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GC 204: PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING Obiena, Karl Matthew J.
JOURNAL ARTICLE CRITIQUE 1
: Retuya et. al (2017)
The Priming Effect of Family’s Obligation on Filipino Students’ Academic Performance
Journal Article Critique #1
The Priming Effect of Family’s Obligation on Filipino Students’ Academic Performance
by Claudiane O. Retuya, Desiree Mae S. Ceniza, Jhamelyn M. Lara, Sheena Grace A.
Tare & Khael T. Quinain
Philippine Journal of Psychology, 2017, 50 (2), 159-173
Claudia O. Retuya et. al (2017) presented a study about the family obligation as a
motivational factor on Filipino students’ academic performance. The researchers attempted
to come out whether family obligation would outweigh mastery goal and performance goal
in influencing academic performance. In addition, mastery goal focuses on the mastering
of skills while performance goal focuses on outperforming others. Data gathering was done
using the several questionnaires created by the researchers to 163 undergraduate students
(63 males and 100 females) currently taking a General Psychology course at the University
of San Carlos. The respondents were divided into four components: 43 participants for
mastery goal, 37 for performance goal, 44 for family obligation and 39 for the control
group. Further, the participants were primed using two different sets of materials, first of
which was done through sentence completion and second was through jumbled words.
Since this study is linked with one’s academic abilities, the grade point average (GPA) was
retrieved from the University Registrar. But the GPA does not have an effect on the
academic performance scores of the participants. Getting down to the analysis of
Covariance summary results, it shows that among the factors, participants under family
obligation (M=7.97) had the highest academic performance score, followed by the control
group (M=7.18) and performance goal (M=7.01), and the lowest scores were on mastery
goal (M=6.39). The result data show that family obligation plays the most working
motivational factor. In Filipino educational contexts, students who are motivated by their
family can do harder for their studies so that, after reaching success, they will be able to
pay off their parents’ sacrifices for them. However, mastery goal and performance goal
lead the students to getting a lower chance of performing well in school. Students will not
make it to perform well because students will likely to compare themselves and be busy
looking for what they should do to reach success, unlike to family obligation, which
becomes above and better than these two factors.
It has been common among Filipinos that the drive that motivates to do better in
school derives from our family. I appreciate the authors for initiating a study on this,
especially that the factorsmastery goal, performance goal and family obligationwere
put to be studied and given importance as to the degree of what motivates the students
most. And in the end, family obligation becomes the factor that pushes students to perform
well in their academic. Retuya et. al (2017) emphasizes on the motivation to learn which
is driven by parental expectation. Families play a significant role in Filipino students’
Showing Page:
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GC 204: PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING Obiena, Karl Matthew J.
academic performance. Blair (2014) included in his research that the nature of parental
involvement affects the child’s academic performance. Therefore, even if family obligation
would somehow push a greater chance in the academic performance of the students, it
would still depend on how much a family means to them. Moreover, it tells that what
pushes the Filipinos to get a better performance in school can be traced to parent-related
factors. According to Blair (2014), Filipino parents are shown to be more active in their
children’s school activities, i.e., volunteering at their children’s schools. Because of this
truth, students, in return, do to improve their studies and get higher grades for their parents,
who are active in the school and show a spared time to get in touch with their children’s
teachers.
The other motivational factors such as mastery goal and performance goal have
impacted the students on their academic performance, but not much. I would like to cite
that the implication of these two factors are not strong in the academic performance of the
students is that they are less founded than the family obligation due to the fact of the close
family ties. The Article 149 of the Family Code of the Philippines (2010) stated that the
family is a basic social institution. By this article, it implies that the attachment built by the
students to their parents would cause a mental construct that the students have to pay back
what their parents have sacrificed for them, thus a family obligation. This is why a student
who outperforms other students does not persevere until the desired time because the
foundation is not strong, or a student who does everything to learn new skills and how to
learn will not be able to withstand longer because, unlike family-related factors, it is
founded strongly.
According to the authors of this article, Retuya et. al (2017) found out that from
their respondentsanswers, the highest scores fall under family obligation. This is to speak
that as Filipinos, we have very close-knit family ties.
Showing Page:
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GC 204: PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING Obiena, Karl Matthew J.
References:
Retuya, C. et al (2017). The Priming Effect of Family’s Obligation on Filipino Students’
Academic Performance. Philippine Journal of Psychology, 2017, 50 (2), 159-173
Blair, SL (2014). Journal on Comparative Family Studies. Vol. 1 45, No. 3, pp. 351-366
published by University of Toronto Press
https://www.jstor.org/stable/24339542
The 1987 Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines, Article 149 of the Family Code
of the Philippines (2010)

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Obiena, Karl Matthew J. Journal Article Critique #1 The Priming Effect of Family’s Obligation on Filipino Students’ Academic Performance by Claudiane O. Retuya, Desiree Mae S. Ceniza, Jhamelyn M. Lara, Sheena Grace A. Tare & Khael T. Quinain Philippine Journal of Psychology, 2017, 50 (2), 159-173 Claudia O. Retuya et. al (2017) presented a study about the family obligation as a motivational factor on Filipino students’ academic performance. The researchers attempted to come out whether family obligation would outweigh mastery goal and performance goal in influencing academic performance. In addition, mastery goal focuses on the mastering of skills while performance goal focuses on outperforming others. Data gathering was done using the several questionnaires created by the researchers to 163 undergraduate students (63 males and 100 females) currently taking a General Psychology course at the University of San Carlos. The respondents were divided into four components: 43 participants for mastery goal, 37 for performance goal, 44 for family obligation and 39 for the control group. Further, the participants were primed using two different sets of materials, first of which was done through sentence completion and second was through jumbled words. Since this study is linked with one’s academic abilities, the grade point average (GPA) was retrieved from the University Registrar. But the GPA does not have an effect on the academic performance scores of the participants. Getting down to the analysis of Covariance summary results, it shows that among the factors, participants under family obligation (M=7.97) had the highest academic performance score, followed by the control group (M=7.18) and performance goal (M=7.01), and the lowest scores were on mastery goal (M=6.39). The result data show that family obligation plays the most working motivational factor. In Filipino educational contexts, students who are motivated by their family can do harder for their studies so that, after reaching success, they will be able to pay off their parents’ sacrifices for them. However, mastery goal and performance goal lead the students to getting a lower chance of performing well in school. Students will not make it to perform well because students will likely to compare themselves and be busy looking for what they should do to reach success, unlike to family obligation, which becomes above and better than these two factors. It has been common among Filipinos that the drive that motivates to do better in school derives from our family. I appreciate the authors for initiating a study on this, especially that the factors—mastery goal, performance goal and family obligation—were put to be studied and given importance as to the degree of what motivates the students most. And in the end, family obligation becomes the factor that pushes students to perform well in their academic. Retuya et. al (2017) emphasizes on the motivation to learn which is driven by parental expectation. Families play a significant role in Filipino students’ JOURNAL ARTICLE CRITIQUE 1: Retuya et. al (2017) The Priming Effect of Family’s Obligation on Filipino Students’ Academic Performance GC 204: PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING GC 204: PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING Obiena, Karl Matthew J. academic performance. Blair (2014) included in his research that the nature of parental involvement affects the child’s academic performance. Therefore, even if family obligation would somehow push a greater chance in the academic performance of the students, it would still depend on how much a family means to them. Moreover, it tells that what pushes the Filipinos to get a better performance in school can be traced to parent-related factors. According to Blair (2014), Filipino parents are shown to be more active in their children’s school activities, i.e., volunteering at their children’s schools. Because of this truth, students, in return, do to improve their studies and get higher grades for their parents, who are active in the school and show a spared time to get in touch with their children’s teachers. The other motivational factors such as mastery goal and performance goal have impacted the students on their academic performance, but not much. I would like to cite that the implication of these two factors are not strong in the academic performance of the students is that they are less founded than the family obligation due to the fact of the close family ties. The Article 149 of the Family Code of the Philippines (2010) stated that the family is a basic social institution. By this article, it implies that the attachment built by the students to their parents would cause a mental construct that the students have to pay back what their parents have sacrificed for them, thus a family obligation. This is why a student who outperforms other students does not persevere until the desired time because the foundation is not strong, or a student who does everything to learn new skills and how to learn will not be able to withstand longer because, unlike family-related factors, it is founded strongly. According to the authors of this article, Retuya et. al (2017) found out that from their respondents’ answers, the highest scores fall under family obligation. This is to speak that as Filipinos, we have very close-knit family ties. GC 204: PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING Obiena, Karl Matthew J. References: Retuya, C. et al (2017). The Priming Effect of Family’s Obligation on Filipino Students’ Academic Performance. Philippine Journal of Psychology, 2017, 50 (2), 159-173 Blair, SL (2014). Journal on Comparative Family Studies. Vol. 1 45, No. 3, pp. 351-366 published by University of Toronto Press https://www.jstor.org/stable/24339542 The 1987 Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines, Article 149 of the Family Code of the Philippines (2010) Name: Description: ...
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