Showing Page:
1/5
American Management
Student’s Name
Course Name
Date
Showing Page:
2/5
1
American management as a whole needs Taylor’s scientific management theory. The
individualistic approach can be the common American management style in a majority of
organizations. Managers are solely accountable for all decisions made within their areas of
responsibility. The decisions are discussed on open forums, but the ultimate responsibilities and
consequences lie with the managers. Mostly, the support and togetherness are likely to evaporate
when things go wrong. The American managers are more likely to turn down the employees' or
subordinates' opinions and pick ideas from other managerial positions.
1
This leads to a poor
relationship between the management and the workers. For an organization to run smoothly,
there is a need for a cohesive relationship between the two parties. It gives why American
organizations are required to adopt Taylor’s scientific management theory to improve their
productivity, profitability, and service delivery.
F.W. Taylor discards the traditional type of management, which places the managers on
top of every organizational operation and disregards employees' roles. He advocates for the
integration of principles of scientific management which helps to develop a good relationship
between the management and employees. According to Taylor's scientific management theory,
science is essential in improving organizational efficiency. It should substitute the "Rule of
Thumb" method that only considers the manager's decisions in every organizational operation.
2
Taylor is concerned with the application of scientific analysis, not trials, intuitions, or hit
methods used by firm managers. In most organizations, employees complain about their
managers' mistreatment and lack of incorporation in decision-making but are blamed when
1
Braverman, Harry. "Scientific management." Class: The Anthology (2017): 437-448.
2
The Economist. Scientific Management (2009). Retrieved
https://www.economist.com/news/2009/02/09/scientific-management
Showing Page:
3/5
2
worse happens. Taylor addresses this issue by encouraging harmony between the management
and workers. He critically states that conflicts between the two have no benefits to either the
management or the workers. Both are always on the losing end. Organizational management
should identify the importance of their workers, considering that their efforts and contribution to
the companies place them in the positions they are in today.
3
This means that workers are equally
as important as the managers and should be handled with great importance.
Taylor suggests there should be a total mental revolution on the management and
workers' part. For a long time, organizational managers have behaved as bosses. They have had a
harsh and unhealthy attitude towards the workers. They forget or ignore the fact that the
prosperity of their companies lies in the hands of the workers who work tirelessly to achieve the
set goals. For that reason, Taylor encourages organizations' management to share part of surplus
with workers, train their employees, and divide tasks based on workers' areas of specialty. Also,
they should encourage teamwork spirit, positive attitude towards workers, sense of discipline,
and sincerity among both parties.
4
There should be mutual trust and understanding developed
focusing on delivering quality services. Individualism in management places an organization at
risk. The organization relies on the decisions made by the manager, and the workers only follow
the directions obligated to them. So, in case of a mistake, the manager becomes the main cause
for not cooperating with the workers to find the most suitable ways to manage certain issues.
That is why Taylor advocates for cooperation but not individualism in the management.
3
The Economist. Scientific Management (2009).
4
Lepore, Jill. “Scientific management started as a way to work. How did it become a way
of life? (2009). Retrieved https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/10/12/not-so-fast
Showing Page:
4/5
3
Managers need to focus on leadership style where there is a development of mutual
cooperation and confidence between the management and the workers. It fosters a sense of
goodwill among them, ensuring that they eliminate internal competition with cooperation. The
management and workers must see the importance of each other. The management should
always welcome their workers’ ideas and suggestions and reward them, especially when their
ideas prove beneficial to the organization's operations by reducing costs and increasing
production.
5
On the other hand, workers should restrain from going on strike and making
unnecessary demands but should have a sense of responsibility for their work and services in
their organizations. Taylor believes that each working in an organization has a specific area of
expertise. The management should understand the efficiency of each individual but not force
tasks on their workers. This calls for training workers after selecting them by use of a scientific
approach. Companies can only attain efficiency by assigning workers tasks that suit them best
physically, mentally, and intellectually.
6
Always, an efficient employee will produce more to
earn more hence benefiting the organization in a big way. Therefore, American organizations
should adopt Taylor’s scientific management theory that also advocates for leadership style.
5
Harry. "Scientific management." : 437-448.
6
Lepore, Jill. “Scientific management started as a way to work. How did it become a way
of life? (2009).
Showing Page:
5/5
4
Bibliography
Braverman, Harry. "Scientific management." Class: The Anthology (2017): 437-448.
Lepore, Jill. “Scientific management started as a way to work. How did it become a way of life?
(2009). Retrieved https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/10/12/not-so-fast
The Economist. Scientific Management (2009). Retrieved
https://www.economist.com/news/2009/02/09/scientific-management

Unformatted Attachment Preview

American Management Student’s Name Course Name Date 1 American management as a whole needs Taylor’s scientific management theory. The individualistic approach can be the common American management style in a majority of organizations. Managers are solely accountable for all decisions made within their areas of responsibility. The decisions are discussed on open forums, but the ultimate responsibilities and consequences lie with the managers. Mostly, the support and togetherness are likely to evaporate when things go wrong. The American managers are more likely to turn down the employees' or subordinates' opinions and pick ideas from other managerial positions.1 This leads to a poor relationship between the management and the workers. For an organization to run smoothly, there is a need for a cohesive relationship between the two parties. It gives why American organizations are required to adopt Taylor’s scientific management theory to improve their productivity, profitability, and service delivery. F.W. Taylor discards the traditional type of management, which places the managers on top of every organizational operation and disregards employees' roles. He advocates for the integration of principles of scientific management which helps to develop a good relationship between the management and employees. According to Taylor's scientific management theory, science is essential in improving organizational efficiency. It should substitute the "Rule of Thumb" method that only considers the manager's decisions in every organizational operation.2 Taylor is concerned with the application of scientific analysis, not trials, intuitions, or hit methods used by firm managers. In most organizations, employees complain about their managers' mistreatment and lack of incorporation in decision-making but are blamed when 1 2 Braverman, Harry. "Scientific management." Class: The Anthology (2017): 437-448. The Economist. Scientific Management (2009). Retrieved https://www.economist.com/news/2009/02/09/scientific-management 2 worse happens. Taylor addresses this issue by encouraging harmony between the management and workers. He critically states that conflicts between the two have no benefits to either the management or the workers. Both are always on the losing end. Organizational management should identify the importance of their workers, considering that their efforts and contribution to the companies place them in the positions they are in today.3 This means that workers are equally as important as the managers and should be handled with great importance. Taylor suggests there should be a total mental revolution on the management and workers' part. For a long time, organizational managers have behaved as bosses. They have had a harsh and unhealthy attitude towards the workers. They forget or ignore the fact that the prosperity of their companies lies in the hands of the workers who work tirelessly to achieve the set goals. For that reason, Taylor encourages organizations' management to share part of surplus with workers, train their employees, and divide tasks based on workers' areas of specialty. Also, they should encourage teamwork spirit, positive attitude towards workers, sense of discipline, and sincerity among both parties.4 There should be mutual trust and understanding developed focusing on delivering quality services. Individualism in management places an organization at risk. The organization relies on the decisions made by the manager, and the workers only follow the directions obligated to them. So, in case of a mistake, the manager becomes the main cause for not cooperating with the workers to find the most suitable ways to manage certain issues. That is why Taylor advocates for cooperation but not individualism in the management. 3 The Economist. Scientific Management (2009). Lepore, Jill. “Scientific management started as a way to work. How did it become a way of life?” (2009). Retrieved https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/10/12/not-so-fast 4 3 Managers need to focus on leadership style where there is a development of mutual cooperation and confidence between the management and the workers. It fosters a sense of goodwill among them, ensuring that they eliminate internal competition with cooperation. The management and workers must see the importance of each other. The management should always welcome their workers’ ideas and suggestions and reward them, especially when their ideas prove beneficial to the organization's operations by reducing costs and increasing production.5 On the other hand, workers should restrain from going on strike and making unnecessary demands but should have a sense of responsibility for their work and services in their organizations. Taylor believes that each working in an organization has a specific area of expertise. The management should understand the efficiency of each individual but not force tasks on their workers. This calls for training workers after selecting them by use of a scientific approach. Companies can only attain efficiency by assigning workers tasks that suit them best physically, mentally, and intellectually.6 Always, an efficient employee will produce more to earn more hence benefiting the organization in a big way. Therefore, American organizations should adopt Taylor’s scientific management theory that also advocates for leadership style. 5 Harry. "Scientific management." : 437-448. Lepore, Jill. “Scientific management started as a way to work. How did it become a way of life?” (2009). 6 4 Bibliography Braverman, Harry. "Scientific management." Class: The Anthology (2017): 437-448. Lepore, Jill. “Scientific management started as a way to work. How did it become a way of life?” (2009). Retrieved https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/10/12/not-so-fast The Economist. Scientific Management (2009). Retrieved https://www.economist.com/news/2009/02/09/scientific-management Name: Description: ...
User generated content is uploaded by users for the purposes of learning and should be used following Studypool's honor code & terms of service.
Studypool
4.7
Trustpilot
4.5
Sitejabber
4.4