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Student’s Name
Professor’s Name
Course
Date
Comparison Essay on "The Two Fridas,"
Introduction
Frida Kahlo's oil painting, The Two Fridas (translated as "The Two Fridas"), is known as
La Dos Fridas in Spanish. Her first large-scale work, it's widely regarded as one of her finest
pieces of work. It's a double portrait of Kahlo, showing two different aspects of herself sitting
side by side. (Kahlo et al.) One is dressed in a white Victorian-style European gown, and the
other is dressed in a traditional Tehuana gown.. Kahlo separated Diego Rivera in 1939, and that
year she painted this painting (Kahlo et al.). There are some art historians who believe the two
characters in the artwork reflect Frida's two families, one Spanish and one Mexican. Her
grandmother, Matilde Calderon, was Spanish and Amerindian, while her dad, Guillermo Kahlo,
was German.
According to this theory, Diego Rivera admired the Tehuana Frida, whereas he rejected
the European Frida because she was too European. According to Frida's memories, the artwork
depicts a childhood memory of an imaginary acquaintance (Kahlo et al.). Both Fridas have
objects in their laps: the Mexican one has a little Diego Rivera portrait, while the European one
has forceps. A ruptured blood artery, severed by the forceps, leaks down the white frock of the
European Frida. The blood vessel, which runs from one Frida's hand to the other's heart, unites
the two Fridas. There are references to Frida Kahlo's painful existence as well as the Aztec
custom of human sacrifice in the artwork (Kahlo et al.). Despite being created shortly after her
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separation, Kahlo's European Frida is lacking one of her most defining characteristics, a
relationship with her own Diego.
Comparison on "The Two Fridas,"
As she has stated, her work is derived from personal truth rather than a visionary source
Thus, her paintings appear to have served as a vehicle for contemplation. She turned to painting
as an outlet for her feelings of boredom after a series of traumatic events in her life. Her initial
career goal was to become a doctor (Lindauer et al. 142). Nevertheless, a life altering unfortunate
incident, that also left woman constrained to her room for the next year, made her quit this vision
and she began painting instead. This painting was completed right after her split from Diego
Rivera, according to the artist's chronology.
Their union had only lasted a whirlwind decade. The couple had found love at the period
while he was assisting her achieve better on her paintings. Most likely, the tale of her harrowing
life served as inspiration for both the artwork and her union with Diego (Lindauer et al. 143). For
the painting's two personas to be distinguished, one must comprehend situations of their life.
Besides the disaster, she had withstood numerous miscarriages, induced abortion and more than
forty procedures on her body. When she was a child, she dreamed of being mother to a few
children. This was complicated, however, by the accident's consequences. Clearly, she had high
hopes for her marriage to Diego, but instead all she received was an unhappy marriage marred by
recurrent adultery that ended in divorce (Lindauer et al. 144). She was also politically active and
devoted to her country, frequently speaking out in favor of the rights of peasants.
There are two different representations of Frida in the painting. Possibly from her
marriage to Diego, the first Frida is wearing a white gown (Lindauer et al. 144). The other Frida,
dressed in a blue costume typical of Spanish villagers among someone she had always identified,
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sits across from her. Both Fridas' hearts are exposed, and an artery runs between them. A set of
medical clippers are clutched in the hands of the first Frida's bloodied hands as her clothing is
ripped to shreds. (Lindauer et al. 145)Unlike the other Frida, whom appears happy and relaxed,
this one appears dejected and drained. Even though the second Frida's heart is also on display, it
is whole. The two Fridas are clutching a small portrait of Diego that the first Frida is holding in
her other hand.
The picture can be used to make a number of interesting comparisons, but the most of
them will be with respect to differences. Both Fridas in the artwork are the real Frida Kahlo,
although they have different personas (Lindauer et al. 145). That's about it. The first Frida shows
the pain of the artist. Her crushed heart serves as a reminder of her shattered hopes for a happy
marriage with her beloved husband. The long, traditional white dress she's wearing is meant to
conceal her physical insecurities (Lindauer et al. 145). She is still clinging to her passions like
her profession and her family since the surgical scissors stop the blood from leaking out of the
artery. It could also be a reflection of her ambition to become a parent, which was dashed in the
disaster.
It's easy to see how much anguish she's been through by looking at the blood spots on her
white clothing. This Frida is frightened and restricted by the harsh facts of her existence, which
are largely comprised of traumatic events. She lacks self-assurance due to the limitations
imposed on her by societal and cultural conventions. The philosophies of the artist, on the other
hand, can be used to create a comparison. Frida wears an outfit from the previous century, which
was fashionable in the West at the time (Lindauer et al. 144). Diego, in contrast to Frida, was
receptive to western beliefs. She pictured herself living like the Mexican peasants who ruled the
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country at the time. Frida yearned for the typical life of a wife in a patriarchal culture after
Mexico's revolution.
As a result of his desire to conform to Western social conventions and demonstrate his
power, Diego committed adultery in order to have children with his mistress (Tucker and Zsofia
p.30). Because of her inability to fit in, she was abandoned and left with a broken heart after
being rejected by her spouse. This contributed to her overall misery. The medical blades would
be used to sever her ties with Diego, who exhibits a complete lack of empathy for her
predicament. It's the artery and touching that bind Frida's two figures together. Both characters
represent the same individual, and while they are distinct, they represent a certain period in the
life of the artist (Tucker and Zsofia p.30). The second Frida, on the other hand, exudes self-
assurance and even appears to be content.
Frida is clearly the Frida she always envisioned herself to be, unafraid of the difficulties
life can throw her way. The cord that holds Diego's image in her palm represents the umbilical
cord (Tucker and Zsofia p.30). This demonstrates that she viewed Diego as more than just her
husband; she viewed him as a child who needed her care. This Frida, on the other hand, is
looking to redeem herself after a life of misery. Her heart's completeness denotes someone who
has recovered and is no longer burdened by the wounds inflicted on the first. It also harkens back
to a happier time when she was still in love with Diego, which explains her contented expression
(Tucker and Zsofia p.31). Two hearts may be seen inside Fridas' chests: one that appears to be
completely whole and healthy, while the other appears to be ripped open and flowing with blood
from the agony of her painful divorce.
What makes this piece stand out from others is the emotion it evokes, as well as the
strength it gives Frida to cure herself by finding her inner strength again. There are many distinct
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color schemes and themes in The Two Fridas, ranging from warm to chilly and light to dark
(Tucker and Zsofia p.31). For example, her alter ego's outfit is a considerably more brilliant
color choice for The Two Fridas. According to the "Traditional Frida" portrayal of Kahlo's
strong and independent self, she's seen as wearing brightly colored traditional Tehuana attire,
which has been painted to symbolize the culture (Tucker and Zsofia p.31). In addition to
catching the viewers' attention, Kahlo's use of vibrant colors communicates something about her
own culture and personal experiences for many viewers, while also giving an incentive for new
students to comprehend or notice these things for themselves (Tucker and Zsofia p.31). There is
a sense of danger in Kahlo's painting of the wounded heart oozing blood on her white garment,
but her pain seems to outweigh her ability to be concerned.
Frida, who has been brokenhearted for a long time, appears to be numb from the sorrow
(Tucker and Zsofia p.32). Both Fridas have the same facial expressions, but their behaviors and
body language reveal the emotions they are feeling. Dark greys, blacks, and whites make up the
skyline behind the two women. Do we have a firm grasp on our own selves? How are folks
around us perceiving us? In a world where perfectionism has taken over and ruled, being
yourself is the only real beauty an individual has to offer.
There is a tendency in today's society to undervalue the importance of being at peace with
oneself over obtaining "Likes" from others. It's in our nature to show what's essential to us, but a
self-portrait isn't any different in that respect (Tucker and Zsofia p.33). Just like Kahlo and
Leyster accomplished in their self-portraits, putting as much care into getting the correct lighting,
having the greatest hair, or having the most beautiful backdrop gives us a story about why we
photographed or made the self-portrait from the first place.
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In conclusion, if we compare the Photograph and The Two Fridas to today's equivalent of
a "Selfie," we see that their common purpose of narrative is still paramount. With or without a
camera, the story of the person being depicted and what is happening on any given day, moment,
or even year is still the primary emphasis. People will always criticize, comment, and view self-
portraits because we are more obsessed than ever before with what other individuals can do and
why they're doing it. The only real difference between now and before is the remote access we
all have to one another today through social media.
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Works Cited
Bán, Zsófia, and Jim Tucker. "The Two Fridas." World Literature Today 83.5 (2009): 30-33.
Kahlo, Frida, and Guy A. Hubbard. The Two Fridas. Art, Architecture and Engineering Library,
1939.
Lindauer, Margaret A. (1999). Devouring Frida: The Art History and Popular Celebrity of Frida
Kahlo. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press. pp. 144149.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Student’s Name Professor’s Name Course Date Comparison Essay on "The Two Fridas," Introduction Frida Kahlo's oil painting, The Two Fridas (translated as "The Two Fridas"), is known as La Dos Fridas in Spanish. Her first large-scale work, it's widely regarded as one of her finest pieces of work. It's a double portrait of Kahlo, showing two different aspects of herself sitting side by side. (Kahlo et al.) One is dressed in a white Victorian-style European gown, and the other is dressed in a traditional Tehuana gown.. Kahlo separated Diego Rivera in 1939, and that year she painted this painting (Kahlo et al.). There are some art historians who believe the two characters in the artwork reflect Frida's two families, one Spanish and one Mexican. Her grandmother, Matilde Calderon, was Spanish and Amerindian, while her dad, Guillermo Kahlo, was German. According to this theory, Diego Rivera admired the Tehuana Frida, whereas he rejected the European Frida because she was too European. According to Frida's memories, the artwork depicts a childhood memory of an imaginary acquaintance (Kahlo et al.). Both Fridas have objects in their laps: the Mexican one has a little Diego Rivera portrait, while the European one has forceps. A ruptured blood artery, severed by the forceps, leaks down the white frock of the European Frida. The blood vessel, which runs from one Frida's hand to the other's heart, unites the two Fridas. There are references to Frida Kahlo's painful existence as well as the Aztec custom of human sacrifice in the artwork (Kahlo et al.). Despite being created shortly after her 2 separation, Kahlo's European Frida is lacking one of her most defining characteristics, a relationship with her own Diego. Comparison on "The Two Fridas," As she has stated, her work is derived from personal truth rather than a visionary source Thus, her paintings appear to have served as a vehicle for contemplation. She turned to painting as an outlet for her feelings of boredom after a series of traumatic events in her life. Her initial career goal was to become a doctor (Lindauer et al. 142). Nevertheless, a life altering unfortunate incident, that also left woman constrained to her room for the next year, made her quit this vision and she began painting instead. This painting was completed right after her split from Diego Rivera, according to the artist's chronology. Their union had only lasted a whirlwind decade. The couple had found love at the period while he was assisting her achieve better on her paintings. Most likely, the tale of her harrowing life served as inspiration for both the artwork and her union with Diego (Lindauer et al. 143). For the painting's two personas to be distinguished, one must comprehend situations of their life. Besides the disaster, she had withstood numerous miscarriages, induced abortion and more than forty procedures on her body. When she was a child, she dreamed of being mother to a few children. This was complicated, however, by the accident's consequences. Clearly, she had high hopes for her marriage to Diego, but instead all she received was an unhappy marriage marred by recurrent adultery that ended in divorce (Lindauer et al. 144). She was also politically active and devoted to her country, frequently speaking out in favor of the rights of peasants. There are two different representations of Frida in the painting. Possibly from her marriage to Diego, the first Frida is wearing a white gown (Lindauer et al. 144). The other Frida, dressed in a blue costume typical of Spanish villagers among someone she had always identified, 3 sits across from her. Both Fridas' hearts are exposed, and an artery runs between them. A set of medical clippers are clutched in the hands of the first Frida's bloodied hands as her clothing is ripped to shreds. (Lindauer et al. 145)Unlike the other Frida, whom appears happy and relaxed, this one appears dejected and drained. Even though the second Frida's heart is also on display, it is whole. The two Fridas are clutching a small portrait of Diego that the first Frida is holding in her other hand. The picture can be used to make a number of interesting comparisons, but the most of them will be with respect to differences. Both Fridas in the artwork are the real Frida Kahlo, although they have different personas (Lindauer et al. 145). That's about it. The first Frida shows the pain of the artist. Her crushed heart serves as a reminder of her shattered hopes for a happy marriage with her beloved husband. The long, traditional white dress she's wearing is meant to conceal her physical insecurities (Lindauer et al. 145). She is still clinging to her passions like her profession and her family since the surgical scissors stop the blood from leaking out of the artery. It could also be a reflection of her ambition to become a parent, which was dashed in the disaster. It's easy to see how much anguish she's been through by looking at the blood spots on her white clothing. This Frida is frightened and restricted by the harsh facts of her existence, which are largely comprised of traumatic events. She lacks self-assurance due to the limitations imposed on her by societal and cultural conventions. The philosophies of the artist, on the other hand, can be used to create a comparison. Frida wears an outfit from the previous century, which was fashionable in the West at the time (Lindauer et al. 144). Diego, in contrast to Frida, was receptive to western beliefs. She pictured herself living like the Mexican peasants who ruled the 4 country at the time. Frida yearned for the typical life of a wife in a patriarchal culture after Mexico's revolution. As a result of his desire to conform to Western social conventions and demonstrate his power, Diego committed adultery in order to have children with his mistress (Tucker and Zsofia p.30). Because of her inability to fit in, she was abandoned and left with a broken heart after being rejected by her spouse. This contributed to her overall misery. The medical blades would be used to sever her ties with Diego, who exhibits a complete lack of empathy for her predicament. It's the artery and touching that bind Frida's two figures together. Both characters represent the same individual, and while they are distinct, they represent a certain period in the life of the artist (Tucker and Zsofia p.30). The second Frida, on the other hand, exudes selfassurance and even appears to be content. Frida is clearly the Frida she always envisioned herself to be, unafraid of the difficulties life can throw her way. The cord that holds Diego's image in her palm represents the umbilical cord (Tucker and Zsofia p.30). This demonstrates that she viewed Diego as more than just her husband; she viewed him as a child who needed her care. This Frida, on the other hand, is looking to redeem herself after a life of misery. Her heart's completeness denotes someone who has recovered and is no longer burdened by the wounds inflicted on the first. It also harkens back to a happier time when she was still in love with Diego, which explains her contented expression (Tucker and Zsofia p.31). Two hearts may be seen inside Fridas' chests: one that appears to be completely whole and healthy, while the other appears to be ripped open and flowing with blood from the agony of her painful divorce. What makes this piece stand out from others is the emotion it evokes, as well as the strength it gives Frida to cure herself by finding her inner strength again. There are many distinct 5 color schemes and themes in The Two Fridas, ranging from warm to chilly and light to dark (Tucker and Zsofia p.31). For example, her alter ego's outfit is a considerably more brilliant color choice for The Two Fridas. According to the "Traditional Frida" portrayal of Kahlo's strong and independent self, she's seen as wearing brightly colored traditional Tehuana attire, which has been painted to symbolize the culture (Tucker and Zsofia p.31). In addition to catching the viewers' attention, Kahlo's use of vibrant colors communicates something about her own culture and personal experiences for many viewers, while also giving an incentive for new students to comprehend or notice these things for themselves (Tucker and Zsofia p.31). There is a sense of danger in Kahlo's painting of the wounded heart oozing blood on her white garment, but her pain seems to outweigh her ability to be concerned. Frida, who has been brokenhearted for a long time, appears to be numb from the sorrow (Tucker and Zsofia p.32). Both Fridas have the same facial expressions, but their behaviors and body language reveal the emotions they are feeling. Dark greys, blacks, and whites make up the skyline behind the two women. Do we have a firm grasp on our own selves? How are folks around us perceiving us? In a world where perfectionism has taken over and ruled, being yourself is the only real beauty an individual has to offer. There is a tendency in today's society to undervalue the importance of being at peace with oneself over obtaining "Likes" from others. It's in our nature to show what's essential to us, but a self-portrait isn't any different in that respect (Tucker and Zsofia p.33). Just like Kahlo and Leyster accomplished in their self-portraits, putting as much care into getting the correct lighting, having the greatest hair, or having the most beautiful backdrop gives us a story about why we photographed or made the self-portrait from the first place. 6 In conclusion, if we compare the Photograph and The Two Fridas to today's equivalent of a "Selfie," we see that their common purpose of narrative is still paramount. With or without a camera, the story of the person being depicted and what is happening on any given day, moment, or even year is still the primary emphasis. People will always criticize, comment, and view selfportraits because we are more obsessed than ever before with what other individuals can do and why they're doing it. The only real difference between now and before is the remote access we all have to one another today through social media. 7 Works Cited Bán, Zsófia, and Jim Tucker. "The Two Fridas." World Literature Today 83.5 (2009): 30-33. Kahlo, Frida, and Guy A. Hubbard. The Two Fridas. Art, Architecture and Engineering Library, 1939. Lindauer, Margaret A. (1999). Devouring Frida: The Art History and Popular Celebrity of Frida Kahlo. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press. pp. 144–149. Name: Description: ...
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