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DLSU SOPSYCH
Social Psychology: Altruism
Stephen Post’s journal article entitled “Altruism, Happiness and Health: It’s Good to be Good”
talks about the strong relationship between a person’s altruistic behavior and well-being. It stresses
that when an individual unselfishly helps other people, their physical and mental health improves
drastically. The article exhaustively discussed previous studies (Midlarsky, 1991; Musick &
Wilson, 2003; Krause, Ingersoll-Dayton, Liang, and Sugisawa) on altruism and its effects to an
individual.
Midlarsky (1991) found out that how altruism is beneficial to people. People who employ altruistic
behavior towards other tend to develop social integration, to forget their own problems, to have
high self-efficacy and to improve their attitude and lifestyle.
Musick & Wilson (2003) discussed how altruism helps reduce depressive symptoms and enhance
an individual’s happiness and well-being.
Krause, Ingersoll-Dayton, Liang, and Sugisawa’s (1999) research asserted that adults who
generously provided assistance to others had better physical health than others who don’t.
NOTES:
The entire article specifically delves into the idea about how helping others can improve one’s
mood and later one’s lifestyle. People feel good about themselves when they help others who carry
a lot of burden. Knowing that they made someone’s life a little less difficult makes their own lives
more bearable. This behavior is simply a cycle wherein when we are in a good mood, we are more
than willing to help others, and when we are able to help others, we sustain the positive aura within
us. The littlest things may mean more like by simply holding the door open for a stranger or helping
a friend carry his/her things. These small things can change someone’s life for the better. With this
kind of behavior, people can also develop humility and gratitude.

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DLSU SOPSYCH Social Psychology: Altruism Stephen Post’s journal article entitled “Altruism, Happiness and Health: It’s Good to be Good” talks about the strong relationship between a person’s altruistic behavior and well-being. It stresses that when an individual unselfishly helps other people, their physical and mental health improves drastically. The article exhaustively discussed previous studies (Midlarsky, 1991; Musick & Wilson, 2003; Krause, Ingersoll-Dayton, Liang, and Sugisawa) on altruism and its effects to an individual. Midlarsky (1991) found out that how altruism is beneficial to people. People who employ altruistic behavior towards other tend to develop social integration, to forget their own problems, to have high self-efficacy and to improve their attitude and lifestyle. Musick & Wilson (2003) discussed how altruism helps reduce depressive symptoms and enhance an individual’s happiness and well-being. Krause, Ingersoll-Dayton, Liang, and Sugisawa’s (1999) research asserted that adults who generously provided assistance to others had better physical health than others who don’t. NOTES: The entire article specifically delves into the idea about how helping others can improve one’s mood and later one’s lifestyle. People feel good about themselves when they help others who carry a lot of burden. Knowing that they made someone’s life a little less difficult makes their own lives more bearable. This behavior is simply a cycle wherein when we are in a good mood, we are more than willing to help others, and when we are able to help others, we sustain the positive aura within us. The littlest things may mean more like by simply holding the door open for a stranger or helping a friend carry his/her things. These small things can change someone’s life for the better. With this kind of behavior, people can also develop humility and gratitude. Name: Description: ...
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