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Cyber Bullying: An Intervention
PSY610: Applied Social Psychology
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Cyber Bullying: An Intervention
Bullying plays a large role in today’s society, particularly in school environments where
students are still maturing and learning the difference between right and wrong behaviors. It is
now 2017 and Cyber bullying is predominant to other forms of bullying because of the ability to
reach so many, so far away with anonymity. The bullying process can take on a variety of forms,
from verbal and emotional assaults to physical aggression, making it an extremely broad
phenomenon to define. But do these negative actions have to remain a permanent stain on our
society? Is there any way to get rid of its existence?
This is where we start to mention an intervention and the need for one. Numerous
research studies have taken place worldwide in attempts to minimize, with hopes to eliminate,
the bullying phenomenon. But is there an actual need for intervention? Many people often fail
to comprehend the severe necessity of interventions because bullying is often viewed as an
inevitable activity that humans take part in. It is almost impossible to verify this inevitability but
nonetheless, an intervention is very essential to preserve and maintain the well-being of
society. Intervention and other anti-bullying methods are needed so that students may be let
free from the stress, headaches and even psychosomatic disorders that bullying brings upon
them. Furthermore, victims sometimes can be so traumatized that they stop attending school
and other social gatherings altogether which hinders their educational and mental
development. By promoting intervention from an early start, we are promoting and
encouraging bystanders to be more involved in assisting a victim while also discouraging the
bully. Intervention programs also serve as a direct medium to improve the ability of outsiders,
especially adults, to provide the necessary detection of bullying and support to those victims.
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Cyberbullying is not necessarily a new type of bullying in terms of behavior, but it is a
new platform the exudes similar behaviors. Cyberbullying involves nonphysical bullying and
harassing behaviors such as “sending or posting harmful or cruel text or images using the
internet or other digital communication devices such as cell phones” (Feinberg & Robey, 2008).
Unlike normal bullying, cyberbullying is anonymous and can take place anywhere and has
become a serious problem in recent years. Not only is the victim at risk but the one doing the
bullying often has their own issues they are dealing with. A study by Notar, Padgett & Roden
(2013) found students who experienced cyberbullying, both as a victim and an offender, had
significantly lower self-esteem than those who had little or no experience with cyberbullying.
The author goes on to point out that cyberbullying shows negative impacts on schooling,
relationships, and the emotional and psychological health of younger victims, in some cases the
impacts continue into early adulthood.
Cyberbullying is not simply posting something mean online or on a social media page,
there are different avenues. There is cyber harassment, which involves an adult. The adult can
harass a child; the child harasses an adult or adult to adult, repeatedly sending mean, nasty and
or insulting messages to the victim. Cyberstalking: repeatedly sending messages threatening in
nature that are driven to instill fear to the victim. There are also exclusion/gossip groups,
impersonation, outing, phishing, and even sexting just to name a few.
Most cyberbullying among children and adolescents occurs between peers and occurs
as early as second grade. A 2008 study by Smith, Smith, Osborn, and Samara found that
adolescent female victims discovered the cyberbully was considered “someone they knew” 68%
of the time. In 2006, Hinduja and Patchin conducted a study of middle school students, which
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revealed that more than 17% of students revealed they have been victims of cyberbullying at
least once. Seventeen percent reported they cyberbullied others at least once. Furthermore,
12% reported they have been both a victim and an aggressor in cyberbullying situations
(Hinduja & Patchin, 2009). Lastly, a 2006 study conducted by Fight Crime found that more than
13 million students aged 6-17 were victims of cyberbullying (Feinberg & Robey, 2008). With
staggering numbers such as the ones mentioned above, it is clear to see the need for more
programs that advocate prevention with hopes to eliminating it as a whole.
Because of the negative impact cyberbullying has on children, schools must take
immediate action to reduce incidents inside and outside of the school. When the school learns
about incidents of cyberbullying, it first needs to be defined in order to develop a proper
intervention and prevention program. Notar, Padgett and Roden (2013) suggest developing a
map of locations where bullying is more likely to occur, to remind staff to remain vigilant for
evidence of cyberbullying. Distribute a list of indicators that suggest victimization, provide
support groups for students new to the school setting. To also remind staff that bullying may
occur in the form of gay bashing, advice victims to respond appropriately, encourage
bystanders to be friends to the victim and post a code of conduct in all classrooms. Schools
often prohibit the use of cell phones, or any other form of electronics not directly connected to
learning during business hours. When someone becomes the victim of cyber bullying, the one
thing to keep in mind is to not erase any evidence of the incident from the system. Instead, the
material should be printed and reported to school officials if it happens during school hours or
to a parent or adult who can take it to higher authority.
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Further actions regarding reporting cyberbullying include but are not limited to printing
any evidence that is believed to be abuse or bullying. If it happens, it is recommended to ignore
or block any unwanted abuse in the form of cyberbullying. It is imperative to monitor and limit
children’s online time and the sites they visit frequently. Parents must not take any evidence or
concern brought up to them lightly and if the parent of the perpetrator is known, contact the
parents of that individual while also sharing the evidence. For more severe and continuing
harassment, law enforcement officials need to get involved while also providing emotional
support from a mental health professional to eliminate any negative thoughts and feelings
developed by the bullying.
The reality is that we are now in the year 2017 and cyberbullying is happening more
frequently than ever before. The time to act is now and as a minimum, schools need define
cyberbullying, stablish strong policies to prevent and eliminate harassment, train staff,
students, and parents to identify cyberbullying when they see it and set internet filtering
technologies to ensure enforcement of rules and regulations set in place. Cyberbullying is broad
and education plays a key role in finding a way to eliminate it from our society with hopes to
save the future of our children.
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Reference:
Feinberg, T. & Robey, N. (2008). Cyberbullying. Principal Leadership, 9(1), 10-14.
Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J.W. (2006). Bullies move beyond the schoolyard: A preliminary look at
cyberbullying. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 4(2), 148-169.
doi:10.1177/1541204006286288
Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J. (2009). Cyberbullying victimization. [Web]. Retrieved January 1, 2012,
from http://www.cyberbullying.us/2009_charts/cyberbullying_victim_2009.jpg
Notar, C. E., Padgett, S., & Roden, J. (2013). Cyberbullying: Resources for Intervention and
Prevention. Universal Journal Of Educational Research, 1(3), 133-145.
Smith, P.K., Smith, C., Osborn, R., & Samara, M. (2008). A content analysis of school anti-
bullying policies: Progress and limitations. Educational Psychology in Practice, 24(1), 1-
12. doi:10.1080/02667360701661165

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Running head: CYBER BULLYING 1 Cyber Bullying: An Intervention PSY610: Applied Social Psychology Running head: CYBER BULLYING 2 Cyber Bullying: An Intervention Bullying plays a large role in today’s society, particularly in school environments where students are still maturing and learning the difference between right and wrong behaviors. It is now 2017 and Cyber bullying is predominant to other forms of bullying because of the ability to reach so many, so far away with anonymity. The bullying process can take on a variety of forms, from verbal and emotional assaults to physical aggression, making it an extremely broad phenomenon to define. But do these negative actions have to remain a permanent stain on our society? Is there any way to get rid of its existence? This is where we start to mention an intervention and the need for one. Numerous research studies have taken place worldwide in attempts to minimize, with hopes to eliminate, the bullying phenomenon. But is there an actual need for intervention? Many people often fail to comprehend the severe necessity of interventions because bullying is often viewed as an inevitable activity that humans take part in. It is almost impossible to verify this inevitability but nonetheless, an intervention is very essential to preserve and maintain the well-being of society. Intervention and other anti-bullying methods are needed so that students may be let free from the stress, headaches and even psychosomatic disorders that bullying brings upon them. Furthermore, victims sometimes can be so traumatized that they stop attending school and other social gatherings altogether which hinders their educational and mental development. By promoting intervention from an early start, we are promoting and encouraging bystanders to be more involved in assisting a victim while also discouraging the bully. Intervention programs also serve as a direct medium to improve the ability of outsiders, especially adults, to provide the necessary detection of bullying and support to those victims. Running head: CYBER BULLYING 3 Cyberbullying is not necessarily a new type of bullying in terms of behavior, but it is a new platform the exudes similar behaviors. Cyberbullying involves nonphysical bullying and harassing behaviors such as “sending or posting harmful or cruel text or images using the internet or other digital communication devices such as cell phones” (Feinberg & Robey, 2008). Unlike normal bullying, cyberbullying is anonymous and can take place anywhere and has become a serious problem in recent years. Not only is the victim at risk but the one doing the bullying often has their own issues they are dealing with. A study by Notar, Padgett & Roden (2013) found students who experienced cyberbullying, both as a victim and an offender, had significantly lower self-esteem than those who had little or no experience with cyberbullying. The author goes on to point out that cyberbullying shows negative impacts on schooling, relationships, and the emotional and psychological health of younger victims, in some cases the impacts continue into early adulthood. Cyberbullying is not simply posting something mean online or on a social media page, there are different avenues. There is cyber harassment, which involves an adult. The adult can harass a child; the child harasses an adult or adult to adult, repeatedly sending mean, nasty and or insulting messages to the victim. Cyberstalking: repeatedly sending messages threatening in nature that are driven to instill fear to the victim. There are also exclusion/gossip groups, impersonation, outing, phishing, and even sexting just to name a few. Most cyberbullying among children and adolescents occurs between peers and occurs as early as second grade. A 2008 study by Smith, Smith, Osborn, and Samara found that adolescent female victims discovered the cyberbully was considered “someone they knew” 68% of the time. In 2006, Hinduja and Patchin conducted a study of middle school students, which Running head: CYBER BULLYING 4 revealed that more than 17% of students revealed they have been victims of cyberbullying at least once. Seventeen percent reported they cyberbullied others at least once. Furthermore, 12% reported they have been both a victim and an aggressor in cyberbullying situations (Hinduja & Patchin, 2009). Lastly, a 2006 study conducted by Fight Crime found that more than 13 million students aged 6-17 were victims of cyberbullying (Feinberg & Robey, 2008). With staggering numbers such as the ones mentioned above, it is clear to see the need for more programs that advocate prevention with hopes to eliminating it as a whole. Because of the negative impact cyberbullying has on children, schools must take immediate action to reduce incidents inside and outside of the school. When the school learns about incidents of cyberbullying, it first needs to be defined in order to develop a proper intervention and prevention program. Notar, Padgett and Roden (2013) suggest developing a map of locations where bullying is more likely to occur, to remind staff to remain vigilant for evidence of cyberbullying. Distribute a list of indicators that suggest victimization, provide support groups for students new to the school setting. To also remind staff that bullying may occur in the form of gay bashing, advice victims to respond appropriately, encourage bystanders to be friends to the victim and post a code of conduct in all classrooms. Schools often prohibit the use of cell phones, or any other form of electronics not directly connected to learning during business hours. When someone becomes the victim of cyber bullying, the one thing to keep in mind is to not erase any evidence of the incident from the system. Instead, the material should be printed and reported to school officials if it happens during school hours or to a parent or adult who can take it to higher authority. Running head: CYBER BULLYING 5 Further actions regarding reporting cyberbullying include but are not limited to printing any evidence that is believed to be abuse or bullying. If it happens, it is recommended to ignore or block any unwanted abuse in the form of cyberbullying. It is imperative to monitor and limit children’s online time and the sites they visit frequently. Parents must not take any evidence or concern brought up to them lightly and if the parent of the perpetrator is known, contact the parents of that individual while also sharing the evidence. For more severe and continuing harassment, law enforcement officials need to get involved while also providing emotional support from a mental health professional to eliminate any negative thoughts and feelings developed by the bullying. The reality is that we are now in the year 2017 and cyberbullying is happening more frequently than ever before. The time to act is now and as a minimum, schools need define cyberbullying, stablish strong policies to prevent and eliminate harassment, train staff, students, and parents to identify cyberbullying when they see it and set internet filtering technologies to ensure enforcement of rules and regulations set in place. Cyberbullying is broad and education plays a key role in finding a way to eliminate it from our society with hopes to save the future of our children. Running head: CYBER BULLYING 6 Reference: Feinberg, T. & Robey, N. (2008). Cyberbullying. Principal Leadership, 9(1), 10-14. Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J.W. (2006). Bullies move beyond the schoolyard: A preliminary look at cyberbullying. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 4(2), 148-169. doi:10.1177/1541204006286288 Hinduja, S. & Patchin, J. (2009). Cyberbullying victimization. [Web]. Retrieved January 1, 2012, from http://www.cyberbullying.us/2009_charts/cyberbullying_victim_2009.jpg Notar, C. E., Padgett, S., & Roden, J. (2013). Cyberbullying: Resources for Intervention and Prevention. Universal Journal Of Educational Research, 1(3), 133-145. Smith, P.K., Smith, C., Osborn, R., & Samara, M. (2008). A content analysis of school antibullying policies: Progress and limitations. Educational Psychology in Practice, 24(1), 112. doi:10.1080/02667360701661165 Name: Description: ...
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