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Pythagorean theorem
My favorite math formula is the Pythagorean Theorem. Because a large aspect of mathematics
is covered by that association. The lesson of trigonometry is 100% based on this Pythagorean
Theorem.
Pythagorean Theorem, the well-known geometric theorem that the sum of the squares
on the legs of a right triangle is equal to the square on the hypotenuse (the side
opposite the right angle)or, in familiar algebraic notation,
a
2
+ b
2
= c
2
.
Although the theorem has long been associated with Greek mathematician-
philosopher Pythagoras (c. 570500/490 BCE), it is actually far older. Four Babylonian tablets
from circa 19001600 BCE indicate some knowledge of the theorem, with a very accurate
calculation of the square root of 2 (the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle with the
length of both legs equal to 1) and lists of special integers known as Pythagorean triples that
satisfy it (e.g., 3, 4, and 5; 3
2
+ 4
2
= 5
2
, 9 + 16 = 25). The theorem is mentioned in the
Baudhayana Sulba-sutra of India, which was written between 800 and 400 BCE. Nevertheless,
the theorem came to be credited to Pythagoras. It is also proposition number 47 from Book I
of Euclid’s Elements.

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Pythagorean theorem My favorite math formula is the Pythagorean Theorem. Because a large aspect of mathematics is covered by that association. The lesson of trigonometry is 100% based on this Pythagorean Theorem. Pythagorean Theorem, the well-known geometric theorem that the sum of the squares on the legs of a right triangle is equal to the square on the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle)—or, in familiar algebraic notation, a2 + b2 = c2. Although the theorem has long been associated with Greek mathematicianphilosopher Pythagoras (c. 570–500/490 BCE), it is actually far older. Four Babylonian tablets from circa 1900–1600 BCE indicate some knowledge of the theorem, with a very accurate calculation of the square root of 2 (the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle with the length of both legs equal to 1) and lists of special integers known as Pythagorean triples that satisfy it (e.g., 3, 4, and 5; 32 + 42 = 52, 9 + 16 = 25). The theorem is mentioned in the Baudhayana Sulba-sutra of India, which was written between 800 and 400 BCE. Nevertheless, the theorem came to be credited to Pythagoras. It is also proposition number 47 from Book I of Euclid’s Elements. Name: Description: ...
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