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Depression
Student Name
Institution Affiliation
Instructor Name
Course
Date
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Choice #2 Depression
Emily appears to be suffering from depression symptoms. Insomnia, weight loss,
sadness, and a lack of interest in formerly fun activities are symptoms the patient is
experiencing. Furthermore, the patient is at greater risk of depression due to a drastic fall in her
life, losing her work, and her mother's previous medical diagnosis of depression (Vargas &
Perlis, 2020). In order to examine a depressive disorder and its intensity, it will be appropriate
to give her a depression questionnaire.
Emily is thought to be depressed due to her current sign and symptoms. Her signs and
symptoms could be treated with psychotherapy, medication, or a blend of the two. Her mother
was successfully treated with sertraline, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (Vargas & Perlis,
2020). She can be prescribed the same medicine and given a 4-6 weeks period to see if it works,
after which the prescription can be replaced with another SSRI. Medication therapy is not
enough for Emily. She could also benefit from counseling, physical exercise, and a nutritious
diet. These will help her recover from her depression condition.
Emily's age and her childbearing potential influence the treatment of her condition.
Patients aged 18-64 years can be offered SSRIs such as sertraline as a first-line treatment.
Sertraline is also a preferable stimulant to other antidepressants because it has fewer adverse
effects. Start with 50mg of sertraline once a day and see a doctor in a week. The drug can be
increased in 25 mg increments per week until the maximum dose of 200 mg per day is reached.
The medication can be taken even without food; however, it should not be taken with liquor or
herbal medicines (Jorge et al., 2016). If you are planning to become pregnant or are already
pregnant, tell your doctor because sertraline can harm the fetus during the last days of
pregnancy or if you are breastfeeding. It is critical to take medications strictly as recommended;
there should be no extra dosing if a dose is missed; and to report troubling thoughts such as
thoughts of death, as well as deteriorating depression, anxiety, or mania.
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Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, sexual problems, anxiousness, nausea, sleep
disturbances, weight fluctuations, and a changed thyroid level should be monitored. Rapid
escalation, overdosing, drug interaction, or an unpleasant reaction can cause serotonin
syndrome and threaten life. Patients should be taught to contact their primary care provider if
they take any medications at home, even over-the-counter (Jorge et al.,
2016). Tramadol, meperidine, dextromethorphan, and decongestants should not be used since
they interact with SSRIs and cause serotonin syndrome.
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References
Vargas, I., & Perlis, M. L. (2020). Insomnia and depression: clinical associations and possible
mechanistic links. Current opinion in psychology, 34, 95-99.
Jorge, R. E., Acion, L., Burin, D. I., & Robinson, R. G. (2016). Sertraline for preventing
mood disorders following traumatic brain injury: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA
psychiatry, 73(10), 1041-1047.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Depression Student Name Institution Affiliation Instructor Name Course Date 2 Choice #2 Depression Emily appears to be suffering from depression symptoms. Insomnia, weight loss, sadness, and a lack of interest in formerly fun activities are symptoms the patient is experiencing. Furthermore, the patient is at greater risk of depression due to a drastic fall in her life, losing her work, and her mother's previous medical diagnosis of depression (Vargas & Perlis, 2020). In order to examine a depressive disorder and its intensity, it will be appropriate to give her a depression questionnaire. Emily is thought to be depressed due to her current sign and symptoms. Her signs and symptoms could be treated with psychotherapy, medication, or a blend of the two. Her mother was successfully treated with sertraline, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (Vargas & Perlis, 2020). She can be prescribed the same medicine and given a 4-6 weeks period to see if it works, after which the prescription can be replaced with another SSRI. Medication therapy is not enough for Emily. She could also benefit from counseling, physical exercise, and a nutritious diet. These will help her recover from her depression condition. Emily's age and her childbearing potential influence the treatment of her condition. Patients aged 18-64 years can be offered SSRIs such as sertraline as a first-line treatment. Sertraline is also a preferable stimulant to other antidepressants because it has fewer adverse effects. Start with 50mg of sertraline once a day and see a doctor in a week. The drug can be increased in 25 mg increments per week until the maximum dose of 200 mg per day is reached. The medication can be taken even without food; however, it should not be taken with liquor or herbal medicines (Jorge et al., 2016). If you are planning to become pregnant or are already pregnant, tell your doctor because sertraline can harm the fetus during the last days of pregnancy or if you are breastfeeding. It is critical to take medications strictly as recommended; there should be no extra dosing if a dose is missed; and to report troubling thoughts such as thoughts of death, as well as deteriorating depression, anxiety, or mania. 3 Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, sexual problems, anxiousness, nausea, sleep disturbances, weight fluctuations, and a changed thyroid level should be monitored. Rapid escalation, overdosing, drug interaction, or an unpleasant reaction can cause serotonin syndrome and threaten life. Patients should be taught to contact their primary care provider if they take any medications at home, even over-the-counter (Jorge et al., 2016). Tramadol, meperidine, dextromethorphan, and decongestants should not be used since they interact with SSRIs and cause serotonin syndrome. 4 References Vargas, I., & Perlis, M. L. (2020). Insomnia and depression: clinical associations and possible mechanistic links. Current opinion in psychology, 34, 95-99. Jorge, R. E., Acion, L., Burin, D. I., & Robinson, R. G. (2016). Sertraline for preventing mood disorders following traumatic brain injury: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA psychiatry, 73(10), 1041-1047. Name: Description: ...
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