural light. Finally, it's a freestanding family home, with four orientations: north, south, east, and west, as well as huge windows and enough of natural light. Internally, we've always sought to coordinate entrances and exits, seeking for a symmetry that helps us to work more efficiently (unbroken views from one side to the other). As an example, as you move upstairs, rearranging the gaps a bit to make it easier to see from one place to the next. On the roof, for example, we added a big skylight that opens to reveal the sky, which is half sloped and partially flat. If it rains, the skylight shutters (automatically) since it is fitted with a humidity sensor... We also inserted three skylights in the kitchen annex to provide the most natural light possible... the new room La Galeria, which has a depth of about 10 meters, has a wide skylight that is the (underside of) the garden's pool. That is 4 to say, the bottom is made of methacrylate (plexiglass), which lets light in and creates a distinct ambiance in the Gallery depending on the (sunlight situation above), whether it is bright or dark. Whether the sky is cloudy or not, the time of day, the angle of the sun's rays based on the month of the year, the reflections generated by running water... all of these factors can provide a rainbow and reflections if the sky is clear. This is all quite good and allows for the creation of an area that is similar to a garage but has a lot of natural light. 3. In what ways were old elements used as decor? How do these contribute to the new narrative and/or how do these add to the appreciation of The Creation House as a heritage building? Ans. The original decorative components may mostly be seen on the façade of the villa known (by the City) as Villa Mayfair, a structure created by architect Enric Sagnier in the early 1900s. It had features including a colorful colored mosaic border around the top and modernist accents that were popular at the time. However, the remaining details are relatively sparse, in keeping with the family's attitude, which did not desire an overdone appearance. Modernism in Catalonia, although only in a few elements. The rest of the features, such as colors and whatnot, are quite evident. The mosaic on the top portion of the facade was in excellent condition; it just had accumulated dirt and some climbing plants adhering to it, but after that was removed, we discovered the mosaic to be in pristine shape with no missing pieces. It was more than 100 years old and in perfect condition. 4. Were there particular aesthetic characteristics or other features of the surrounding neighborhood that needed to be taken into consideration? Ans. For the City's rich and gentrified families, it seemed like a village with single-family residences, almost like summer. Villa is located on Va Augusta, a busy thoroughfare in Barcelona that is currently surrounded by high-rise residential structures. Between these towers, it has remained a hidden jewel. The plan was to breathe new life into it, to thoroughly restore it, and to turn it into a garden. In the heart of the metropolis, a tiny oasis. However, it is vital not to overlook the significance of the expansion created beneath the garden, which allows for vehicle access and the inclusion of contemporary utilities, such as electric car charging stations. 5 My own interview responses for Casa M. (architect refused) 1. What original details or areas of the original structure were kept? How do these elements contribute to the function of the building as a convention or assembly venue? to the building’s new narrative? Ans. The building's structural backbone, walls, lofty arched passages, elaborate molding, and other details were all preserved and enhanced by being painted white. The building's general U-shape architecture is well-suited to its intended role as an assembly space. The program's core is a vast open Experiential space in the center of the building. High symmetrical archways on three sides separate the primary room from neighboring smaller gathering spaces while maintaining an airy openness and connectedness. 2. What were the particular design challenges encountered in adapting the building to its new purpose? How did you solve these? Ans. The basic roof design remained the same, with central glass panels allowing direct sunlight in and side panels made up of "Klein-blue" translucent panels that "filter the incoming sunlight, which, after reverberating through a vibrant, circular-patterned aluminum lattice, dyes and excites the old walls and floor, flooding the space and turning it into a sea of blue shadows." 3. It appears that light, a sense of open space, and flexibility of use were particular concerns – is that right? Please comment on these aspects or any others that were of major concern. Ans. Interior components associated with prior railroad operations were removed, allowing for more versatile use of the area for assembly and events. An open floor layout gives more flexibility in accommodating various sorts of events. An objective was to maximize natural light in the main room (Experiential Room). To fill the area with light, the roof panels were replaced with a Kleinblue transparent material. For greater light, the ceiling over the outer aisles was opened with windows. 6 3. In what ways were old elements used as decor? How do these contribute to the new narrative and/or how do these add to the appreciation of CM as a heritage building? Ans. The goal was to maintain a public building's history story while staying true to its original era. The facade was left untouched, with the old clock above the main door being the most prominent ornamental element. Train tracks and vendor stalls were removed on the inside, but the structural skeleton was preserved. 5. Were there particular aesthetic characteristics or other features of the surrounding neighborhood that needed to be taken into consideration? Ans. The old surrounding structures, like other sites, have not been maintained. The historic railroad station in Benalua is now surrounded by middle-class housing developments. When Casa Mediteraneao purchased the property, the inhabitants of Alicante urged that the building's image and legacy be preserved rather than lost. References 7 Betti, M., Galano, L., & Vignoli, A. (2015). Time-history seismic analysis of masonry buildings: A comparison between two non-linear modelling approaches. Buildings, 5(2), 597-621. Asdrubali, F., Baldinelli, G., Bianchi, F., & Sambuco, S. (2015). A comparison between environmental sustainability rating systems LEED and ITACA for residential buildings. Building and Environment, 86, 98-108. Sassoni, E., Mazzotti, C., & Pagliai, G. (2014). Comparison between experimental methods for evaluating the compressive strength of existing masonry buildings. Construction and Building Materials, 68, 206-219. Sarto, L., Galante, A., & Pasetti, G. (2012). Comparison between predicted and actual energy performance for winter heating in high-performance residential buildings in the Lombardy region (Italy). Energy and buildings, 47, 247-253. Good, C., Andresen, I., & Hestnes, A. G. (2015). Solar energy for net zero energy buildings–A comparison between solar thermal, PV and photovoltaic–thermal (PV/T) systems. Solar Energy, 122, 986-996. Zinzi, M., & Agnoli, S. (2012). Cool and green roofs. An energy and comfort comparison between passive cooling and mitigation urban heat island techniques for residential buildings in the Mediterranean region. Energy and Buildings, 55, 66-76. Bahria, S., Amirat, M., Hamidat, A., El Ganaoui, M., & Slimani, M. E. A. (2016). Parametric study of solar heating and cooling systems in different climates of Algeria–A comparison between conventional and high-energy-performance buildings. Energy, 113, 521-535. Name: Description: ...
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