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Solo Synthesis Paper
Name of the student
Institution affiliation
Lecturer
Course
Date
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Solo Synthesis Paper
Ariel et al. (2018) described self-regulated learning strategies are research-based
instructional techniques to help learners monitor and manage their learning skills and habits.
When paired with strategy instruction and metacognitive processes, instructors have a
powerful learning toolkit to share with learners. Instead of forcing material into students'
minds, retrieval exercise helps them remember it better. Retrieval practice is similar to
learning a language or an instrument in that it encourages pupils to "use it or lose it." A
"desirable difficulty" is a positive thing for learning regarding retrieval exercise. Improved
learners' self-awareness is facilitated by retrieval practice. Teaching methods incorporating
technology and digital media with conventional classroom activities, such as blended
learning, allow students to tailor their learning experiences. Even though there are four
primary types of blended learning, the options for incorporating instructional technology into
a teacher's pedagogical approach are almost infinite. One blended learning paradigm is the
flipped classroom, in which students see lecture material before class and then work on tasks
under the instructor's guidance during the course. My paper proposes that repeated retrieval
practice, self-control, and the application of high self-regulatory strategies with the right
attributes in a self-regulatory blended education environment are crucial to maximizing
students' performance.
However, when it comes to regulating their learning, students employ retrieval
practice ineffectively because they don't understand its importance (Ariel et al., 2018). As
part of their research, Ariel et al. (2018) investigated the effectiveness of a necessary
intervention targeted at enhancing students' self-regulated use of repeated retrieval practice
via a series of trials. Student decision-making was examined in two studies. They choose
whether to study, participate in retrieval practice, or discontinue learning a set of foreign
language word pairs in English. In their study, Zhu et al. (2016) emphasize the relevance of
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students' self-control, the application of self-regulatory mechanisms, and course involvement
(in this instance, online engagement) in a blended learning environment, particularly in
higher education. The international trend toward lifelong learning believes that learners must
be more autonomous, self-controlled, and self-regulated to attain learning objectives. The
claim is supported by research. Compared to elementary and secondary teaching approaches,
tertiary students are supposed to be self-regulated learners since most learning activities were
accomplished with less regularly monitoring from lecturers or tutors.
A blended course delivery model is widely used in universities (Zhu et al., 2016).
This development implies that students should use self-regulatory strategies effectively to
help themselves learn better. Therefore, self-control and self-regulatory learning skills are
essential for students' success in such a learning environment. The students with a low level
of self-control or self-regulatory learning skills may have more difficulty completing online
or blended courses. Teachers must identify such at-risk students before the beginning of a
system. Therefore, teachers can either provide more support for these students or direct them
to choose courses with more face-to-face instructional sessions. Despite the popularity of
blended study, it remains unclear whether these environments are successful, and if they are,
which attributes make them successful (Van Laer & Elen, 2017). An important observation
made by Van Laer and Elen (2017) is that blended learning seems to be especially
challenging for learners with lower self-regulatory abilities. Still, the opposite is true: those
who can regulate their learning do well in these environments. According to a growing body
of research, blended learning environments have varying effects on learning for different
kinds of learners. Those with poorer self-regulatory skills may find it challenging to keep up
with the demands of blended learning because of its strain on their capacity to self-regulate.
However, the inverse is also true: learners who thrive in situations characterized by high
levels of learner conflict would benefit most from blended learning settings.
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According to Ariel et al. (2018), An emphasis on mnemonic advantages rather than a
less successful method (restudying) was made in repeated directions to students, stating that
they should remember a translation accurately three times throughout the learning process.
Compared to a control group that received no training, this minor intervention produced more
successful self-regulated retrieval practice and more excellent retention of the translations.
Students who received this intervention also exhibited signs of long-term learning changes:
When they learned new content a week later, they employed the same kind of retrieval
practice (Van Laer & Elen, 2017). A good combination of a blended environment and
repeated retrieval practices will likely improve students’ performance.
To design blended learning environments that support self-regulation and thus make
learning more effective, we first need to determine the attributes of such environments. A
series of methods can be applied to improve students' self-control, and self-regulated learning
skills, such as classroom management, training on self-regulation and self-monitoring, self-
regulated learning prompts, personalized learning, and self-reflecting and self-evaluating
skills. It is important for university educators to further explore how to improve students'
skills of using self-regulated learning strategies and support students to become self-regulated
learners, not only at the stage of university study but also for a long-term goal of life-long
learning.
References
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Ariel, R., & Karpicke, J. D. (2018). Improving self-regulated learning with a retrieval
practice intervention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 24(1), 43.
Van Laer, S., & Elen, J. (2017). In Search of Attributes That Support Self-Regulation in
Blended Learning Environments. Education and Information Technologies, 22(4),
1395-1454.
Zhu, Y., Au, W., & Yates, G. (2016). University Students' Self-Control and Self-Regulated
Learning in A Blended Course. The Internet and Higher Education, 30, 54-62.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Solo Synthesis Paper Name of the student Institution affiliation Lecturer Course Date 2 Solo Synthesis Paper Ariel et al. (2018) described self-regulated learning strategies are research-based instructional techniques to help learners monitor and manage their learning skills and habits. When paired with strategy instruction and metacognitive processes, instructors have a powerful learning toolkit to share with learners. Instead of forcing material into students' minds, retrieval exercise helps them remember it better. Retrieval practice is similar to learning a language or an instrument in that it encourages pupils to "use it or lose it." A "desirable difficulty" is a positive thing for learning regarding retrieval exercise. Improved learners' self-awareness is facilitated by retrieval practice. Teaching methods incorporating technology and digital media with conventional classroom activities, such as blended learning, allow students to tailor their learning experiences. Even though there are four primary types of blended learning, the options for incorporating instructional technology into a teacher's pedagogical approach are almost infinite. One blended learning paradigm is the flipped classroom, in which students see lecture material before class and then work on tasks under the instructor's guidance during the course. My paper proposes that repeated retrieval practice, self-control, and the application of high self-regulatory strategies with the right attributes in a self-regulatory blended education environment are crucial to maximizing students' performance. However, when it comes to regulating their learning, students employ retrieval practice ineffectively because they don't understand its importance (Ariel et al., 2018). As part of their research, Ariel et al. (2018) investigated the effectiveness of a necessary intervention targeted at enhancing students' self-regulated use of repeated retrieval practice via a series of trials. Student decision-making was examined in two studies. They choose whether to study, participate in retrieval practice, or discontinue learning a set of foreign language word pairs in English. In their study, Zhu et al. (2016) emphasize the relevance of 3 students' self-control, the application of self-regulatory mechanisms, and course involvement (in this instance, online engagement) in a blended learning environment, particularly in higher education. The international trend toward lifelong learning believes that learners must be more autonomous, self-controlled, and self-regulated to attain learning objectives. The claim is supported by research. Compared to elementary and secondary teaching approaches, tertiary students are supposed to be self-regulated learners since most learning activities were accomplished with less regularly monitoring from lecturers or tutors. A blended course delivery model is widely used in universities (Zhu et al., 2016). This development implies that students should use self-regulatory strategies effectively to help themselves learn better. Therefore, self-control and self-regulatory learning skills are essential for students' success in such a learning environment. The students with a low level of self-control or self-regulatory learning skills may have more difficulty completing online or blended courses. Teachers must identify such at-risk students before the beginning of a system. Therefore, teachers can either provide more support for these students or direct them to choose courses with more face-to-face instructional sessions. Despite the popularity of blended study, it remains unclear whether these environments are successful, and if they are, which attributes make them successful (Van Laer & Elen, 2017). An important observation made by Van Laer and Elen (2017) is that blended learning seems to be especially challenging for learners with lower self-regulatory abilities. Still, the opposite is true: those who can regulate their learning do well in these environments. According to a growing body of research, blended learning environments have varying effects on learning for different kinds of learners. Those with poorer self-regulatory skills may find it challenging to keep up with the demands of blended learning because of its strain on their capacity to self-regulate. However, the inverse is also true: learners who thrive in situations characterized by high levels of learner conflict would benefit most from blended learning settings. 4 According to Ariel et al. (2018), An emphasis on mnemonic advantages rather than a less successful method (restudying) was made in repeated directions to students, stating that they should remember a translation accurately three times throughout the learning process. Compared to a control group that received no training, this minor intervention produced more successful self-regulated retrieval practice and more excellent retention of the translations. Students who received this intervention also exhibited signs of long-term learning changes: When they learned new content a week later, they employed the same kind of retrieval practice (Van Laer & Elen, 2017). A good combination of a blended environment and repeated retrieval practices will likely improve students’ performance. To design blended learning environments that support self-regulation and thus make learning more effective, we first need to determine the attributes of such environments. A series of methods can be applied to improve students' self-control, and self-regulated learning skills, such as classroom management, training on self-regulation and self-monitoring, selfregulated learning prompts, personalized learning, and self-reflecting and self-evaluating skills. It is important for university educators to further explore how to improve students' skills of using self-regulated learning strategies and support students to become self-regulated learners, not only at the stage of university study but also for a long-term goal of life-long learning. References 5 Ariel, R., & Karpicke, J. D. (2018). Improving self-regulated learning with a retrieval practice intervention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 24(1), 43. Van Laer, S., & Elen, J. (2017). In Search of Attributes That Support Self-Regulation in Blended Learning Environments. Education and Information Technologies, 22(4), 1395-1454. Zhu, Y., Au, W., & Yates, G. (2016). University Students' Self-Control and Self-Regulated Learning in A Blended Course. The Internet and Higher Education, 30, 54-62. Name: Description: ...
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