Showing Page:
1/3
New Thoughts on Controls of Natural Sea Level Dynamics and History
Mountain building, or orogeny, is derived from various geological processes, but mainly
the movement of tectonic plates. Mountain ranges generally take over millions of years to form
through the collision of tectonic plates or as one tectonic plate overrides another. Particularly in
rapidly growing mountains, tectonic plate uplift and erosion continuously bring fresh rock
material to the Earth’s surface through the weathering process. In turn, it is exposed to
circulating acidic water, which dissolves or alters the rock. This weathering produces different
effects on the Earth’s climate depending on the rock’s type. For instance, if silicate minerals
come into contact with the soil’s carbonic acid, limestone precipitates, causing carbon to be
bound for a while. Conversely, if a sulfurous mineral, such as pyrite, combines with limestone,
the sulfuric acid produced by pyrite coming in contact with water and oxygen dissolves
carbonate minerals, producing carbon dioxide. Consequently, this connection between mountain
building and chemical weathering is projected to affect the Earth’s climate for millions of years.
Taiwan best exemplifies this weathering process as it is located at a subduction zone,
where an oceanic plate slides under Asia, causing rapid mountain growth and repeated extreme
events such as severe earthquakes and typhoons. Erosion processes occur up to a thousand times
faster in the center of the island than in Southern Taiwan, where the mountains have low relief
and erode slower. GFZ researchers recently conducted a study where they sampled rivers that
collect water from Taiwan’s mountains at different erosion rates. The researchers estimated the
proportion of carbonate, sulfide, and silicate minerals in the weathering through the material
dissolved in the rivers, the amount of carbon dioxide concealed, and the amount of carbon
dioxide released by the weathering process. As Taiwan’s southern tip just emerged from the sea,
researchers found that atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestration dominated in the southernmost
part. As mountains erode more quickly in Northern Taiwan, researchers found that carbon
Showing Page:
2/3
dioxide is released, and carbonate and sulfide weathering rates are more significant. The study
conducted by GMZ researchers supports the claims made in “Tropical Uplift May Set Earth’s
Thermostat,” as mountain building not only brings sedimentary rocks with pyrite and carbonate
to Earth’s surface but also brings rock types that have formed from solidified magma and contain
fresh silicates that weather quickly.
The severity of climate change impacts can possibly be managed by reducing the amount
of carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere. Implementing strategies such as biogeochemical
improvement of soils through the addition of crushing reactive silicate rocks to crops could
potentially improve crop production, protect from pests and diseases, and restore soil fertility and
structure. Out of all strategies proposed, this approach seems to be the most feasible in removing
carbon dioxide. According to the article, “Spreading Rock Dust on Fields Could Remove Vast
Amounts of CO
2
from Air,” this strategy could remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from
the air each year. This strategy could be implemented on a global scale as worldwide, managed
croplands are already equipped for rock dust additions to soil. This strategy has the potential to
be rapidly adopted worldwide, and its benefits could produce adequate financial incentives for
widespread adoption. However, several challenges need to be addressed and overcome, such as
audited field-scale assessments of the efficacy of carbon dioxide capture and environmental
monitoring. In addition to this, a cost-effective approach to fulfilling the rock requirements for
carbon dioxide removal needs to be developed, but this could be achieved by recycling silicate
waste materials. Lastly, the public may not be open-minded to implementing this strategy, so it
may take some time to deem it trustworthy.
Showing Page:
3/3
Works Cited
Carrington, Damian. “Spreading Rock Dust on Fields Could Remove Vast Amounts of CO
2
from Air.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 8 July 2020.
GMZ, and Helmholtz Centre. “Mountain Growth Influences Greenhouse Effect.” ScienceDaily,
ScienceDaily, 8 Apr. 2021.
Selvaraj, Kandasamy, and Chen‐Tung Arthur Chen. “Moderate Chemical Weathering of
Subtropical Taiwan: Constraints from Solid‐Phase Geochemistry of Sediments and
Sedimentary Rocks.” The Journal of Geology, vol. 114, no. 1, 2006, pp. 101116.,
doi:10.1086/498102.
Voosen, Paul. “Mountain Growth Influences Greenhouse Effect.” ScienceDaily, ScienceDaily, 8
Apr. 2021.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

New Thoughts on Controls of Natural Sea Level Dynamics and History Mountain building, or orogeny, is derived from various geological processes, but mainly the movement of tectonic plates. Mountain ranges generally take over millions of years to form through the collision of tectonic plates or as one tectonic plate overrides another. Particularly in rapidly growing mountains, tectonic plate uplift and erosion continuously bring fresh rock material to the Earth’s surface through the weathering process. In turn, it is exposed to circulating acidic water, which dissolves or alters the rock. This weathering produces different effects on the Earth’s climate depending on the rock’s type. For instance, if silicate minerals come into contact with the soil’s carbonic acid, limestone precipitates, causing carbon to be bound for a while. Conversely, if a sulfurous mineral, such as pyrite, combines with limestone, the sulfuric acid produced by pyrite coming in contact with water and oxygen dissolves carbonate minerals, producing carbon dioxide. Consequently, this connection between mountain building and chemical weathering is projected to affect the Earth’s climate for millions of years. Taiwan best exemplifies this weathering process as it is located at a subduction zone, where an oceanic plate slides under Asia, causing rapid mountain growth and repeated extreme events such as severe earthquakes and typhoons. Erosion processes occur up to a thousand times faster in the center of the island than in Southern Taiwan, where the mountains have low relief and erode slower. GFZ researchers recently conducted a study where they sampled rivers that collect water from Taiwan’s mountains at different erosion rates. The researchers estimated the proportion of carbonate, sulfide, and silicate minerals in the weathering through the material dissolved in the rivers, the amount of carbon dioxide concealed, and the amount of carbon dioxide released by the weathering process. As Taiwan’s southern tip just emerged from the sea, researchers found that atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestration dominated in the southernmost part. As mountains erode more quickly in Northern Taiwan, researchers found that carbon dioxide is released, and carbonate and sulfide weathering rates are more significant. The study conducted by GMZ researchers supports the claims made in “Tropical Uplift May Set Earth’s Thermostat,” as mountain building not only brings sedimentary rocks with pyrite and carbonate to Earth’s surface but also brings rock types that have formed from solidified magma and contain fresh silicates that weather quickly. The severity of climate change impacts can possibly be managed by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere. Implementing strategies such as biogeochemical improvement of soils through the addition of crushing reactive silicate rocks to crops could potentially improve crop production, protect from pests and diseases, and restore soil fertility and structure. Out of all strategies proposed, this approach seems to be the most feasible in removing carbon dioxide. According to the article, “Spreading Rock Dust on Fields Could Remove Vast Amounts of CO from Air,” this strategy could remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from 2 the air each year. This strategy could be implemented on a global scale as worldwide, managed croplands are already equipped for rock dust additions to soil. This strategy has the potential to be rapidly adopted worldwide, and its benefits could produce adequate financial incentives for widespread adoption. However, several challenges need to be addressed and overcome, such as audited field-scale assessments of the efficacy of carbon dioxide capture and environmental monitoring. In addition to this, a cost-effective approach to fulfilling the rock requirements for carbon dioxide removal needs to be developed, but this could be achieved by recycling silicate waste materials. Lastly, the public may not be open-minded to implementing this strategy, so it may take some time to deem it trustworthy. Works Cited Carrington, Damian. “Spreading Rock Dust on Fields Could Remove Vast Amounts of CO 2 from Air.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 8 July 2020. GMZ, and Helmholtz Centre. “Mountain Growth Influences Greenhouse Effect.” ScienceDaily, ScienceDaily, 8 Apr. 2021. Selvaraj, Kandasamy, and Chen‐Tung Arthur Chen. “Moderate Chemical Weathering of Subtropical Taiwan: Constraints from Solid‐Phase Geochemistry of Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks.” The Journal of Geology, vol. 114, no. 1, 2006, pp. 101–116., doi:10.1086/498102. Voosen, Paul. “Mountain Growth Influences Greenhouse Effect.” ScienceDaily, ScienceDaily, 8 Apr. 2021. Name: Description: ...
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.
Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4