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INCREASED ACCES IN TELEMEDICINE
In today’s time, technology is evolving at such an expeditious pace, enabling faster change
and advancement. However, the emerging society has faced numerous problems that impede the
flow of progress. As the COVID-19 virus wreaks havoc with the healthcare system, professionals
transpire with a progressing digitalization in the industry.
Digitalization in the healthcare industry is becoming the new norm. It provides more
affordable, efficient care options and extends providers the opportunity to better serve a larger
number of patients in a shorter period of time. Virtual care practically eliminates waiting periods,
ensures appointments are fulfilled on time, and improves a patient’s quality of life. The
Department of Health (DOH) and the National Privacy Commission (NPC) has developed a
framework for telemedicine services in a bid to improve access to health services during the
Enhanced Community Quarantine. Under the DOH-NPC Joint Memorandum Circular medical
consultations over the phone, chat, short messaging service (SMS), and other audio and visual-
conferencing platforms are considered telemedicine services in the country, these includes google
meet, messenger video calls and zoom meetings. Healthcare providers conducting these
consultations are allowed to issue electronic case reports and prescriptions.
In an effort to limit the spread of COVID-19, the WHO (World Health Organization) is
now compensating for most virtual visits, insurers are waiving virtual visit copayments, and
physician organizations are urging their doctors to transition to telemedicine. Telemedicine has
undergone many transformations since then, but the end goal has always remained the same.
Telehealth increases convenience for both the doctor and patient and decreases everyone’s risk of
exposure to COVID-19. It does not only reduce the causeless spread of disease, but it allows
physicians and nurses to better care for their patients. It bridges the gap between people, physicians
and health systems, enabling everyone, especially symptomatic patients, to stay at home and
communicate with physicians through virtual channels, helping to reduce the spread of the virus
to mass populations and the medical staff on the frontlines. In addition, the CDC (Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention) is urging the public and medical staff to use telehealth solutions
for non-urgent communication in an effort to reduce the pressures facing emergency rooms and
clinics
Yet, while telehealth has undeniable strong points, there are still vulnerabilities in its
adoption. The most obvious of which are that it does not allow for physical exams or lab tests.
Less obvious though, is the potential of telehealth to exacerbate health disparities. Another greatest
danger is the ongoing battle to ensure the secure transfer and storage of patient medical records
and personal data. Digitally storing patient data is great for accessibility and convenience, but there
is always a chance for hackers to gain access to this information. Healthcare leaders cannot be
reactive to these risks; however, proactivity will help prevent hackers from finding their way into
patient information and stave off fraud and deceit attempts.
As the healthcare industry continues to rely on telemedicine, and as these virtual platforms
continue to expand, it is unarguable that technology and digitalization becomes now our human
necessity. It may have its varying limitations, it can still be outweighed by the fact, observed and
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practiced in medical industry and healthcare system, that technology saved us from further
destruction in this COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, this only goes to show that there is a need to
involve ourselves to innovations of technology, in the hopes to save more human lives, in a quick
and efficient way.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

INCREASED ACCES IN TELEMEDICINE In today’s time, technology is evolving at such an expeditious pace, enabling faster change and advancement. However, the emerging society has faced numerous problems that impede the flow of progress. As the COVID-19 virus wreaks havoc with the healthcare system, professionals transpire with a progressing digitalization in the industry. Digitalization in the healthcare industry is becoming the new norm. It provides more affordable, efficient care options and extends providers the opportunity to better serve a larger number of patients in a shorter period of time. Virtual care practically eliminates waiting periods, ensures appointments are fulfilled on time, and improves a patient’s quality of life. The Department of Health (DOH) and the National Privacy Commission (NPC) has developed a framework for telemedicine services in a bid to improve access to health services during the Enhanced Community Quarantine. Under the DOH-NPC Joint Memorandum Circular medical consultations over the phone, chat, short messaging service (SMS), and other audio and visualconferencing platforms are considered telemedicine services in the country, these includes google meet, messenger video calls and zoom meetings. Healthcare providers conducting these consultations are allowed to issue electronic case reports and prescriptions. In an effort to limit the spread of COVID-19, the WHO (World Health Organization) is now compensating for most virtual visits, insurers are waiving virtual visit copayments, and physician organizations are urging their doctors to transition to telemedicine. Telemedicine has undergone many transformations since then, but the end goal has always remained the same. Telehealth increases convenience for both the doctor and patient and decreases everyone’s risk of exposure to COVID-19. It does not only reduce the causeless spread of disease, but it allows physicians and nurses to better care for their patients. It bridges the gap between people, physicians and health systems, enabling everyone, especially symptomatic patients, to stay at home and communicate with physicians through virtual channels, helping to reduce the spread of the virus to mass populations and the medical staff on the frontlines. In addition, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is urging the public and medical staff to use telehealth solutions for non-urgent communication in an effort to reduce the pressures facing emergency rooms and clinics Yet, while telehealth has undeniable strong points, there are still vulnerabilities in its adoption. The most obvious of which are that it does not allow for physical exams or lab tests. Less obvious though, is the potential of telehealth to exacerbate health disparities. Another greatest danger is the ongoing battle to ensure the secure transfer and storage of patient medical records and personal data. Digitally storing patient data is great for accessibility and convenience, but there is always a chance for hackers to gain access to this information. Healthcare leaders cannot be reactive to these risks; however, proactivity will help prevent hackers from finding their way into patient information and stave off fraud and deceit attempts. As the healthcare industry continues to rely on telemedicine, and as these virtual platforms continue to expand, it is unarguable that technology and digitalization becomes now our human necessity. It may have its varying limitations, it can still be outweighed by the fact, observed and practiced in medical industry and healthcare system, that technology saved us from further destruction in this COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, this only goes to show that there is a need to involve ourselves to innovations of technology, in the hopes to save more human lives, in a quick and efficient way. Name: Description: ...
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