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CHARLES DICKENS
Charles John Huffam Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Landport, Portsea Island (Portsmouth),
Hampshire, to Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 17891863) and John Dickens (17851851). He was the
second of eight children born to Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 17891863) and John Dickens (1785
1851). His father worked as a clerk in the Navy Pay Office and was stationed in the district on a
temporary basis. He asked Christopher Huffam, a rigger in His Majesty's Navy, a gentleman, and the
owner of a well-known enterprise, to be Charles' godfather. Paul Dombey, the owner of a shipping
concern in Dickens' novel Dombey and Son, is said to be based on Huffam (1848).
John Dickens was summoned to London in January 1815, and the family relocated to Norfolk Street in
Fitzrovia. They moved to Sheerness when Charles was four years old, and then to Chatham, Kent, where
he spent his formative years until he was eleven years old. Though he considered himself a "very little
and not-over-particularly-taken-care-of boy," his early upbringing appears to have been lovely.
Dickens was 20 years old in 1832, and he was active and self-assured. He liked popular entertainment and
impersonation, but he didn't have a clear idea of what he wanted to be when he grew up. He did, however,
know he wanted to be famous. He was drawn to the theater and became a member of the Garrick Club
early on. He landed an acting audition at Covent Garden, where he was to be seen by manager George
Bartley and actor Charles Kemble. Dickens diligently studied and planned to resemble comic Charles
Mathews, but he was unable to attend the audition due to a cold. He had begun his career as a writer when
another opportunity arose.
Dickens' first story, "A Dinner at Poplar Walk," was published in the London periodical Monthly
Magazine in 1833. Dickens' uncle on his mother's side, William Barrow, offered him a job on The Mirror
of Parliament, and he first worked in the House of Commons in early 1832.
After a full day's work on Edwin Drood, Dickens suffered another stroke at his home on June 8, 1870. He
never regained consciousness and died at Gads Hill Place the next day. Dickens' mistress Ellen Ternan
and her maids had him taken back to Gads Hill so that the public would not know the truth about their
relationship, according to biographer Claire Tomalin. He was buried in the Poets' Corner of Westminster
Abbey, contrary to his wish to be buried at Rochester Cathedral "in an inexpensive, unostentatious, and
strictly private manner." The following is a printed epitaph that circulated around the time of the funeral.
To the memory of Charles Dickens (England's most popular author), who died on June 9, 1870, at the age
of 58, at his home in Higham, near Rochester, Kent. He sympathized with the poor, the suffering, and the
oppressed, and his passing has left the world without one of England's finest writers.

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CHARLES DICKENS Charles John Huffam Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Landport, Portsea Island (Portsmouth), Hampshire, to Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 1789–1863) and John Dickens (1785–1851). He was the second of eight children born to Elizabeth Dickens (née Barrow; 1789–1863) and John Dickens (1785– 1851). His father worked as a clerk in the Navy Pay Office and was stationed in the district on a temporary basis. He asked Christopher Huffam, a rigger in His Majesty's Navy, a gentleman, and the owner of a well-known enterprise, to be Charles' godfather. Paul Dombey, the owner of a shipping concern in Dickens' novel Dombey and Son, is said to be based on Huffam (1848). John Dickens was summoned to London in January 1815, and the family relocated to Norfolk Street in Fitzrovia. They moved to Sheerness when Charles was four years old, and then to Chatham, Kent, where he spent his formative years until he was eleven years old. Though he considered himself a "very little and not-over-particularly-taken-care-of boy," his early upbringing appears to have been lovely. Dickens was 20 years old in 1832, and he was active and self-assured. He liked popular entertainment and impersonation, but he didn't have a clear idea of what he wanted to be when he grew up. He did, however, know he wanted to be famous. He was drawn to the theater and became a member of the Garrick Club early on. He landed an acting audition at Covent Garden, where he was to be seen by manager George Bartley and actor Charles Kemble. Dickens diligently studied and planned to resemble comic Charles Mathews, but he was unable to attend the audition due to a cold. He had begun his career as a writer when another opportunity arose. Dickens' first story, "A Dinner at Poplar Walk," was published in the London periodical Monthly Magazine in 1833. Dickens' uncle on his mother's side, William Barrow, offered him a job on The Mirror of Parliament, and he first worked in the House of Commons in early 1832. After a full day's work on Edwin Drood, Dickens suffered another stroke at his home on June 8, 1870. He never regained consciousness and died at Gads Hill Place the next day. Dickens' mistress Ellen Ternan and her maids had him taken back to Gads Hill so that the public would not know the truth about their relationship, according to biographer Claire Tomalin. He was buried in the Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey, contrary to his wish to be buried at Rochester Cathedral "in an inexpensive, unostentatious, and strictly private manner." The following is a printed epitaph that circulated around the time of the funeral. To the memory of Charles Dickens (England's most popular author), who died on June 9, 1870, at the age of 58, at his home in Higham, near Rochester, Kent. He sympathized with the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed, and his passing has left the world without one of England's finest writers. Name: Description: ...
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