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Types of Plagiarism
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Institution
Course
Date
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Types of Plagiarism
Plagiarism refers to the act of presenting other people's work, ideas, expressions, or
theories as one's own original work. In educational contexts, the definitions of plagiarism vary.
Some scholars define plagiarism as any act of academic dishonesty, while others believe that it is
the use of other people's ideas as own ideas without their consent or acknowledgment (Blum,
2011). Students are expected to acknowledge all the information and ideas borrowed from other
sources in colleges to avoid plagiarism. Plagiarism can be intentional or unintentional.
Intentional plagiarism could lead to legal prosecutions in some countries. Similarly,
unintentional plagiarism in academia has far-reaching consequences. Therefore scholars and
students are encouraged to avoid plagiarism at all costs. Plagiarism is eliminated by
acknowledging other people's ideas whenever they are used.
There are three major types of plagiarism: word-for-word plagiarism, paraphrasing
plagiarism, and mosaic plagiarism. Word-for-word plagiarism occurs when one directly copies a
text from another source without proper quotation marks. In short, the words in the text are
copied in the same sequence they appear in the original source. Paraphrasing plagiarism is not
easily detected because it involves substituting the original text with own words. However, it is
an act of dishonesty because other people's ideas are copied without their consent or
acknowledgment. On the other hand, mosaic plagiarism is the most complicated type because
terms and phrases are lifted from the original source and copied sparingly in one's own work
(Blum, 2011). It might be hard to detect mosaic plagiarism because only a few words and
phrases are copied from the original text without the author's consent or acknowledgment.
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Reference
Blum, S. D. (2011). My Word!: Plagiarism and college culture. Cornell University Press.

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1 Types of Plagiarism Students Name Institution Course Date 2 Types of Plagiarism Plagiarism refers to the act of presenting other people's work, ideas, expressions, or theories as one's own original work. In educational contexts, the definitions of plagiarism vary. Some scholars define plagiarism as any act of academic dishonesty, while others believe that it is the use of other people's ideas as own ideas without their consent or acknowledgment (Blum, 2011). Students are expected to acknowledge all the information and ideas borrowed from other sources in colleges to avoid plagiarism. Plagiarism can be intentional or unintentional. Intentional plagiarism could lead to legal prosecutions in some countries. Similarly, unintentional plagiarism in academia has far-reaching consequences. Therefore scholars and students are encouraged to avoid plagiarism at all costs. Plagiarism is eliminated by acknowledging other people's ideas whenever they are used. There are three major types of plagiarism: word-for-word plagiarism, paraphrasing plagiarism, and mosaic plagiarism. Word-for-word plagiarism occurs when one directly copies a text from another source without proper quotation marks. In short, the words in the text are copied in the same sequence they appear in the original source. Paraphrasing plagiarism is not easily detected because it involves substituting the original text with own words. However, it is an act of dishonesty because other people's ideas are copied without their consent or acknowledgment. On the other hand, mosaic plagiarism is the most complicated type because terms and phrases are lifted from the original source and copied sparingly in one's own work (Blum, 2011). It might be hard to detect mosaic plagiarism because only a few words and phrases are copied from the original text without the author's consent or acknowledgment. 3 Reference Blum, S. D. (2011). My Word!: Plagiarism and college culture. Cornell University Press. Name: Description: ...
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