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Sir Isaac Newton, an English physicist and mathematician was born on December 25, 1642. He
died on March 20, 1727. Newton was not expected to live after his birth, for he was born
prematurely. His father, Isaac Newton, died before he was born. Shortly after his mother remarried
another man by the name of Barnabas Smith. Isaac Newton was left with his grandmother, while
his mother went to go live with her new husband. In the mist of all that happened in his early
childhood, Newton began to think of violent tendencies against his mother and step father. When
Newton turned 12 years old, his mother decided to take him under her care only because her second
husband died. Newton soon found out that his mother has three other children. Newton went to a
school named King’s school. This is where he began to learn about chemistry. His mother did not
allow him to attend school, instead she pulled him out so that he can work as a farmer. Newton
disliked this very much as a child. Eventually he was put back in King’s school to finish his
education. After he finished his basic education he eventually went to college, and that is where
he began to bloom into the scientist that he is known for.
Newton attended University of Cambridge’s Trinity College. When he got to the university he
was introduced to the Scientific Revolution. The Scientific Revolution consists of the heliocentric
view and the geocentric view. The astronomers that were responsible for these theories were
Nicolaus Copernicus, Galileo, and Johannes Kepler. Newton might have been in the mist of the
Scientific Revolution, but he was not taught about the theories of the Scientific Revolution. He
was taught basic science, and Newton was more interested in the advanced science. On his free
time, he would write notes based upon the Scientific Revolution. When Newton graduated, he was
offered financial help to continue his education. Unfortunately, Newton could not continue with
his education. Instead he had to return home, for the Great Plague moved its way to Cambridge.
The plague did not stop Newton from studying. He studied at home for quite some time, then
returned to Cambridge when the plague left. Newton was very good at math, and he didn’t receive
any recognition for his work ethnics. Newton didn’t start to get recognition for his work until Isaac
Barrow, a friend of Newton, introduced his mathematical theories to John Collins. John Collins
was a British mathematician who was interested in furthering Newton’s career. Newton’s life soon
began to go through a drastic change.
Newton went from being a student to a professor with the help of John Collins. In 1668 Newton
constructed his own telescope to help him prove his theory of light and color. Newton was forced
to prove his theory of light and color to the Royal Society. The Royal Society insisted that Newton
publish his notes on his theory of light and color, but some of them criticized his work. The first
person to criticized his work was Robert Hooke. Hooke challenged Newton’s theory of what light
was made of. Newton argued light was made up of particles, and Hooke argued that light was
made up of wavelengths. Hooke’s criticizing didn’t affect Newton too much. On the other hand,
the other members of the Royal society strongly criticized Newton’s theories. This caused him to
want to give up on the society all together. The disagreement between Newton and the other
members lasted for a few years. Newton began to feel depressed about the whole situation. When
his mother died in 1678, his depression increased. He isolated himself from society, but he
continued his work on gravitation and how it affects the orbit of the planets. Newton eventually
published a book called Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. The book better known
as Principia.
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The Principia consists of Newton’s three basic laws of motion. These laws are still used in
today’s science classes. Newton’s first law states that an object can remain in the same spot unless
a force changes its motion. For example, an apple is placed in the middle of the table. The apple
is found on the floor. The only way the apple would roll off the table is if it was forced to move.
Therefore, someone had to push the apple off the table because the apple cannot move on by itself.
His second law states that acceleration and mass are equal. Acceleration is made when as
unbalanced force acts on an object. For example, an empty bag is easier to lift than a bag filled
with groceries because the bag full of groceries would have more mass than the empty bag.
Newton’s third law states that for every action there is an opposite reaction. When air is released
from a balloon, the balloon flies into the air causing it to be the opposite reaction. Newton’s
discoveries brought him far in life. His accomplishments were recognized more, and he started to
work with the public more often. During this time Hooke became more of a problem to Newton.
Hooke accused Newton of stealing his ideas, so Newton cut all ties with Hooke. Newton wanted
nothing to do with Hooke because of his behavior. Not long after the commotion between Newton
and Hooke, Newton’s career escalated into bigger and better opportunities. His success led him to
being the president of the Royal Society. He also was chosen to be the warden of the Mint. Newton
became an important individual during this time.
As Newton grew older he decided to live with his niece in Cranbury Park. Many people
respected Newton as a scientist. He didn’t have any problems with anyone. He no longer had any
rivalry between his former members of the Royal society. Newton accumulated wealth as he
worked over the years. He wasn’t stingy with his money either. Instead he gave money to charities.
Newton was so busy with his life that he didn’t marry anyone or have any children. Newton
focused heavily on his theories of light and gravitational force. He worked hard all his life, and
didn’t leave room for a social life. He wasn’t antisocial, but he didn’t have many friends either.
When he was living with his niece in Cranbury Park he developed a sickness that he couldn’t
overcome. He later died at the age of 84. Even after his death he still was famous. Newton was
influenced by scientists Rene Descartes, Johannes Kepler, Nicolaus Copernicus, and many more.
Other scientists also admired Newton as well. For example, Plato and Galileo admired Newton’s
work.
Newton was always a curious individual as a young boy. His interest in science grew as he
learned more and more of the scientific revolution. He grew up in an unstable environment. His
father wasn’t in his life due to an early death. His mother left him to live with another man, and
Newton was left with his grandmother. His life as a child was difficult. He started school, but
couldn’t finish on time due to family issues. Through all his trouble as a child Newton’s outlet was
learning about science and math. He enjoyed the more advanced science and wanted to learn more
about it. His journey in college led him to his discoveries of light and color. He also began to make
theories about gravitational force. Newton had his ups and downs with his discoveries, and it was
never easy sharing his ideas with others. Not everyone was pleased to hear what he had come up
with, and some even disagreed with his theories. This knocked his confidence down a bit, but it
didn’t stop him from pursuing his passion. Eventually Newton became one of the best scientists in
Europe. Newton’s death didn’t stop the world from using his theories. They are still taught and
used in today’s schools. Newton is the leading scientist of western Europe.
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Sir Isaac Newton, an English physicist and mathematician was born on December 25, 1642. He died on March 20, 1727. Newton was not expected to live after his birth, for he was born prematurely. His father, Isaac Newton, died before he was born. Shortly after his mother remarried another man by the name of Barnabas Smith. Isaac Newton was left with his grandmother, while his mother went to go live with her new husband. In the mist of all that happened in his early childhood, Newton began to think of violent tendencies against his mother and step father. When Newton turned 12 years old, his mother decided to take him under her care only because her second husband died. Newton soon found out that his mother has three other children. Newton went to a school named King’s school. This is where he began to learn about chemistry. His mother did not allow him to attend school, instead she pulled him out so that he can work as a farmer. Newton disliked this very much as a child. Eventually he was put back in King’s school to finish his education. After he finished his basic education he eventually went to college, and that is where he began to bloom into the scientist that he is known for. Newton attended University of Cambridge’s Trinity College. When he got to the university he was introduced to the Scientific Revolution. The Scientific Revolution consists of the heliocentric view and the geocentric view. The astronomers that were responsible for these theories were Nicolaus Copernicus, Galileo, and Johannes Kepler. Newton might have been in the mist of the Scientific Revolution, but he was not taught about the theories of the Scientific Revolution. He was taught basic science, and Newton was more interested in the advanced science. On his free time, he would write notes based upon the Scientific Revolution. When Newton graduated, he was offered financial help to continue his education. Unfortunately, Newton could not continue with his education. Instead he had to return home, for the Great Plague moved its way to Cambridge. The plague did not stop Newton from studying. He studied at home for quite some time, then returned to Cambridge when the plague left. Newton was very good at math, and he didn’t receive any recognition for his work ethnics. Newton didn’t start to get recognition for his work until Isaac Barrow, a friend of Newton, introduced his mathematical theories to John Collins. John Collins was a British mathematician who was interested in furthering Newton’s career. Newton’s life soon began to go through a drastic change. Newton went from being a student to a professor with the help of John Collins. In 1668 Newton constructed his own telescope to help him prove his theory of light and color. Newton was forced to prove his theory of light and color to the Royal Society. The Royal Society insisted that Newton publish his notes on his theory of light and color, but some of them criticized his work. The first person to criticized his work was Robert Hooke. Hooke challenged Newton’s theory of what light was made of. Newton argued light was made up of particles, and Hooke argued that light was made up of wavelengths. Hooke’s criticizing didn’t affect Newton too much. On the other hand, the other members of the Royal society strongly criticized Newton’s theories. This caused him to want to give up on the society all together. The disagreement between Newton and the other members lasted for a few years. Newton began to feel depressed about the whole situation. When his mother died in 1678, his depression increased. He isolated himself from society, but he continued his work on gravitation and how it affects the orbit of the planets. Newton eventually published a book called Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. The book better known as Principia. The Principia consists of Newton’s three basic laws of motion. These laws are still used in today’s science classes. Newton’s first law states that an object can remain in the same spot unless a force changes its motion. For example, an apple is placed in the middle of the table. The apple is found on the floor. The only way the apple would roll off the table is if it was forced to move. Therefore, someone had to push the apple off the table because the apple cannot move on by itself. His second law states that acceleration and mass are equal. Acceleration is made when as unbalanced force acts on an object. For example, an empty bag is easier to lift than a bag filled with groceries because the bag full of groceries would have more mass than the empty bag. Newton’s third law states that for every action there is an opposite reaction. When air is released from a balloon, the balloon flies into the air causing it to be the opposite reaction. Newton’s discoveries brought him far in life. His accomplishments were recognized more, and he started to work with the public more often. During this time Hooke became more of a problem to Newton. Hooke accused Newton of stealing his ideas, so Newton cut all ties with Hooke. Newton wanted nothing to do with Hooke because of his behavior. Not long after the commotion between Newton and Hooke, Newton’s career escalated into bigger and better opportunities. His success led him to being the president of the Royal Society. He also was chosen to be the warden of the Mint. Newton became an important individual during this time. As Newton grew older he decided to live with his niece in Cranbury Park. Many people respected Newton as a scientist. He didn’t have any problems with anyone. He no longer had any rivalry between his former members of the Royal society. Newton accumulated wealth as he worked over the years. He wasn’t stingy with his money either. Instead he gave money to charities. Newton was so busy with his life that he didn’t marry anyone or have any children. Newton focused heavily on his theories of light and gravitational force. He worked hard all his life, and didn’t leave room for a social life. He wasn’t antisocial, but he didn’t have many friends either. When he was living with his niece in Cranbury Park he developed a sickness that he couldn’t overcome. He later died at the age of 84. Even after his death he still was famous. Newton was influenced by scientists Rene Descartes, Johannes Kepler, Nicolaus Copernicus, and many more. Other scientists also admired Newton as well. For example, Plato and Galileo admired Newton’s work. Newton was always a curious individual as a young boy. His interest in science grew as he learned more and more of the scientific revolution. He grew up in an unstable environment. His father wasn’t in his life due to an early death. His mother left him to live with another man, and Newton was left with his grandmother. His life as a child was difficult. He started school, but couldn’t finish on time due to family issues. Through all his trouble as a child Newton’s outlet was learning about science and math. He enjoyed the more advanced science and wanted to learn more about it. His journey in college led him to his discoveries of light and color. He also began to make theories about gravitational force. Newton had his ups and downs with his discoveries, and it was never easy sharing his ideas with others. Not everyone was pleased to hear what he had come up with, and some even disagreed with his theories. This knocked his confidence down a bit, but it didn’t stop him from pursuing his passion. Eventually Newton became one of the best scientists in Europe. Newton’s death didn’t stop the world from using his theories. They are still taught and used in today’s schools. Newton is the leading scientist of western Europe. Name: Description: ...
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