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Get up, Stand Up: Pop and Protest
Regardless of the country, one comes from or many music villages around the world, pop
music has always had a strong foothold, so long as it is, despite other popular music such as
dustup, dance, electronic, Jazz etc. developed like a storm. Get up, stand up is a song co-written
by Bob Marley and Peter Tosh. The chorus of the song ("Stand up for your rights ... / Don't give
up the war") sounds like a political song that Amnesty International still uses in rallies. But the
lyrics originate from Rastafari theology, about not being peaceful by the promise of the next life.
(Rastafari is a popular religion in Jamaica, an island nation in the Caribbean, often considered
Central America. Bob Marley, the composer and performer of this song, is Jamaican and follows
Rastafari.) Song performed by Bob Marley and the Wailers in 1975 ranked No. 302 on the list of
500 Best Songs of all Rolling Stone era.
These words, "I am a life lover, before this war," were the first words of the Return to
Cookie Mountain, one of the most successful albums of 2006, broadcast on television.
Regardless of what that song means, it also shows the trend of world pop music in the past year.
Hiding behind melodious and lyrical melodies, the composers have been "declaring war" with
the war - a factor that shattered all dreams and romance in this world. The September 11, 2001
event in the US and the war in Iraq are probably the two topics most chosen by musicians. Anger
and fear of war are natural feelings for listeners through songs. In 2003, Dixie Chick's career was

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staggered when Natalie Maines was more or less critical of the President (US) of the essence of
the Iraq war. Many songs have lashed out in the oil business and weapons such as Billy Bragg's
The Price of Oil. Many other musicians such as Merle Haggard, Nellie McKay and Anti-flag
rock groups joined the war. Next is the rappers - those who are not afraid of the "corners" of life,
ready to put their meaning into the song to tell the truth. They also soon picked up a hot topic,
Iraq. Among these singers, Eminem and Outkast have publicly criticized the US President and
the meaningless Iraq war. It can be seen, 2006 is the year when musicians always use their works
as a tool to attack the war. "New year comes, new enemies appear. The soldiers return to the
battlefield”. These are the lyrics that John Legend sang in Coming home, the last song of his
2006 album. The song is about a letter written to a soldier's family, he worries whether his
girlfriend is safe. "The war seems to never end, but we will reunite again." The cries of the
Legend seem to carry more aspirations than assertiveness and confidence.
Mayer opened the album Continuum (2006) with the lyrical ballad waiting on the world
change. The song shows the helplessness and hopelessness of people of the same generation
Mayer. They need help to eliminate the war. If we have the power to bring war away from our
neighbors / They will no longer have the unfinished Christmas holidays, no tapes on the door.
And the best way they can do is waiting until "our generation establishes a new order." But
perhaps the anger is most evident in Pearl Jam's guitar albums. With the image of a dead soldier
in the World Wide Suicide, the music was frankly sarcastic, defaming the President. In Army
Reserve, the song has a saying: She told herself and everyone that / Her father is trading for our
freedom. Vehemently protesting previous songs are now replaced by a sad and tired tone. In
Chicago Wind, Merle Haggard sang as if pleading: Let's get out of Iraq, don't go up to that crash

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Surname 1 Student Name Institution Course Instructor Date Get up, Stand Up: Pop and Protest Regardless of the country, one comes from or many music villages around the world, pop music has always had a strong foothold, so long as it is, despite other popular music such as dustup, dance, electronic, Jazz etc. developed like a storm. Get up, stand up is a song co-written by Bob Marley and Peter Tosh. The chorus of the song ("Stand up for your rights ... / Don't give up the war") sounds like a political song that Amnesty International still uses in rallies. But the lyrics originate from Rastafari theology, about not being peaceful by the promise of the next life. (Rastafari is a popular religion in Jamaica, an island nation in the Caribbean, often considered Central America. Bob Marley, the composer and performer of this song, is Jamaican and follows Rastafari.) Song performed by Bob Marley and the Wailers in 1975 ranked No. 302 on the list of 500 Best Songs of all Rolling Stone era. These words, "I am a life lover, before this war," were the first words of the Return to Cookie Mountain, one of the most successful albums of 2006, broadcast on television. Regardless of what that song means, it also shows the trend of world pop music in the past year. Hiding behind melodious and lyrical melodies, the composers have been "declaring war" with the war - a factor that shattered all dreams and romance in this world. The September 11, 2001 event in the US and the war in Iraq are probabl ...
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