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Analysis of President Bush's September 14, 2001 Bullhorn Speech and Malala Yousafzai's
Nobel Prize Lecture
Student's Name
Tutor
Institutional Affiliation
Course
Date
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General and Specific Purposes in President Bush's Address
On September 20, 2001, George W. Bush delivered a nationally televised address to the
American people in which he outlined the threat posed by al-Qaeda and the need for a new war
on terror. The speech's general purpose was to address the terrorist attacks of September 11,
2001, specifically who was responsible for them. During his address, Al Qaeda was simply one
of several terrorist organizations that President Bush hoped to galvanize the public against. To
begin, Bush says, "Americans have known the victims of war, but not in the heart of a
magnificent city on a quiet morning. This is the first time that thousands of civilians have been
targeted in a surprise strike. In a single day, we were plunged into a foreign world, one in which
freedom itself is under siege" (Mullan, 2015). As a result, it was easier to discuss Al Qaeda's
tactics and strategy moving forward. He reveals the person he wants to turn the audience against
using this method. "Our battle on terror begins with Al Qaeda, but it does not end there," states
the speech's explicit goal. Every terrorist organization with worldwide reach must be discovered,
halted, and defeated before the war can be declared over (Mullan, 2015). Our article defines a
specified objective as having three qualities: identifying the outcome without indicating how it
will be reached, summarizing the notion, and being precise. This line follows these three
characteristics. Even though he does go on to discuss techniques to do this, he leaves them open-
ended. As a result, he sets the stage for the audience to rally behind his words and support the
fight against terror.
President Bush compliments Afghan Muslims' religious beliefs and implores them to
hand over the detainees. This may be seen as a selective perception by the Muslim audience.
They are, in a way defying their own religious beliefs by handing over the Taliban. They may
also be at risk from the Taliban. You're either with the terrorists or with us, says President Bush.
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He's putting the onus on the audience to decide between them and us. "The United Nations,"
President Bush said in his piece, "The World Now Facing a Test."
According to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, the Iraqi regime's
persecution is ubiquitous, which stated that the country continues to perpetrate severe human
rights breaches. He referred to it as "Our Common Challenge" in an essay he wrote. My country
will join the UN Security Council in tackling this common problem. If the Iraqi dictatorship
continues to defy us, the international community must take firm action to hold Iraq accountable.
We'll cooperate with the UN Security Council to get the job done(Mullan, 2015). When
President Bush called on our soldiers to "be ready," he encouraged them. President Bush gave a
graduating speech at the United States Military Academy almost a year after the horrible terrorist
attacks. This year's commencement speech perfectly echoes his remarks from the previous year.
The graduating address was now about putting his plan into action after telling the soldiers to "be
ready and make us proud. He took advantage of the opportunity to revisit the graduating class
and remind them of what had transpired a year prior. President Bush said he would do everything
he could to help the military "win the long war that lies ahead.
Throughout the world, President Bush fostered a good ethos. That goes for international
relations as well as domestic ones. Terrorism was not limited to the United States, though; it
occurred worldwide(Mullan, 2015). He encouraged the rest of the globe to band together in the
face of these threats.
General and Specific Purposes in Malala Yousafzai's Address
Malala's speech focuses on universal access to a great education, women's rights, and
peace worldwide. With stories from her own life and her belief in the need for education for
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young girls, she elicits an emotional response from her audience. Malala Yousafzai's overarching
message was to raise awareness about education for youngsters, particularly for females. In my
opinion, she was able to educate the public by attracting the attention of her target audience. She
connected with her audience because of her compelling remarks and first-hand
anecdotes(Yousafzai, 2014). She presented a compelling reason to listen to her speech since she
had a near-fatal encounter with the Taliban and survived and now works to collect money and
aid children in eastern nations, despite the dangers she faced. She has a powerful speaking voice
and is a champion for women's rights, children's education, and global peace!
Malala would frequently repeat sentences in her speech. Anaphora is used throughout her
speech, such as towards the conclusion when she says, "Let this be the final time...". Further, she
expresses her desire for this to be the final instance in which children are denied access to quality
education. Because she uses it repeatedly to emphasize her major point, this technique is crucial.
She frequently poses rhetorical questions during her discourse on war and education (Yousafzai,
2014). Among her many inquiries are: Why do we spend money on armaments but not books?
And why do we build tanks but not schools? The purpose of posing these questions was to
persuade the audience to pause and reflect on our society's current state of affairs.
Types and Quality of Supporting Materials Used by President Bush Supporting Material
In his 2001 address to the nation speech, President Bush used a range of supporting
material, starting with personal experience, examples, and testimony in the opening paragraph.
He implies that the state of the union is strong because of the brave activities of individuals who
fought back against the plan and made an example of one of the citizens who aided who died
doing so. Inviting his wife to the speech, which received long and loud applause, was made even
more personal(Yousafzai, 2014). All of the audience members present on September 11 shared
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the same personal experience. This was demonstrated by terrorists' jet being brought down by a
passenger, Todd Beamer, before it could cause any further damage. Lisa Beamer, the husband's
wife, was in the room as a witness so that the audience might relate to the event. When someone
other than the speaker gives their testimony, it is considered a testimony. Even though Lisa
Beemer didn't say anything, her very presence served as a symbol of the strength of the
American people and a stirring preamble to the speech that followed.
Types and Quality of Supporting Materials Used by Malala Yousafzai Supporting Material
Malay uses several supporting materials like visual aids such as photos and videos to add
credibility and raise awareness. Her use of imagery may be seen in the following sentence: "That
night, a streak of intense white light shot over the sky, illuminating the room for a second as
though on a camera. "Boom!... We slumber fell asleep" (Yousafzai, 2014). The reader can
imagine what is happening in Pakistan after reading this. When the Taliban wants to destroy
anything not Islamic, it is up to her to inform her audience what it is like to go through it every
day. When Malala was in Swat, "a paradise of tourism and beauty, suddenly converted into a site
of terrorism," she utilized another example of imagery in her Nobel Peace Prize speech
(Yousafzai, 2014). Because she begins by presenting Swat as a lovely place full of tourists from
all over the world, she employs imagery in her writing. A place of terrorism, where no man,
woman, or kid is fully safe, is then contrasted to how it was in the past. Using this as an example
of what the Taliban has done in Swat is a way for Malala to express her message that she wants
peace in the region.
3. Rhetorical Situation Research Memo Supporting Material for Your Rhetorical
Situation Speech (Part 2: Lesson 4)
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Exigence for that speech (what imperfection gets corrected in the speech you are
analyzing?)
The USS Arizona has seen burning after the attack by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor
Exigence for your speech (what imperfection gets corrected when your audience hears
your speech?)
As well as a joint session of Congress, Roosevelt spoke to an audience throughout the country
via radio. Only Jeanette Rankin, a Montana pacifist, voted against the war in the House of
Representatives.
Audience Analysis (what does your audience already think, know, or believe about your
topic?)
I believe my audience is unaware of the present state of affairs. Thus, I believe this will be an
excellent subject matter to throw some light.
General purpose for your speech: Choose either "to strengthen commitment" or "to
weaken commitment." See Zarefsky Ch. 6.
I intend to increase the level of commitment from the audience to the necessity of modernizing
the country's unity.
The specific purpose for your speech. See Zarefsky Ch. 6.
We must protect our country's tranquility from outsiders to modernize it.
Thesis (the central critical claim you are making in your speech see Zarefsky Ch. 6):
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(Fill in the blank) _______________________________________ is / is not (choose one) a
fitting response to its rhetorical situation.
Japanese attack by Pearl Harbor
Complete the claim/supporting evidence section below. You might not have 3 pieces of
supporting evidence for each section, or you might have more edit this outline shell
accordingly. Please cite your sources at the end of your main points in the style you are
most familiar with (such as APA, MLA, or Chicago).
A)
To support his claim that the United States was a victim of unprovoked Japanese
aggression, Roosevelt's speech emphasized patriotism rather than idealism. Roosevelt used the
concept of kairos, which refers to the urgency with which one speaks. It made the speech more
forceful and meaningful in terms of rhetorical significance (Helfrich et al., 2002). To paraphrase
scholar Sandra Silberstein, Roosevelt followed a long history of presidents wielding exceptional
authority as commander-in-chief by using linguistic norms to suppress dissent, demonize
adversaries, and sacrifice lives in defense of a country once more unified under God.
B)
The citizens of the United States were horrified. A breakdown in diplomatic ties between
the United States and Japan was not imminent when the incident occurred (Roosevelt, 1941).
Immediate preparation for war was sparked by the occurrence, which galvanized support for
increased military readiness in the United States.
B)
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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt subsequently prepared a second draft and marked
up with alterations that improved the speech's tone and content. The most important adjustment
he made was the opening sentence, which read, "a day which will live in global history."
C)
Roosevelt delivered a speech to a joint session of Congress and the whole country over
the radio (Roosevelt, 1941). Only Montana pacifist Jeanette Rankin abstained in the House of
Representatives, which followed the Senate's lead and voted unanimously in favor of war. At
four o'clock in the afternoon,
D)
Grace Tully, the President's secretary, calmly and firmly dictated to him a request for a
declaration of war to Congress. Rather than reciting Japanese betrayal in detail, as Secretary of
State Cordell Hull had suggested, he had constructed the speech in his brain before giving it.
E)
A joint session of Congress heard Franklin D. Roosevelt's "The Infamy Address," given
on December 8, 1941 (Helfrich et al., 2002). The assault on Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, and the
Philippines by the Empire of Japan on the previous day, and the declaration of war on the United
States and the British Empire.
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9
References
Helfrich, M., & Reynolds, S. (2002). Day of infamy: a social psychologist and rhetorician
examine the effects of instigative, patriotic discourse. The Journal of American
Culture, 25(3/4), 327.
Mullan, J. (2015). The Decider: George W Bush and His Use of Presidential Power.
Roosevelt, F. D. (1941, December). Day of Infamy speech. In delivered to a joint session of
Congress (Vol. 8).
Yousafzai, M. (2014). Nobel lecture. Speech presented at the Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies,
Oslo, Norway.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

1 Analysis of President Bush's September 14, 2001 Bullhorn Speech and Malala Yousafzai's Nobel Prize Lecture Student's Name Tutor Institutional Affiliation Course Date 2 General and Specific Purposes in President Bush's Address On September 20, 2001, George W. Bush delivered a nationally televised address to the American people in which he outlined the threat posed by al-Qaeda and the need for a new war on terror. The speech's general purpose was to address the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, specifically who was responsible for them. During his address, Al Qaeda was simply one of several terrorist organizations that President Bush hoped to galvanize the public against. To begin, Bush says, "Americans have known the victims of war, but not in the heart of a magnificent city on a quiet morning. This is the first time that thousands of civilians have been targeted in a surprise strike. In a single day, we were plunged into a foreign world, one in which freedom itself is under siege" (Mullan, 2015). As a result, it was easier to discuss Al Qaeda's tactics and strategy moving forward. He reveals the person he wants to turn the audience against using this method. "Our battle on terror begins with Al Qaeda, but it does not end there," states the speech's explicit goal. Every terrorist organization with worldwide reach must be discovered, halted, and defeated before the war can be declared over (Mullan, 2015). Our article defines a specified objective as having three qualities: identifying the outcome without indicating how it will be reached, summarizing the notion, and being precise. This line follows these three characteristics. Even though he does go on to discuss techniques to do this, he leaves them openended. As a result, he sets the stage for the audience to rally behind his words and support the fight against terror. President Bush compliments Afghan Muslims' religious beliefs and implores them to hand over the detainees. This may be seen as a selective perception by the Muslim audience. They are, in a way defying their own religious beliefs by handing over the Taliban. They may also be at risk from the Taliban. You're either with the terrorists or with us, says President Bush. 3 He's putting the onus on the audience to decide between them and us. "The United Nations," President Bush said in his piece, "The World Now Facing a Test." According to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, the Iraqi regime's persecution is ubiquitous, which stated that the country continues to perpetrate severe human rights breaches. He referred to it as "Our Common Challenge" in an essay he wrote. My country will join the UN Security Council in tackling this common problem. If the Iraqi dictatorship continues to defy us, the international community must take firm action to hold Iraq accountable. We'll cooperate with the UN Security Council to get the job done(Mullan, 2015). When President Bush called on our soldiers to "be ready," he encouraged them. President Bush gave a graduating speech at the United States Military Academy almost a year after the horrible terrorist attacks. This year's commencement speech perfectly echoes his remarks from the previous year. The graduating address was now about putting his plan into action after telling the soldiers to "be ready and make us proud. He took advantage of the opportunity to revisit the graduating class and remind them of what had transpired a year prior. President Bush said he would do everything he could to help the military "win the long war that lies ahead. Throughout the world, President Bush fostered a good ethos. That goes for international relations as well as domestic ones. Terrorism was not limited to the United States, though; it occurred worldwide(Mullan, 2015). He encouraged the rest of the globe to band together in the face of these threats. General and Specific Purposes in Malala Yousafzai's Address Malala's speech focuses on universal access to a great education, women's rights, and peace worldwide. With stories from her own life and her belief in the need for education for 4 young girls, she elicits an emotional response from her audience. Malala Yousafzai's overarching message was to raise awareness about education for youngsters, particularly for females. In my opinion, she was able to educate the public by attracting the attention of her target audience. She connected with her audience because of her compelling remarks and first-hand anecdotes(Yousafzai, 2014). She presented a compelling reason to listen to her speech since she had a near-fatal encounter with the Taliban and survived and now works to collect money and aid children in eastern nations, despite the dangers she faced. She has a powerful speaking voice and is a champion for women's rights, children's education, and global peace! Malala would frequently repeat sentences in her speech. Anaphora is used throughout her speech, such as towards the conclusion when she says, "Let this be the final time...". Further, she expresses her desire for this to be the final instance in which children are denied access to quality education. Because she uses it repeatedly to emphasize her major point, this technique is crucial. She frequently poses rhetorical questions during her discourse on war and education (Yousafzai, 2014). Among her many inquiries are: Why do we spend money on armaments but not books? And why do we build tanks but not schools? The purpose of posing these questions was to persuade the audience to pause and reflect on our society's current state of affairs. Types and Quality of Supporting Materials Used by President Bush Supporting Material In his 2001 address to the nation speech, President Bush used a range of supporting material, starting with personal experience, examples, and testimony in the opening paragraph. He implies that the state of the union is strong because of the brave activities of individuals who fought back against the plan and made an example of one of the citizens who aided who died doing so. Inviting his wife to the speech, which received long and loud applause, was made even more personal(Yousafzai, 2014). All of the audience members present on September 11 shared 5 the same personal experience. This was demonstrated by terrorists' jet being brought down by a passenger, Todd Beamer, before it could cause any further damage. Lisa Beamer, the husband's wife, was in the room as a witness so that the audience might relate to the event. When someone other than the speaker gives their testimony, it is considered a testimony. Even though Lisa Beemer didn't say anything, her very presence served as a symbol of the strength of the American people and a stirring preamble to the speech that followed. Types and Quality of Supporting Materials Used by Malala Yousafzai Supporting Material Malay uses several supporting materials like visual aids such as photos and videos to add credibility and raise awareness. Her use of imagery may be seen in the following sentence: "That night, a streak of intense white light shot over the sky, illuminating the room for a second as though on a camera. "Boom!... We slumber fell asleep" (Yousafzai, 2014). The reader can imagine what is happening in Pakistan after reading this. When the Taliban wants to destroy anything not Islamic, it is up to her to inform her audience what it is like to go through it every day. When Malala was in Swat, "a paradise of tourism and beauty, suddenly converted into a site of terrorism," she utilized another example of imagery in her Nobel Peace Prize speech (Yousafzai, 2014). Because she begins by presenting Swat as a lovely place full of tourists from all over the world, she employs imagery in her writing. A place of terrorism, where no man, woman, or kid is fully safe, is then contrasted to how it was in the past. Using this as an example of what the Taliban has done in Swat is a way for Malala to express her message that she wants peace in the region. 3. Rhetorical Situation Research Memo Supporting Material for Your Rhetorical Situation Speech (Part 2: Lesson 4) 6 Exigence for that speech (what imperfection gets corrected in the speech you are analyzing?) The USS Arizona has seen burning after the attack by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor Exigence for your speech (what imperfection gets corrected when your audience hears your speech?) As well as a joint session of Congress, Roosevelt spoke to an audience throughout the country via radio. Only Jeanette Rankin, a Montana pacifist, voted against the war in the House of Representatives. Audience Analysis (what does your audience already think, know, or believe about your topic?) I believe my audience is unaware of the present state of affairs. Thus, I believe this will be an excellent subject matter to throw some light. General purpose for your speech: Choose either "to strengthen commitment" or "to weaken commitment." See Zarefsky Ch. 6. I intend to increase the level of commitment from the audience to the necessity of modernizing the country's unity. The specific purpose for your speech. See Zarefsky Ch. 6. We must protect our country's tranquility from outsiders to modernize it. Thesis (the central critical claim you are making in your speech – see Zarefsky Ch. 6): 7 (Fill in the blank) _______________________________________ is / is not (choose one) a fitting response to its rhetorical situation. Japanese attack by Pearl Harbor Complete the claim/supporting evidence section below. You might not have 3 pieces of supporting evidence for each section, or you might have more – edit this outline shell accordingly. Please cite your sources at the end of your main points in the style you are most familiar with (such as APA, MLA, or Chicago). A) To support his claim that the United States was a victim of unprovoked Japanese aggression, Roosevelt's speech emphasized patriotism rather than idealism. Roosevelt used the concept of kairos, which refers to the urgency with which one speaks. It made the speech more forceful and meaningful in terms of rhetorical significance (Helfrich et al., 2002). To paraphrase scholar Sandra Silberstein, Roosevelt followed a long history of presidents wielding exceptional authority as commander-in-chief by using linguistic norms to suppress dissent, demonize adversaries, and sacrifice lives in defense of a country once more unified under God. B) The citizens of the United States were horrified. A breakdown in diplomatic ties between the United States and Japan was not imminent when the incident occurred (Roosevelt, 1941). Immediate preparation for war was sparked by the occurrence, which galvanized support for increased military readiness in the United States. B) 8 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt subsequently prepared a second draft and marked up with alterations that improved the speech's tone and content. The most important adjustment he made was the opening sentence, which read, "a day which will live in global history." C) Roosevelt delivered a speech to a joint session of Congress and the whole country over the radio (Roosevelt, 1941). Only Montana pacifist Jeanette Rankin abstained in the House of Representatives, which followed the Senate's lead and voted unanimously in favor of war. At four o'clock in the afternoon, D) Grace Tully, the President's secretary, calmly and firmly dictated to him a request for a declaration of war to Congress. Rather than reciting Japanese betrayal in detail, as Secretary of State Cordell Hull had suggested, he had constructed the speech in his brain before giving it. E) A joint session of Congress heard Franklin D. Roosevelt's "The Infamy Address," given on December 8, 1941 (Helfrich et al., 2002). The assault on Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, and the Philippines by the Empire of Japan on the previous day, and the declaration of war on the United States and the British Empire. 9 References Helfrich, M., & Reynolds, S. (2002). Day of infamy: a social psychologist and rhetorician examine the effects of instigative, patriotic discourse. The Journal of American Culture, 25(3/4), 327. Mullan, J. (2015). The Decider: George W Bush and His Use of Presidential Power. Roosevelt, F. D. (1941, December). Day of Infamy speech. In delivered to a joint session of Congress (Vol. 8). Yousafzai, M. (2014). Nobel lecture. Speech presented at the Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies, Oslo, Norway. Name: Description: ...
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