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What is dna
The chemical compound DNA is made of is the double-strand template strand that contains
a base sequence and one RNA nucleoside. When this template strand comes into contact
with other RNA or DNA, they will get complementary nucleates for their genetic codes
inside them.
DNA was discovered by Max Planck when he used copper foil as an ink and noticed that it
changed color when exposed to heat in his laboratory. Then, Hans-Birkkeus developed the
first cell experiments in 1921, but it wasn't until 1958 there were actually cells isolated
with DNA. About 20 years later, two scientists at Rockefeller University named David Julius
Watson and Francis Crick discovered the structure and function of DNA, and the three men
published their research papers, including one titled “The Structure of DNA”, in Nature
Science in 1878. As with any new technology in the 19th century, some people were too
concerned about the technicalities of DNA and its structure, so they didn't pay much
attention to the scientific basis for it. However, over 100 years later, modern virologists
began working on ways to understand the structure of DNA and how it works, starting with
studying the structures of the viral proteins that are found inside it and looking through the
literature on the subject to see if there were any parallels between them and biological
DNA. In 1972, after almost 2 decades of work, Fred Sanger won the Nobel Prize for
discovering how genes were made, and since then, scientists have been coming up with
ways to do the same.
There's no denying that DNA has come a long way over the past few centuries and can now
help us better understand ourselves, but it isn't done without a bit of controversy, mainly
because of what it means for our health. On one hand, we can begin to study diseases like
cancer, which has helped lead to many great advances in science, medicine, and technology,
but also caused a lot of deaths due to it. There's also the issue of racial bias when it comes
to studies involving race in the gene editing industry and other fields of biology. All these
issues add up to make DNA controversial, but hopefully, this article gives you a little
something to think about it before you jump straight into learning more about how DNA
works.
In the beginning, DNA was considered only important for creating living things. It didn't
contain information passed down from parents to their children and children to their
descendants. With the discovery of penicillin and penicillin resistance, the search for
antibiotics got started, making the creation of the first vaccine possible. Since then,
however, scientists have discovered new organisms that use DNA as a building block for all
of their bodies and even humans. Most of these processes have gone unnoticed by the
majority, but some of the discoveries over the last 50 years haven't. We're still learning
how DNA is used to make our cells, so if you're not ready to dive right in, check out some of
the best books we've ever written. If your interested in getting more involved in biology,
here are some helpful resources that might interest you:
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Genetic code vs protein code. Genetic sequences represent a blueprint for the synthesis of
proteins. These are encoded on the DNA strand which acts by copying this sequence over
several times with each copy forming a different amino acid, or polypeptides, and adding
them to enzymes that make proteins. Each code is made of four nucleotides, A, T, C, G, but
it's also possible to encode additional amino acids from another source, called synthetic
polymers. Synthetic polymers are created by attaching DNA molecules to a metal ring
known as nucleoside phosphates. In most cases, genetic coding is easier to decode
compared to proteins because DNA codes don't have a fixed length and therefore it doesn't
need a complete set of instructions to be read. DNA sequences are stored in chromosomes
so DNA and proteins have very similar properties. They both have nitrogenous bases (A:T),
base pairs (A:C-3), adenine (C:G) pairs, and cytosines (A:T), methyl groups (C:C-3), and
deoxyribonucleic (A:T:C), pyrimidine (A:T-8), and thymine (C:T-2). In comparison, proteins
are usually quite larger in size and usually have multiple copies of the same protein, are
attached to a strong backbone that helps hold it together, and some of proteins are
polymeric proteins.
What is the role of DNA? To answer that question, let's refer to Figure 1. This diagram
shows the architecture of a typical DNA building block, which includes a double helix, a
nucleoside phosphate group, and a nucleoside. The nucleus contains DNA, which is
separated by the membrane from the cytoplasm and also contains DNA replicators and
transcription factors that control gene expression. Inside the nucleus, DNA replicates by
unwinding its double helix at regular intervals, causing nucleoside synthesis to occur on
the double helix and eventually make new strands of DNA. The DNA that we use to store
information about our genes is the DNA from our genes and the original purpose of making
the genome is to store it. The DNA from the nucleus is used to form a chain of
chromosomes and DNA replication, which occurs simultaneously and independently at the
same time. The next layer of DNA is the mitochondrion which stores energy that is required
in protein production. DNA can also produce proteins from other sources, such as non-
template genes, especially those that are called transposable elements and they are also
referred to as transgenic. Genes can be categorized based according to their functions in
the organism and this way they act out and regulate metabolism as well as growth,
development, reproduction, and death. A gene is called dominant if it produces the highest
amount of protein in the organism, otherwise known as the virulence phenotype. After
reading this article, it should be clear that DNA does indeed have a major part in our lives
and as we can see, some of the basic functions that DNA performs are essential in life on
Earth, but sometimes we need to remember that genetic information contains mistakes and
errors, and when it comes to genetics, there's always complications about it. For example, if
a person is born with two sets of alleles from two different genes, and one of the alleles is
recessive to the other, that person will never reproduce because this situation isn't meant
for reproduction. Although this happens less than 10% of the time, when it happens a
couple of mutations get created in the body and that can affect the phenotype of an
individual. This is why it is important we know more about genetics than we don't and be
prepared to handle the risks and changes it might bring in our daily lives.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

What is dna The chemical compound DNA is made of is the double-strand template strand that contains a base sequence and one RNA nucleoside. When this template strand comes into contact with other RNA or DNA, they will get complementary nucleates for their genetic codes inside them. DNA was discovered by Max Planck when he used copper foil as an ink and noticed that it changed color when exposed to heat in his laboratory. Then, Hans-Birkkeus developed the first cell experiments in 1921, but it wasn't until 1958 there were actually cells isolated with DNA. About 20 years later, two scientists at Rockefeller University named David Julius Watson and Francis Crick discovered the structure and function of DNA, and the three men published their research papers, including one titled “The Structure of DNA”, in Nature Science in 1878. As with any new technology in the 19th century, some people were too concerned about the technicalities of DNA and its structure, so they didn't pay much attention to the scientific basis for it. However, over 100 years later, modern virologists began working on ways to understand the structure of DNA and how it works, starting with studying the structures of the viral proteins that are found inside it and looking through the literature on the subject to see if there were any parallels between them and biological DNA. In 1972, after almost 2 decades of work, Fred Sanger won the Nobel Prize for discovering how genes were made, and since then, scientists have been coming up with ways to do the same. There's no denying that DNA has come a long way over the past few centuries and can now help us better understand ourselves, but it isn't done without a bit of controversy, mainly because of what it means for our health. On one hand, we can begin to study diseases like cancer, which has helped lead to many great advances in science, medicine, and technology, but also caused a lot of deaths due to it. There's also the issue of racial bias when it comes to studies involving race in the gene editing industry and other fields of biology. All these issues add up to make DNA controversial, but hopefully, this article gives you a little something to think about it before you jump straight into learning more about how DNA works. In the beginning, DNA was considered only important for creating living things. It didn't contain information passed down from parents to their children and children to their descendants. With the discovery of penicillin and penicillin resistance, the search for antibiotics got started, making the creation of the first vaccine possible. Since then, however, scientists have discovered new organisms that use DNA as a building block for all of their bodies and even humans. Most of these processes have gone unnoticed by the majority, but some of the discoveries over the last 50 years haven't. We're still learning how DNA is used to make our cells, so if you're not ready to dive right in, check out some of the best books we've ever written. If your interested in getting more involved in biology, here are some helpful resources that might interest you: Genetic code vs protein code. Genetic sequences represent a blueprint for the synthesis of proteins. These are encoded on the DNA strand which acts by copying this sequence over several times with each copy forming a different amino acid, or polypeptides, and adding them to enzymes that make proteins. Each code is made of four nucleotides, A, T, C, G, but it's also possible to encode additional amino acids from another source, called synthetic polymers. Synthetic polymers are created by attaching DNA molecules to a metal ring known as nucleoside phosphates. In most cases, genetic coding is easier to decode compared to proteins because DNA codes don't have a fixed length and therefore it doesn't need a complete set of instructions to be read. DNA sequences are stored in chromosomes so DNA and proteins have very similar properties. They both have nitrogenous bases (A:T), base pairs (A:C-3), adenine (C:G) pairs, and cytosines (A:T), methyl groups (C:C-3), and deoxyribonucleic (A:T:C), pyrimidine (A:T-8), and thymine (C:T-2). In comparison, proteins are usually quite larger in size and usually have multiple copies of the same protein, are attached to a strong backbone that helps hold it together, and some of proteins are polymeric proteins. What is the role of DNA? To answer that question, let's refer to Figure 1. This diagram shows the architecture of a typical DNA building block, which includes a double helix, a nucleoside phosphate group, and a nucleoside. The nucleus contains DNA, which is separated by the membrane from the cytoplasm and also contains DNA replicators and transcription factors that control gene expression. Inside the nucleus, DNA replicates by unwinding its double helix at regular intervals, causing nucleoside synthesis to occur on the double helix and eventually make new strands of DNA. The DNA that we use to store information about our genes is the DNA from our genes and the original purpose of making the genome is to store it. The DNA from the nucleus is used to form a chain of chromosomes and DNA replication, which occurs simultaneously and independently at the same time. The next layer of DNA is the mitochondrion which stores energy that is required in protein production. DNA can also produce proteins from other sources, such as nontemplate genes, especially those that are called transposable elements and they are also referred to as transgenic. Genes can be categorized based according to their functions in the organism and this way they act out and regulate metabolism as well as growth, development, reproduction, and death. A gene is called dominant if it produces the highest amount of protein in the organism, otherwise known as the virulence phenotype. After reading this article, it should be clear that DNA does indeed have a major part in our lives and as we can see, some of the basic functions that DNA performs are essential in life on Earth, but sometimes we need to remember that genetic information contains mistakes and errors, and when it comes to genetics, there's always complications about it. For example, if a person is born with two sets of alleles from two different genes, and one of the alleles is recessive to the other, that person will never reproduce because this situation isn't meant for reproduction. Although this happens less than 10% of the time, when it happens a couple of mutations get created in the body and that can affect the phenotype of an individual. This is why it is important we know more about genetics than we don't and be prepared to handle the risks and changes it might bring in our daily lives. Name: Description: ...
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