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Group Industry Report Supply Chain
Name
Student ID
Institution
Professor
Course
Date
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Introduction of Supply Chain Management as it Relates to Covid 19 Pre and Post.
A new COV-SARS-2 illness, COVID-19, has been rapidly spreading throughout the globe
during the past several months, causing significant uncertainty and unavoidable disruptions in
the global supply chain. Food and medical tools, including masks and drugs, are in great demand
for the treatment, prevention, and control of the outbreak, according to WHO. Also, pandemic-
control measures adopted by nations across the world have disrupted the flow of completed raw
materials and commodities to numerous nations across the world. The global supply network has
always been sensitive to shocks that occur in the major exporting countries, and that hasn't
changed. We've seen it all: trade wars, COVID-19 pandemics, and political upheaval at home.
Due to issues that might impair the smooth exporting nations' primary import trade partners'
products and services., these countries are at risk of losing their competitive edge. COVID-19
has interrupted worldwide economic and industrial activity.
As a health strategy, many countries have implemented lockdown measures to limit the spread of
a pandemic. A number of the COVID-19's lockdown measures have led to production halts,
restrictions on the movement of people or products, border closures, logistical problems, and a
delay in trade and commercial operations. It was reported to the World Health Organization
(WHO) office in China for the first time on 31 December 2019. More than 22.1 million instances
have been recorded as of August 17th, 2020. Growth in China, one of the world's major
manufacturing and distribution hubs, affects the supply of finished and nearly full goods to
regions across the globe that rely on China for trade. Covidien-19's effect on the supply chain
sector.
To reduce the dangers of external disruptions from the lockdown measures, several nations are
looking inside and revising supply-chain tactics, while multinational firms are reworking their
outsourcing plans for critical inputs for local operations to offset those risks. A growing number
of developed country governments are urging companies to carefully consider methods that will
provide resilience in the event of potential disruptions to the world's supply and company supply.
Applications and Suggestions of Different Strategies in Post Covid-19 Supply Chain
Activities
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However, most research on COVID-19 has focused on the antecedents or possible
consequences/effects of COVID-19on supply chain disruption, disregarding what businesses
may do or have done to minimize how COVID-19 will affect the market networks. To begin, the
data show that businesses may adapt to COVID-19 disruptions by adopting agile manufacturing.
A lack of direct materials and inventories means that companies should prioritize what
productions need to be created. First and foremost, the pandemic has hurt the company's
operations. As a result, companies are encouraged to design and implement new business
continuity plans. To avoid supply-side risks, companies may want to consider relocating from
one location to another. Because of COVID-19, customers' relationships with their suppliers
have deteriorated, resulting in a lack of visibility for expanding supply networks. And it has an
impact on how well a company can assess and manage risk.
It's important for companies to build good relationships with their major suppliers and to
implement a system that gives better insight across their extended supply network. Data research
also reveals that businesses must focus on agile production to keep up with global demand as fast
as possible, as well. Investment in supply chain planning should also be made by companies so
that they can better deal with any unforeseen circumstances that may occur in the future. There's
also evidence that some companies' expanded supplier networks aren't as visible as they should
be. Firms should also use new digital techniques to obtain access to their expanded supplier
chain. As a result, companies will be able to identify any crucial supply in the shortest amount of
time. Companies would also be able to anticipate any dangers.
In addition, some companies may not have a comprehensive inventory management system in
place. As a result, companies must know how much inventory they have with their suppliers and
how much stock they have outside of direct material. To maximize client allocation, firms should
also predict if they will run out of any finished items. Finally, COVID-19 has wreaked havoc on
logistics management. Trucks, truck drivers, and freight are in limited supply for logistics firms.
Companies must create a flexible logistic network and choose alternate routes to ensure a
seamless flow of goods in this environment. There would be a period of adjustment before the
logistical operations were back on track, but prompt action would be crucial to the firm's
business operations and its ability to remain successful.
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Applications and Suggestions of Different Technologies in Post Covid-19 Supply Chain
Activities
For a real cyber-physical distribution chain, the Internet of Things is essential (IoT), are a sensor,
actuators, and other devices. Supply chain operations may be self-executing and regulated if they
link themselves with other technologies, such as cloud computing, machine learning, or robotics.
A higher inventory coverage may be achieved by increasing the responsiveness of providers in
the upstream supply chain. As a result, cloud-based data and information about the supply chain
are quicker, transparent, and more visible. As a result of this real-time visibility of information,
factories may be able to respond more quickly to orders from a cloud platform or even
automatically accept orders to make items. In conjunction with IoT, robots, and artificial
intelligence, this information might be used to intelligently produce things in the future. In
addition to enhancing production flexibility, additive manufacturing might also be used to
enhance supply chain responsiveness and efficiency by producing in a mass-customized fashion.
Determining the best way to reduce downtimes and setup times is another major goal of
augmented reality in the manufacturing setting.
There are benefits to the supply chain's flow downstream. Demand from dealers and end
consumers may be conveyed to distribution facilities directly as a result of cloud computing, IoT,
and robotics (e.g. put-away, receiving, dispatching, picking). This might have a substantial
impact on the delivery supply chain's efficiency and responsiveness. Blockchain technology may
have a positive impact on deliveries. As a result, a supply chain is more dependable and
responsive when it is transparent, traceable, and secure.
Supply chain technology generates a huge volume of data. And big data analytics is crucial in
gathering data from all of these technologies and translating them into information, which is then
sequenced and analyzed to provide knowledge and understanding. A true knowledge-based
supply chain is possible with big data analytics, allowing supply chain managers to make more
rapid and assertive decisions in the face of an impending disruption event. To be clear, all of the
technologies described above must be compatible. Communication and integration amongst
technologies (interoperability) are needed for the technological levers to work effectively.
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According to earlier discussions, supply chain management should pay attention to managerial
and capability concerns to be successful in implementing the Supply Chain 4.0 strategy.
Management in supply chain management should also link the appropriate technology with each
supply chain's process needs to obtain the desired enhancement on its technical specifications
Challenges of Applying Technologies in the Post Covid 19 Supply Chain
Unemployment and underemployment are two of the main threats to adopting disruptive
technology. If the demand for internet services increases, as a result, these findings can be
constrained, limiting firms' adoption of disruptive technology. In addition, increasing disparities
might prevent individuals, especially women, from adopting new technology. There is a greater
likelihood that women will be disproportionately affected by technological developments than
males, as COVID-19 is projected to do. There is a high probability that cybersecurity threats will
rise as the usage of digital services expands. This will hurt society's faith in disruptive
technology. There was a week of network assaults in South Africa during the shutdown that
affected as many as 300.000 mobile devices. By strengthening the first-mover advantage,
COVID-19 may also hinder the growth of technological startups. In addition, privacy problems
must be addressed to secure people's data.
Other dangers for emerging market technology businesses include restricted access to venture
funding, strengthening the first-mover advantage, and a prolonged pandemic, among others. Due
to venture capital firms' focus on existing portfolio businesses and the adjustment of their reserve
capital, start-ups may not be able to get venture funding. In times of crisis, venture capital
transactions tend to dry up, preventing start-ups with little resources to continue developing in
anticipation of a rebound. Startups in the poorest countries, like Africa, maybe more robust since
they had to reconcile expansion with profitability and good cash flow before the COVID-19
crisis, which may have made them more resilient. For starters, cash-saving initiatives and
efficient working capital management will be increasingly important. In developing economies,
there are still significant hurdles to a digital connection that might delay the adoption of
disruptive technologies, such as the availability of inexpensive, high-quality internet access and
the degree of digital skills among the bulk of official and informal employees. On the other hand,
Twenty-percent fewer women are using Internet Services and digitalization to counterbalance the
Showing Page:
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economic impact of the epidemic, making up the bulk of the unconnected population in
emerging nations. In addition, COVID-19 may contribute to an increase in the digital divide by
delaying the diffusion of new technologies.
Conclusion and Overall Appraisal of Post Covid 19 Supply Chain Strategies and
Technologies.
Faced with a growing gap between low- and middle-income nations due to a lack of access to
capital and digital skills, there is potential for targeted interventions that allow technology
businesses to expand up while limiting the danger of increasing the technological divide in
emerging economies. Potential interventions have been identified through discussions with the
market players and portfolio businesses of the International Finance Corporation. These include
promoting public-private partnerships, supporting local investment funds, and coordinating
regulatory policies and taxation between offline and online services, among other things. Even if
technology adoption is more amenable to private sector approaches such as R&D and corporate
governance, it might be used to supplement these government-driven efforts. Many other
players, particularly multilateral development banks and development finance organizations, can
contribute to their improvement as well.
They may do this by matching cash raised from private investors and development finance
institutions. Examples include repurposing government-allocated money or subsidies that were
formerly allocated to Angel and seed investor groups which can be matched with public
incubators and accelerators. In addition to these initiatives, governments may invest in a set of
digital enablement pillars. As part of this plan, the government will establish a digital ID system,
connect schools and universities to the internet, and encourage partnerships with private sector
players to enhance technical education and preparedness through online coursework and exams
(rather than building their own), as well as support private higher education institutions that offer
specialized technology programs.
Particularly in nations with a high level of internet connection, public-private partnerships
(PPPs) can be hastened. As part of normal government activities, such as the collecting of taxes
and fees, technology businesses can assist in the delivery of public services to sectors including
Showing Page:
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health care, transportation, and educational institutions. Services like worker upskilling, drug
tracking and bike or vehicle sharing in cities are all examples of PPPs. Because most competition
and innovation rules were created to govern conventional firms, they might be more closely
linked with the operation of digital companies. For technological start-ups, the merger control
might be loosened to offer them exit possibilities. Technological businesses could innovate faster
if intellectual property rules were more flexible, especially if copyrights on digital material were
standardized across several nations.
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8/8
References
1. Hofmann, H.; Busse, C.; Bode, C.; Henke, M. Sustainability-related supply chain risks:
Conceptualization and management. Bus.
Strategy Environ. 2014, 23, 160172. [CrossRef]
2. Yaghlane, A.B.; Azaiez, M.N. Systems under attack-survivability rather than reliability:
Concept, results, and applications. Eur. J.
Oper. Res. 2017, 258, 11561164. [CrossRef]
3. Shareef, M.A.; Dwivedi, Y.K.; Mahmud, R.; Wright, A.; Rahman, M.M.; Kizgin, H.; Rana,
N.P. Disaster management in Bangladesh:
Developing an effective emergency supply chain network. Ann. Oper. Res. 2019, 283, 1463
1487. [CrossRef]
4. Yu, K.D.S.; Aviso, K.B. Modelling the economic impact and ripple effects of disease
outbreaks. Process Integr. Optim. Sustain. 2020, 4, 183186. [CrossRef]
5. Ivanov, D. Predicting the impacts of epidemic outbreaks on global supply chains: A
simulation-based analysis on the coronavirus
outbreak (COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2) case. Transp. Res. Part E Logist. Transp. Rev. 2020, 136,
101922. [CrossRef]

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Group Industry Report Supply Chain Name Student ID Institution Professor Course Date Introduction of Supply Chain Management as it Relates to Covid 19 Pre and Post. A new COV-SARS-2 illness, COVID-19, has been rapidly spreading throughout the globe during the past several months, causing significant uncertainty and unavoidable disruptions in the global supply chain. Food and medical tools, including masks and drugs, are in great demand for the treatment, prevention, and control of the outbreak, according to WHO. Also, pandemiccontrol measures adopted by nations across the world have disrupted the flow of completed raw materials and commodities to numerous nations across the world. The global supply network has always been sensitive to shocks that occur in the major exporting countries, and that hasn't changed. We've seen it all: trade wars, COVID-19 pandemics, and political upheaval at home. Due to issues that might impair the smooth exporting nations' primary import trade partners' products and services., these countries are at risk of losing their competitive edge. COVID-19 has interrupted worldwide economic and industrial activity. As a health strategy, many countries have implemented lockdown measures to limit the spread of a pandemic. A number of the COVID-19's lockdown measures have led to production halts, restrictions on the movement of people or products, border closures, logistical problems, and a delay in trade and commercial operations. It was reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) office in China for the first time on 31 December 2019. More than 22.1 million instances have been recorded as of August 17th, 2020. Growth in China, one of the world's major manufacturing and distribution hubs, affects the supply of finished and nearly full goods to regions across the globe that rely on China for trade. Covidien-19's effect on the supply chain sector. To reduce the dangers of external disruptions from the lockdown measures, several nations are looking inside and revising supply-chain tactics, while multinational firms are reworking their outsourcing plans for critical inputs for local operations to offset those risks. A growing number of developed country governments are urging companies to carefully consider methods that will provide resilience in the event of potential disruptions to the world's supply and company supply. Applications and Suggestions of Different Strategies in Post Covid-19 Supply Chain Activities However, most research on COVID-19 has focused on the antecedents or possible consequences/effects of COVID-19on supply chain disruption, disregarding what businesses may do or have done to minimize how COVID-19 will affect the market networks. To begin, the data show that businesses may adapt to COVID-19 disruptions by adopting agile manufacturing. A lack of direct materials and inventories means that companies should prioritize what productions need to be created. First and foremost, the pandemic has hurt the company's operations. As a result, companies are encouraged to design and implement new business continuity plans. To avoid supply-side risks, companies may want to consider relocating from one location to another. Because of COVID-19, customers' relationships with their suppliers have deteriorated, resulting in a lack of visibility for expanding supply networks. And it has an impact on how well a company can assess and manage risk. It's important for companies to build good relationships with their major suppliers and to implement a system that gives better insight across their extended supply network. Data research also reveals that businesses must focus on agile production to keep up with global demand as fast as possible, as well. Investment in supply chain planning should also be made by companies so that they can better deal with any unforeseen circumstances that may occur in the future. There's also evidence that some companies' expanded supplier networks aren't as visible as they should be. Firms should also use new digital techniques to obtain access to their expanded supplier chain. As a result, companies will be able to identify any crucial supply in the shortest amount of time. Companies would also be able to anticipate any dangers. In addition, some companies may not have a comprehensive inventory management system in place. As a result, companies must know how much inventory they have with their suppliers and how much stock they have outside of direct material. To maximize client allocation, firms should also predict if they will run out of any finished items. Finally, COVID-19 has wreaked havoc on logistics management. Trucks, truck drivers, and freight are in limited supply for logistics firms. Companies must create a flexible logistic network and choose alternate routes to ensure a seamless flow of goods in this environment. There would be a period of adjustment before the logistical operations were back on track, but prompt action would be crucial to the firm's business operations and its ability to remain successful. Applications and Suggestions of Different Technologies in Post Covid-19 Supply Chain Activities For a real cyber-physical distribution chain, the Internet of Things is essential (IoT), are a sensor, actuators, and other devices. Supply chain operations may be self-executing and regulated if they link themselves with other technologies, such as cloud computing, machine learning, or robotics. A higher inventory coverage may be achieved by increasing the responsiveness of providers in the upstream supply chain. As a result, cloud-based data and information about the supply chain are quicker, transparent, and more visible. As a result of this real-time visibility of information, factories may be able to respond more quickly to orders from a cloud platform or even automatically accept orders to make items. In conjunction with IoT, robots, and artificial intelligence, this information might be used to intelligently produce things in the future. In addition to enhancing production flexibility, additive manufacturing might also be used to enhance supply chain responsiveness and efficiency by producing in a mass-customized fashion. Determining the best way to reduce downtimes and setup times is another major goal of augmented reality in the manufacturing setting. There are benefits to the supply chain's flow downstream. Demand from dealers and end consumers may be conveyed to distribution facilities directly as a result of cloud computing, IoT, and robotics (e.g. put-away, receiving, dispatching, picking). This might have a substantial impact on the delivery supply chain's efficiency and responsiveness. Blockchain technology may have a positive impact on deliveries. As a result, a supply chain is more dependable and responsive when it is transparent, traceable, and secure. Supply chain technology generates a huge volume of data. And big data analytics is crucial in gathering data from all of these technologies and translating them into information, which is then sequenced and analyzed to provide knowledge and understanding. A true knowledge-based supply chain is possible with big data analytics, allowing supply chain managers to make more rapid and assertive decisions in the face of an impending disruption event. To be clear, all of the technologies described above must be compatible. Communication and integration amongst technologies (interoperability) are needed for the technological levers to work effectively. According to earlier discussions, supply chain management should pay attention to managerial and capability concerns to be successful in implementing the Supply Chain 4.0 strategy. Management in supply chain management should also link the appropriate technology with each supply chain's process needs to obtain the desired enhancement on its technical specifications Challenges of Applying Technologies in the Post Covid 19 Supply Chain Unemployment and underemployment are two of the main threats to adopting disruptive technology. If the demand for internet services increases, as a result, these findings can be constrained, limiting firms' adoption of disruptive technology. In addition, increasing disparities might prevent individuals, especially women, from adopting new technology. There is a greater likelihood that women will be disproportionately affected by technological developments than males, as COVID-19 is projected to do. There is a high probability that cybersecurity threats will rise as the usage of digital services expands. This will hurt society's faith in disruptive technology. There was a week of network assaults in South Africa during the shutdown that affected as many as 300.000 mobile devices. By strengthening the first-mover advantage, COVID-19 may also hinder the growth of technological startups. In addition, privacy problems must be addressed to secure people's data. Other dangers for emerging market technology businesses include restricted access to venture funding, strengthening the first-mover advantage, and a prolonged pandemic, among others. Due to venture capital firms' focus on existing portfolio businesses and the adjustment of their reserve capital, start-ups may not be able to get venture funding. In times of crisis, venture capital transactions tend to dry up, preventing start-ups with little resources to continue developing in anticipation of a rebound. Startups in the poorest countries, like Africa, maybe more robust since they had to reconcile expansion with profitability and good cash flow before the COVID-19 crisis, which may have made them more resilient. For starters, cash-saving initiatives and efficient working capital management will be increasingly important. In developing economies, there are still significant hurdles to a digital connection that might delay the adoption of disruptive technologies, such as the availability of inexpensive, high-quality internet access and the degree of digital skills among the bulk of official and informal employees. On the other hand, Twenty-percent fewer women are using Internet Services and digitalization to counterbalance the economic impact of the epidemic, making up the bulk of the unconnected population in emerging nations. In addition, COVID-19 may contribute to an increase in the digital divide by delaying the diffusion of new technologies. Conclusion and Overall Appraisal of Post Covid 19 Supply Chain Strategies and Technologies. Faced with a growing gap between low- and middle-income nations due to a lack of access to capital and digital skills, there is potential for targeted interventions that allow technology businesses to expand up while limiting the danger of increasing the technological divide in emerging economies. Potential interventions have been identified through discussions with the market players and portfolio businesses of the International Finance Corporation. These include promoting public-private partnerships, supporting local investment funds, and coordinating regulatory policies and taxation between offline and online services, among other things. Even if technology adoption is more amenable to private sector approaches such as R&D and corporate governance, it might be used to supplement these government-driven efforts. Many other players, particularly multilateral development banks and development finance organizations, can contribute to their improvement as well. They may do this by matching cash raised from private investors and development finance institutions. Examples include repurposing government-allocated money or subsidies that were formerly allocated to Angel and seed investor groups which can be matched with public incubators and accelerators. In addition to these initiatives, governments may invest in a set of digital enablement pillars. As part of this plan, the government will establish a digital ID system, connect schools and universities to the internet, and encourage partnerships with private sector players to enhance technical education and preparedness through online coursework and exams (rather than building their own), as well as support private higher education institutions that offer specialized technology programs. Particularly in nations with a high level of internet connection, public-private partnerships (PPPs) can be hastened. As part of normal government activities, such as the collecting of taxes and fees, technology businesses can assist in the delivery of public services to sectors including health care, transportation, and educational institutions. Services like worker upskilling, drug tracking and bike or vehicle sharing in cities are all examples of PPPs. Because most competition and innovation rules were created to govern conventional firms, they might be more closely linked with the operation of digital companies. For technological start-ups, the merger control might be loosened to offer them exit possibilities. Technological businesses could innovate faster if intellectual property rules were more flexible, especially if copyrights on digital material were standardized across several nations. References 1. Hofmann, H.; Busse, C.; Bode, C.; Henke, M. Sustainability-related supply chain risks: Conceptualization and management. Bus. Strategy Environ. 2014, 23, 160–172. [CrossRef] 2. Yaghlane, A.B.; Azaiez, M.N. Systems under attack-survivability rather than reliability: Concept, results, and applications. Eur. J. Oper. Res. 2017, 258, 1156–1164. [CrossRef] 3. Shareef, M.A.; Dwivedi, Y.K.; Mahmud, R.; Wright, A.; Rahman, M.M.; Kizgin, H.; Rana, N.P. Disaster management in Bangladesh: Developing an effective emergency supply chain network. Ann. Oper. Res. 2019, 283, 1463– 1487. [CrossRef] 4. Yu, K.D.S.; Aviso, K.B. Modelling the economic impact and ripple effects of disease outbreaks. Process Integr. Optim. Sustain. 2020, 4, 183–186. [CrossRef] 5. Ivanov, D. Predicting the impacts of epidemic outbreaks on global supply chains: A simulation-based analysis on the coronavirus outbreak (COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2) case. Transp. Res. Part E Logist. Transp. Rev. 2020, 136, 101922. [CrossRef] Name: Description: ...
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