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HMGT 300 Week 6 Quiz


Question
1 (4 points)
 
According to the National Institute
for Health Care Management: Understanding U.S. Health Care Spending article,
which of the following are correlated with the rising obesity rates in the
U.S.? (Select all that apply)
Question 1 options:






Increase in other chronic health
conditions








Increase in the determinants of
health








Increase in health spending








Decrease in provider visits


Question 2 (4 points)
 
As of 2009, national health
expenditures in the U.S. were approximately what percentage of the Gross
Domestic Product?
Question 2 options:






14.9%








16.0%








17.6%








19.2%


Question 3 (4 points)
 
According to figures from the
National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA), how much was spent on health care
in the U.S. in 2009?
Question 3 options:






$1.25 trillion








$2.5 trillion








$3.75 trillion








$5.0 trillion


Question 4 (4 points)
 
Which of the following have
contributed to the increases in the cost of health care? (select all that
apply)
Question 4 options:






New medical technology








Growing rates of obesity








Perverse provider reimbursement
mechanisms (i.e. fee-for-service)








Expanded insurance coverage








The practice of defensive medicine


Question 5 (4 points)
 
Comorbidities require less
sophisticated coordination of care.
Question 5 options:






True








False


Question 6 (4 points)
 
According to "Crossing the
Quality Chasm," redesigning the healthcare system involves which of the
following:
Question 6 options:






Evidence-based care








Effective use of information
technology








Paying higher salaries to
clinicians








All of the above








None of the above








Both a and b


Question 7 (4 points)
 
The Institute of Medicine Committee
specified a blueprint for a health care delivery systems in the 21st century
that will result in an ideal system if followed.
Question 7 options:






True








False


Question 8 (4 points)
 
According to the Institute of
Medicine, Coverage Matters: Insurance and Health Care article, historically,
some of the factors that influenced whether someone was uninsured included:
Question 8 options:






Gender








Ethnicity








Marriage status








All of the above








None of the above








Both a and b


Question 9 (4 points)
 
Historically, most of the uninsured
in the U.S. have been illegal immigrants.
Question 9 options:






True








False


Question 10 (4 points)
 
Medicaid fills in the gaps in the
availability of health insurance by:
Question 10 options:






Covering all people below the
poverty line








Covering just low-income children








Covering certain groups of
low-income people








All of the above


Question 11 (4 points)
 
According to the Kaiser Family
Foundation, which group accounts for the most Medicaid spending?
Question 11 options:






Children under the age of 19








Unemployed adults








Elderly and disabled adults








Dual-eligibles over the age of 65


Question 12 (4 points)
 
Meaningful Use sets the specific
objectives that eligible professionals and hospitals must achieve to
participate in the EHR Incentive Programs.
Question 12 options:






True








False


Question 13 (4 points)
 
Providers who prove compliant with
meaningful use regulations will receive what tangible benefit?
Question 13 options:






A meaningful use compliance
certification








Decreased government regulation








Government incentive payments








Acceptance onto the stage 3 rules
committee


Question 14 (4 points)
 
In comparison to the general
population, patients receiving Long-Term and Post-Acute Care services
typically:
Question 14 options:






Have a smaller range of conditions








Have less complex conditions








Have a wider range of conditions
that are more complex








Have less complex conditions that
are wider in range


Question 15 (4 points)
 
According to the Long-Term and
Post-Acute Care (LTPAC) Roundtable Summary Report of Findings (Anderson), what
are the two ways to capture data discussed in the article?
Question 15 options:






ERH and HIE








EHR and IHE








HER and HEI








EHR and HIE


Question 16 (4 points)
 
The article "Adoption of
Electronic Health Records in the United States" stated that there are
eight barriers to adoption of Electronic Health Records. Specifically, the
article mentions the barrier of "Time" and stated that productivity
is initially reduced when caregivers start using the EHR's. This is due to:
Question 16 options:






The Lack Curve








The Learning Curve








The Boonstra Effect








The Interconnect Effect


Question 17 (4 points)
 
The article "Adoption of
Electronic Health Records in the United States" discusses government
incentives related to reform to adopt information technology in meaningful
ways. The ____________ Act includes spending to create a network of Electronic
Health Records.
Question 17 options:






HIPAA








HITECH








TECH-Health








Health Outcomes


Question 18 (4 points)
 
The article "Adoption of
Electronic Health Records in the United States" stated that in order to be
considered multifunctional, Electronic Health Records need to have at least two
of the following capabilities:
Question 18 options:






Generation of patient information,
generation of patience, order exit management, decision support








Generation of patient registry,
generation of healthy outcomes, order entry management and character support








Generation of patient information,
generation of patient registry and panel information, order entry management
and decision support








Generation of patient information,
generation of registry and panel information, order entry management and
healthy outcomes


Question 19 (4 points)
 
The Chief Medical Information
Officer is a physician who bridges the process of information management and
medical practice. This position is usually seen as:
Question 19 options:






More administrative than clinical








Equally administrative and
clinical








More clinical than administrative








All clinical and no administrative
responsibilities--it's a symbolic position


Question 20 (4 points)
 
The initiation of the electronic
medical record is a new strategy in today's healthcare environment but actually
began as far back as:
Question 20 options:






1970's








1990's








1960's








2009


Question 21 (4 points)
 
As described in the Health Affairs
article, "Strategic Action in Health Information Technology: Why the
Obvious has Taken So Long," we have come a long way in healthcare IT over
the past thirty-five years. However, observers have expressed repeated concerns
since it's inception. Of those concerns the most prevalent is:
Question 21 options:






The amount of data being collected








The effects on the
physician/patient relationship








The accuracy of the patient data
being collected








The ability to train users to be
proficient in data management


Question 22 (4 points)
 
The National Committee on Vital and
Health Statistics (NCVHS) was established by Congress more than fifty years ago
to serve as a public advisory body to HHS on health data, statistics, and
national health information policy. They have been extremely influential over
the years in establishing standards for health data, health data systems and
patient record systems. One of the most important and influential pieces of
legislation the NCVHS developed is:
Question 22 options:






The Affordable Care Act








The Social Security Act








Health Insurance Portability and
Accountability Act








None of the above


Question 23 (4 points)
 
States have the flexibility to
design their own Medicaid programs within federal guidelines.
Question 23 options:






True








False

Rating:
forum Q&A

Identifying an Acceptable Paraphrase (MLA Style) - Quiz 10 question


Question 1 (1 point) 
[Ed: error here relates to close wording]
The
original vision of charter schools in 1988, when the idea was
popularized, was that they would be created by venturesome public school
teachers who would seek out the most alienated students, those who had
dropped out or those who were likely to do so. The teachers in these
experimental schools would find better ways to reach these students and
bring what they'd learned back to the regular public school. The
fundamental idea at the beginning of the movement was that charter
schools would help public schools and enroll students who needed extra
attention and new strategies.
From Ravitch, Diane. "Why I Changed My Mind." The Nation 14 June 2010: 20-24. Print. The passage appears on page 22 of the article.
Question 1 options: A or B
ARavitch
notes that the original vision for charter schools gave support to the
work of public schools by helping some of the most alienated students
who would benefit from extra attention and new strategies (22).
B
Ravitch
notes that originally charter schools were supposed to reach at-risk
students with better strategies and creative teachers. These teachers
would then also find ways to share these innovations with more
traditional public schools (22).

Question 2 (1 point)
 
[sentence structure too close]
Paul
Revere's ride is perhaps the most famous historical example of a
word-of-mouth epidemic. A piece of extraordinary news traveled a long
distance in a very short time, mobilizing an entire region to arms. Not
all word-of-mouth epidemics are this sensational, of course. But it is
safe to say that word of mouth is—even in this age of mass
communications and multimillion-dollar advertising campaigns—still the
most important form of human communication.
From Gladwell, Malcolm. The Tipping Point. New York: Little, Brown, 2002. Print. The passage appears on page 32.
Question 2 options: A or B

APaul
Revere's well-known ride is the best example in history of a
word-of-mouth epidemic. His piece of important information covered a
long distance in no time, preparing large numbers of neighbors for
battle. However, Gladwell states, not every word-of-mouth epidemic is
this significant. Yet even given our era of mass media and
advertisements, word of mouth is "the most important form of human
communication" (32).
B
According
to Gladwell, the best known example from history of a word-of-mouth
epidemic may be Paul Revere's ride. His news covered great distances,
quickly preparing his neighbors for battle. Not every word-of-mouth
epidemic is this significant. But even in our era of mass media, word of
mouth is "the most important form of human communication" (32).

Question 3 (1 point) 
[wording too close, citation missing]
Scientists
say juggling e-mail, phone calls and other incoming information can
change how people think and behave. They say our ability to focus is
being undermined by bursts of information. These play to a primitive
impulse to respond to immediate opportunities and threats. The
stimulation provokes excitement — a dopamine squirt — that researchers
say can be addictive. In its absence, people feel bored.
From Richtel, Matt. "Hooked on Gadgets, and Paying a Mental Price." New York Times. New York Times,7 June 2010. Web. The article was accessed online, in a version that appeared without page numbers.
Question 3 options: A or B
AResearch
shows that juggling messages, calls, and other information can affect
our behavior. These bursts of information are changing our ability to
focus by working on our primitive need to respond to immediate
opportunities. Later, without these stimuli, we become bored (Richtel).
B
Researchers
explain that we erode our ability to focus when we expose ourselves to
constant e-mail, messages, and other bits of information. These stimuli
excite the brain but can become addictive so that when the stimuli are
removed we become bored (Richtel).

Question 4 (1 point) 
[cover same points in same order]
Assange
also wanted to insure that, once the video was posted online, it would
be impossible to remove. He told me that WikiLeaks maintains its content
on more than twenty servers around the world and on hundreds of domain
names. (Expenses are paid by donations, and a few independent
well-wishers also run "mirror sites" in support.) Assange calls the site
"an uncensorable system for untraceable mass document leaking and
public analysis," and a government or company that wanted to remove
content from WikiLeaks would have to practically dismantle the Internet
itself.
From Khatchadourian, Raffi. "No Secrets: Julian Assange's Mission for Total Transparency." New Yorker. TheNew Yorker,7 June 2010. Web. The article was reprinted without page numbers online.
Question 4 options: A or B
AAssange
makes sure that videos on WikiLeaks cannot be deleted, using multiple
servers and back-up sites in locations around the world. His goal is to
make WikiLeaks documents impossible to trace or censor and to make the
system impossible to dismantle (Khatchadourian).
B
Assange's
goal is for documents leaked on WikiLeaks to be impossible for
governments or companies to trace or censor. The WikiLeaks content is
maintained on multiple servers and back-up sites in locations around the
world (Khatchadourian).

Question 5 (1 point) 
[sentence structure]
Bear
Stearns and Lehman Brothers in 2008 more closely resembled normal
corporations with solid, Middle American values than did any Wall Street
firm circa 1985. The changes were camouflage. They helped to distract
outsiders from the truly profane event: the growing misalignment of
interests between the people who trafficked in financial risk and the
wider culture. The surface rippled, but down below, in the depths, the
bonus pool remained undisturbed.
From Lewis, Michael. The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine. New York: Norton, 2010. Print. The passage appears on page 254.
Question 5 options: A or B
ALewis
explains that changes to Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers by 2008 made
them appear more like typical American companies. These new values were
not deeply held. They enabled these Wall Street firms to mask their
deeper interests. There appeared to be change, but below the surface,
the culture of big bonuses was not touched (254).
B
By
2008, changes made Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers appear to have
values more like those of typical American companies. These values were
only superficially held, Lewis explains, to mask risk from outsiders. In
reality, the culture of big bonuses at these firms was unchanged (254).

Question 6 (1 point) 
[missing citation/signal phrase]
Unlike
the staggered luncheon sessions I observed at Walton High, lunch was
served in a single sitting to the students in this school. "It's
physically impossible to feed 3,300 kids at once," the teacher said.
"The line for kids to get their food is very long and the entire period
lasts only 30 minutes. It takes them 15 minutes just to walk there from
their classes and get through the line. They get 10 minutes probably to
eat their meals. A lot of them don't try. You've been a teacher, so you
can imagine what it does to students when they have no food to eat for
an entire day. The schoolday here at Fremont is eight hours long."
From Kozol, Jonathan. The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. New York: Crown, 2005. Print. The passage appears on page 176.
Question 6 options: A or B
AKozol
observes the strain on Fremont's students at lunchtime, where all of
the 3,300 students in attendance are served in one 30-minute meal
period. One teacher calculates that the extended the walk to the
cafeteria and long food lines create a 10-minute window for students to
eat. What often results is that many students go all day without a meal
(176).
B
There
is obvious strain on Fremont's students at lunchtime, where all of the
3,300 students in attendance are served in one 30-minute meal period.
One teacher calculates that the extended the walk to the cafeteria and
long food lines create a 10-minute window for students to eat. What
often results is that many students go all day without a meal.

Question 7 (1 point) 
[wording too close]
Because
of physiological and behavioral differences, exposures among children
are expected to be different from exposures among adults. Children may
be more exposed to some environmental contaminants, because they consume
more of certain foods and water per unit of body weight and have a
higher ratio of body surface area to volume than adults. Equally
important, rapid changes in behavior and physiology may lead to
differences in exposure as a child grows up.
From United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook (Final Report). Sept. 2008. Web. 5 November 2009. The passage appears on page 1-1.
Question 7 options: A or B
AIn
its handbook, the United States Environmental Protection Agency sets
out factors for assessing children's exposure to various contaminants
and pollutants. Children are more vulnerable to chemicals than adults
because they consume more food and water as a proportion of their body
weight. Children's exposure to environmental pollutants through their
body surface area may be significantly higher than that for adults. And
as children grow and behaviors change, their exposure also changes
(1-1).
B
In
its handbook, the United States Environmental Protection Agency sets
out factors for assessing children's exposure to various contaminants
and pollutants. Children may be more exposed to some chemicals than
adults because they consume more food and water as a proportion of their
body weight. A child's exposure to environmental chemicals through
their body surface area may be significantly higher than that for
adults. As important, changes in behavior and children's bodies mean
different exposures (1-1).

Question 8 (1 point) 
[sentence structure]
Thomas
Jefferson had made it unmistakably clear to Lewis and Clark that their
foremost objective was to find "the direct water communication from sea
to sea formed by the bed of the Missouri & perhaps the Oregon." But
in his detailed letter of instructions to Lewis, Jefferson devoted more
words to the Indian nations than to any other topic. Not only was
Jefferson intensely curious about the tribes, he wanted Lewis and Clark
to wean their loyalties away from the despised British traders and
enfold them into the orbit of American trade and commerce.
From Jones, Landon Y. William Clark and the Shaping of the West. New York: Hill-Farrar, 2004. The passage appears on pages 130-31.
Question 8 options: A or B
AThomas
Jefferson's instructions to Lewis and Clark laid out their main goal
which was to find a water route west to the Pacific Ocean. Jefferson's
letter, however, also made clear his great interest in the Indian
nations they would meet and his secondary objective: Lewis and Clark
should work to persuade Indian nations to trade with Americans and not
the British (Jones, 130-31).
B
Thomas
Jefferson clearly explains in his instructions that Lewis and Clark are
to find a direct water route to the west coast. But he also goes on at
length about Indian nations in the letter. Not only did Jefferson want
to find out more about the tribes, he was eager for Lewis and Clark to
persuade Indian traders to abandon ties with the hated British and bring
them into the sphere of American traders (Jones, 130-31).

Question 9 (1 point) 
[order is not the same as in the original, also wording]
Yoko
became the epitome of Fluxus multimedia antiart. Her works tended to be
sculpture, or rather three-dimensional collage, assembled from
quotidian objects and usually inviting physical contact with the
observer. Sometimes the creation would be a piece of theatre, with the
role of the artwork played by the artist and the audience's reactions
serving to illuminate some truth about the nature of art or the human
condition in general.
From Norman, Phillip. John Lennon: The Life. New York: Random, 2009. Print. The excerpt is from page 474.
Question 9 options: A or B
AYoko
Ono's multimedia antiart, as Norman describes it, illuminated truths
about the human condition with Ono herself playing the role of the
artwork. Some pieces were sculpture made up of assembled objects, while
other pieces were like theater pieces that involved human contact (474).
B
Yoko
Ono's multimedia art, as Norman describes it, included sculptures made
out of everyday objects while often encouraging the viewer to come into
contact with the art. Her work, particularly the pieces that were like
theater, challenged viewers to react and to think about the definition
of art (474).

Question 10 (1 point) 
[wording; wrong citation]
Some
recent studies have explored the existence of behavior in toddlers that
is "altruistic" in an even stronger sense — like when they give up
their time and energy to help a stranger accomplish a difficult task.
The psychologists Felix Warneken and Michael Tomasello have put toddlers
in situations in which an adult is struggling to get something done,
like opening a cabinet door with his hands full or trying to get to an
object out of reach. The toddlers tend to spontaneously help, even
without any prompting, encouragement or reward.
From Bloom, Paul. "The Moral Life of Babies." New York Times Magazine. New York Times,9 May 2010. Web. The passage appears on page 47.
Question 10 options: A or B
ANew
studies reveal that toddlers engage in altruistic behavior. Bloom
reports on experiments where toddlers came to the aid of a stranger
struggling with a physical task, without external prompts (47).
B
New
studies reveal altruistic behavior in toddlers who are observed giving
help to strangers working on a difficult task. For example, without
encouragement or reward toddlers spontaneously offer help to an adult
struggling to complete a difficult task like getting an object that is
out of reach (Warneken and Tomasello 47).

Rating:
forum Q&A

MLA Works Cited - Quiz 10 question





Question 1 (1 point) 
The student is quoting from "Surveillance: Taking It Downtown" by Brennan David published on March 28, 2010 in the Columbia Daily Tribune. The student accessed the article on the Web on June 9, 2010.
Question 1 options: a or b
aDavid, Brennan. "Surveillance: Taking It Downtown." Columbia Daily Tribune. Columbia Daily Tribune, 28 Mar. 2010. Web. 9 June 2010.
b
David, Brennan. "Surveillance: Taking It Downtown." Columbia Daily Tribune. 28 Mar. 2010. 9 June 2010.

Question 2 (1 point) 
The student is paraphrasing page 265 of Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood, by Mark Harris. The book was published in New York by Penguin Press, in 2008.
Question 2 options: a or b
aHarris, Mark. Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood. New York: Penguin, 2008. Print.
b
Harris, Mark. Pictures at a Revolution. Penguin: New York, 2008. Print.

Question 3 (1 point) 
The student is citing a book, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things,
by William McDonough and Michael Brungart. It was published in New York
by North Point Press, an imprint of Farrar, Straus, and Giroux in 2002.
Question 3 options: a or b
aMcDonough, William and Brungart, Michael. Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. New York: North Point-Farrar, 2002. Print.
b
McDonough, William and Michael Brungart. Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. New York: North Point-Farrar, 2002. Print.

Question 4 (1 point) 
The student is paraphrasing a book, Queen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and the New Realities of Girl World, by Rosalind Wiseman.
Question 4 options: a or b
aWiseman, Rosalind. Queen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and the New Realities of Girl World. New York: Crown, 2009. Print.
b
Wiseman, Rosalind. Queen Bees and Wannabes: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip, Boyfriends, and the New Realities of Girl World. 2nd ed. New York: Three Rivers-Crown, 2009. Print.

Question 5 (1 point) 
The student is citing "The Enhancement of the Senses," a review of a book, The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science that appeared in the magazine The Nation.
Question 5 options: a or b
aFindlen, Paula. "The Enhancement of the Senses." Rev. of The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science, by Richard Holmes. Nation 31 May 2010: 33-36. Print.
b
Findlen, Paula. "The Enhancement of the Senses." Nation 31 May 2010: 33-36. Print.

Question 6 (1 point) 
For
an essay about women in 1960s American film, the student is citing the
performances of George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn and the work of the
director Blake Edwards in Breakfast at Tiffany's. The film was released in 1961 and distributed on DVD in the Paramount Centennial Collection in 2009.
Question 6 options: a or b
aBreakfast at Tiffany's. Dir. Blake Edwards. Perf. Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard. Paramount, 1961. Film.
b
Breakfast at Tiffany's. Dir. Blake Edwards. Perf. Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard. 1961. Paramount, 2009. DVD.

Question 7 (1 point) 
The student is quoting from an unsigned editorial, "Asserting Silence" published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on June 4, 2010.
Question 7 options: a or b
aAnonymous. "Asserting Silence." Editorial. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 4 June 2010: A16. Print.
b
"Asserting Silence." Editorial. St. Louis Post-Dispatch 4 June 2010: A16. Print.

Question 8 (1 point) 
The
student is summarizing an article, "What Does the Millennial Generation
Want from a Mobile Phone?" by Stephanie Camp that appeared online in The Huffington Post on June 9, 2010. The student accessed the article on June 17, 2010.
Question 8 options: a or b
aCamp, Stephanie. "What Does the Millennial Generation Want from a Mobile Phone?" Huffington Post. HuffingtonPost.com, 9 June 2010. Web. 17 June 2010.
b
Camp, Stephanie. "What Does the Millennial Generation Want from a Mobile Phone?" Huffington Post. HuffingtonPost.com, 9 June 2010. Web.

Question 9 (1 point) 
The student is citing two books by Lawrence Lessig. One is Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy, published in New York by Penguin Press in 2008. The other is Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity, also published in New York by Penguin, in 2004.
Question 9 options: a or b
aLessig, Lawrence. Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity. New York: Penguin, 2004. Print.
Lessig, Lawrence. Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy. New York: Penguin, 2008. Print.
b
Lessig, Lawrence. Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity. New York: Penguin, 2004. Print.
---. Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy. New York: Penguin, 2008. Print.

Question 10 (1 point) 
The student is quoting from a film review of The Secret in Their Eyes, published April 16, 2010,accessed online on May 3, 2010 from the Los Angeles Times.
Question 10 options: a or b
aSharkey, Betsy. "Untangling the Past." Rev. of The Secret in Their Eyes, dir. Juan Jose Campanella. Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles Times16 Apr. 2010. Web. 3 May 2010.
b
Sharkey, Betsy. "Untangling the Past." Los Angeles Times 16 Apr. 2010. Web.

Rating:
forum Q&A

Childhood Anxiety/ Ashford Univ EDU644


Hourigan, Settipani, Southam-Gerow, & Kendall (2012) explain, “Childhood anxiety disorders are among the most common childhood disorders” (p.104).  Review the case example of Evan in Chapter 7 and based on Evan’s Fear Ladder, what plans would you make to involve Evan’s teachers.  What strategies could be used in an educational setting to help Evan overcome his disorder?  What instructional or classroom management practices might the teacher need to modify to accommodate Evan’s need?  
Tutorial can be at least one to two paragraphs....Thanks

Rating:
forum Q&A

Appropriate Quotation (MLA Style) - Quiz 10 quetion


Question 1 (1 point) [Original:]
Most editors test their covers in focus groups in an endless search for
the magic that will make their magazines fly off the shelves and to
avoid costly mistakes. Katharine Q. SeelyeQuestion 1 options: a or b
aSeelye argues that magazine editors are seeking the magic that will make their magazines fly off the shelves (604).b
Seelye argues that editors the magic that will make their magazines fly off the shelves (604).
Question 2 (1 point) [Original:] To be very clear, then, I am not criticizing the work of Habitat for Humanity. –Diana GeorgeQuestion 2 options: a or b
aAlthough
their advertisements are the subject of her analysis, George is careful
to state "I am not criticizing the work of Habitat for Humanity" (623).b
Although
their advertisements are the subject of her analysis, George's
statement that "I am not criticizing the work of Habitat for Humanity"
(623).
Question 3 (1 point) [Original:]
Anecdotally, adolescent vegetarianism seems to be rising, thanks in
part to YouTube animal slaughter videos that shock the developing
sensibilities of many U.S. children. But there isn't enough long-term
data to prove that, according to government researchers. –Mike StobbeQuestion 3 options:  or b
aIncreasingly
adolescents are becoming vegetarian, thanks to "YouTube animal
slaughter videos that shock the developing sensibilities of many U.S.
children" (Stobbe 649).b
If
more adolescents are becoming vegetarian, it may be related to "YouTube
animal slaughter videos that shock the developing sensibilities of many
U.S. children" (Stobbe 649).
Question 4 (1 point) [Original:]
Regressive changes in governmental tax policies the weakening of labor
unions over the last quarter century have led to a significant rise in
the level of inequality between the rich and the middle class. –Gregory
MantsiosQuestion 4 options: a or b
aMantsios
counters that "Regressive changes in governmental tax policies" and
loss of influence for organized labor "have led to a significant rise in
the level of inequality between the rich and the middle class" (701).b
Mantsios
counters that "regressive changes" tax policy along with a loss of
influence for organized labor helped create a "significant rise in the
level of inequality" between wealthy and middle-income Americans (701).
Question 5 (1 point) [Original:] Grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it. –Joan DidionQuestion 5 options: a or b
aDidion's suggestion that "grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it" (929).b
Didion suggests that "grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it" (929).
Question 6 (1 point) [Original:]
Following a rule of good manners may mean doing something you do not
want to do, and the weird rhetoric of our self-indulgent age resists the
idea that we have such things as obligations to others. –Stephen L.
CarterQuestion 6 options: a or b
aDescribing
a decline in the behavior of young people, Stephen L. Carter worries
that "the weird rhetoric of [this] self-indulgent age resists the idea"
of self-control and good manners (672).b
Describing
a decline in the behavior of young people, Stephen L. Carter worries
that "the weird rhetoric of a self-indulgent age resists the idea that
we should have" self-control and good manners (672).
Question 7 (1 point) [Original:] Already he thinks of himself as someone who will give away what he has to those in need. –Jay PariniQuestion 7 options: a or b
aParini
says of Warren Buffett that "Already he thinks of himself as someone
who will give away what he has to those in need" (938).b
Parini
says of Warren Buffett that "already he thinks of himself as someone
who will give away what he has to those in need" (938).
Question 8 (1 point) [Original] I haven't found a soul who tried this machine who wasn't appalled, baffled, or both. –David PogueQuestion 8 options: a or b
aWhen
evaluating the BlackBerry, Pogue complains "I haven't found a soul who
tried this machine who wasn't appalled, baffled or both" (D7).b
When
evaluating the BlackBerry, Pogue complains, "he hasn't found a soul who
tried this machine who wasn't appalled, baffled or both" (D7).
Question 9 (1 point) [Original:]
Do temperamentally violent kids seek out shows that express feelings
they already have, or are they in it for the adrenaline boost? –Maggie
CutlerQuestion 9 options: a or b
a"Do temperamentally violent kids seek out shows that express feelings they already have?" Cutler asks (64).b
"Do temperamentally violent kids seek out shows that express feelings they already have" Cutler asks (64)?
Question 10 (1 point) [Original:]
The Internet has turned teenagers into honest documentarians of their
own lives—reporters embedded in their homes, their schools, their own
heads. But this is also why it's dangerous, why we can't seem to
recognize that it's just a medium. We're afraid. Our kids know things we
don't. –Amy GoldwasserQuestion 10 options: a or b
A
According
to Goldwasser, the cause for fear is that "Internet access has turned
teenagers into honest documentarians of their own lives. . . . Our kids
know things we don't" (667).
B
According
to Goldwasser, the cause for fear is that Internet access "has turned
teenagers into honest documentarians of their own lives. . . Our kids
know things we don't" (667).

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Need help with some Discussions about cultural issues that may impact on you as an ICT professional


Question 1
Describe and discuss what cultural issues may impact on you as an ICT professional if your organisation merges with another. Try to think deeply about some of the possible impacts on you and your career path that could result from an organisation merger or restructure.
Write 100-200 words in answer to this.Question 2
From your readings this week, especially in Part 3 of this week's seminar, which framework are you going to use to analyse the scenarios in Assignment 1? Choose either MacDonald or White. Provide reasons to support why have you chosen this one.
Write 100-200 words to explain your choice. There is no need for discussion with your classmates of this question.Question 3
You are faced with a situation you feel may be unethical. How would you set about analysing the situation? Think carefully about the ethical analysis process, not the potential ethical dilemma. That is to say, try not to get caught up in developing and describing a scenario that is unethical. Rather, your focus is on the procedural aspect of dealing with a situation you feel may be unethical.
What questions do you need to ask yourself to determine whether this is an unethical situation? What facts or data do you need to consider and why? What, or who – might help you in your analysis? Use the Ethical Framework provided by White's 3-step method to frame your responses to Question 3.
Write 150-250 words, to answer this question.
If you wish, choose a specific example of an unethical situation; either fictional, or that you have actually experienced.Discuss with your classmates the different approaches you each have taken and try to explain why there are differences, but once again, try not to get caught up in describing every detail of the situation but instead get to the heart of what makes it unethical, unprofessional or possibly risky in the context of the professional workplace.Question 4
Where you are working in your internship, locate your company's Values statement or Code of Ethics, and ask your supervisor if you can either link to it from the company website in the discussion forum or reproduce it in the forum. If your supervisor refuses permission, or there is no Values statement or Code of Ethics, prepare one for their use based on the reading you have done. You might model it on one you have come across. If you need, look at theWestern Australia Public Sector Code of Ethics as a guide.
Write 100-200 words to evaluate the code of ethics or values statement, whichever you are working with, against this week’s readings. Discuss what is good about it, what might be missing and how it could be improved.

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Potential and Kinetic Energy - SCI103 Phase 5 Lab Report


Assignment: SCI103
Phase 5 Lab Report
TITLE: Potential
and Kinetic Energy
INSTRUCTIONS:
Enter the Virtual Lab and conduct the experiments provided. Please type your
answers on this form. When your lab report is complete, submit it to the
Submitted Assignments area of the Virtual Classroom.
Part I – Answer
the following questions while in the Phase 5 lab environment.
Section 1 – From the left of the screen to the
right, the red balls have a center
of mass placed at 20 feet, 15 feet, and 10 feet high respectively.
Suppose
each red ball weighs 20 lbs.  Find the
potential energy (PE) for each ball
on each ramp.  In this lab mass is given
in pounds and height is in feet, so use 32.2
ft/sec2 as the gravitational constant.  Your answer will be in foot-pounds since US
units are being used.
PE
= m g h   where g = 32.2 ft/sec2
Ramp
1:
Ramp
2:
Ramp
3:
Predict
the maximum speed (velocity) of each ball on each ramp.  How would this speed change if each ball’s
mass was doubled?  ASSUMPTION: assume there is no friction and that all the potential
energy you calculated in question 1 is transformed into kinetic energy – PE =
KE.  Use the following equation.
KE=
½ m v2 
You
want to calculate v maximum speed
v
= [KE/ ½ m]½
This
means divide the KE by half the mass and then take the square root.




Max
v for 20 lb. ball



Max
v for 40 lb. ball



Ramp
1









Ramp
2









Ramp
3








Section 2 (Each of the green balls has a center of
mass placed at 20 feet high).  While each
ramp looks identical, each ramp has a different amount of friction. 
Which
ramp has the greatest friction?
Suppose
each green ball weighs 10 lbs.  Assuming
there is no friction, calculate the potential energy for each ball on each
ramp. 
Again
assuming there is no friction; predict the maximum speed of the ball on each
ramp.  On which ramp does the ball come
closest to achieving this max speed?
Use
this table to organize your calculated values




PE



Max
Seed (v)



Ramp
1









Ramp
2









Ramp
3








Part
II – For the following questions, provide your response
in short answer format (2-3 sentences each). Use this Phase’s activities and
resources to assist you in answering:
What
is Potential Energy (PE)?  Give
examples from the lab.
What is Kinetic Energy (KE)? Give examples from the lab.
What
is Inertia?
What
is Gravity? How is it a type of potential energy?
What is Mass and
how does it affect energy?
How
do Potential and Kinetic energy (gravity and mechanical force) apply to the Law
of Conservation of Energy?
What
is Friction? How does it affect energy use?SCI103_Lab5_Updated (1).doc

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Comparative Analysis Problem: Amazon vs. Wal-Mart Stores, writing homework help


Purpose of Assignment
The purpose of this assignment is to evaluate the inventory section
of two companies using basic comparative analysis, and to interpret the
data to gain insight about the company's inventory management.
Assignment Steps
Resources: Financial Accounting: Tools for Business Decision Making
Write a 1,050-word
comparative analysis using the financial statements of Amazon.com, Inc.
presented in Appendix D, and the financial statements for Wal-Mart
Stores, Inc., presented in Appendix E, including the following:Compute these 2014 values for each company based on the information in the financial statements:
Inventory turnover (Use cost of sales and inventories)Days of inventory
Conclusions concerning the management of the inventory can you draw from this data.
Show work on Excel® spreadsheet and submit with analysis.

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questions end of term British and world literature


1. In his stories, Arthur Conan Doyle portrays Sherlock Holmes as __________.
(Points : 5)  an intelligent and highly logical hero who is an archetype for many other literary figures
  a bumbling and unconventional hero who relies on his sidekick to solve cases
  a quiet and unassuming hero who is reluctant to accept any credit for his skills
  a physically strong and highly emotional hero who acts on instinct rather than intellect
Question 2.2. In "The Adventure of the Speckled Band," Sherlock Holmes solves the mystery through his use of _________.
(Points : 5)  supernatural powers
  deductive reasoning
  advanced technology
  luck and guesswork
Question 3.3. One of the most important functions of nature in people's lives, according to Romantic poets, is as __________.
(Points : 5)  a place free of pollution
  a source of raw materials
  an inspirer of poetry
  a teacher of important truths
Question 4.4. In "Odes to the Seasons," Blake personifies spring as __________.
(Points : 5)  a proud tyrant
  a tender lover
  a jolly companion
  a strong charioteer
Question 5.5. A theme shared by Wordsworth's "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" and "Lines on a Beautiful Spring in a Village" is that __________.
(Points : 5)  memories of the natural world comfort those who recall them
  people fail to appreciate the beauty of the natural world
  time in the crowded city causes people to behave unkindly
  childhood is a happier time than adulthood
Question 6.6. In which poem does the speaker use an extended metaphor to describe the cycle of people's lives?
(Points : 5)  Keats's "The Human Seasons"
  Coleridge's "Lines on a Beautiful Spring in a Village"
  Shelley's "The Cloud"
  Blake's "Odes to the Seasons"
Question 7.7. In what section of Romeo and Juliet does William Shakespeare introduce the main characters, major conflicts, and central themes of the play?
(Points : 5)  rising action
  exposition
  climax
  falling action
Question 8.8. Based on their behavior in Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet, how are Benvolio and Tybalt different?
(Points : 5)  Benvolio is a peace-loving man, while Tybalt is quarrelsome and violent.
  Benvolio is fiery and hot tempered, while Tybalt is rational and peaceful.
  Benvolio is melancholy and lovesick, while Tybalt is mirthful and wry.
  Benvolio is reserved and aloof, while Tybalt is affectionate and kind.
Question 9.9. Which character's playful and upbeat personality, demonstrated at the start of the Queen Mab speech, is a natural foil for the melancholy Romeo?
(Points : 5)  Mercutio's
  Capulet's
  Benvolio's
  Tybalt's
Question 10.10. Why does Shakespeare have Romeo and Juliet's dialogue take the form of a sonnet when they first meet?
(Points : 5)  The elevated language Romeo and Juliet use suggests the danger posed to them by fate.
  The elevated language Romeo and Juliet use suggests how love can make characters say and do extraordinary things.
  The elevated language Romeo and Juliet use suggests the mistakes that their characters make due to their hasty choices.
  The elevated language Romeo and Juliet use suggests the great differences that separate their families.
Question 11.11. Which of the following is an example of Romeo using light imagery to suggest Juliet's great beauty?
(Points : 5)  He describes her as a "dear saint" when they first meet.
  He compares her to Venus, the Roman goddess of love, when they marry.
  He refers to her as "the sun" in the balcony scene.
  He alludes to "Petrarch and Laura" when talking of his feelings for her.
Question 12.12. Who is Juliet's closest adviser and confidante in this play?
(Points : 5)  Romeo
  Tybalt
  her mother
  the Nurse
Question 13.13. Early in the play, which character(s) can be best described as practical and eager to take action?
(Points : 5)  Juliet
  Romeo
  both Romeo and Juliet
  neither Romeo nor Juliet
Question 14.14. Which event is the climax of Romeo and Juliet?
(Points : 5)  Romeo's murder of Tybalt
  Mercutio's Queen Mab speech
  the deaths of Romeo and Juliet
  the first meeting of Romeo and Juliet
Question 15.15. When Romeo says __________ he recalls the power that fate has over the destinies of this play's main characters.
(Points : 5)  "O, I am fortune's fool!"
  "You kiss by the book"
  "O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?"
  "A plague o' both your houses!"
Question 16.16. Both Juliet's saying that Romeo looks as though he is in the bottom of a grave at the end of Act 3 and Romeo's description of his dream at the start of Act 5 __________.
(Points : 5)  remind readers of the feud between their families
  highlight Romeo's melancholy nature
  foreshadow Romeo's death
  are causes for optimism in the play
Question 17.17. Because Romeo immediately goes to the apothecary to buy poison when Balthasar tells him that Juliet is dead, readers recognize that __________.
(Points : 5)  Romeo's instincts tell him that Juliet is not truly dead
  Romeo's destiny is no longer under the control of fate
  Romeo's love is no longer as strong as it once was
  Romeo's haste will lead to danger
Question 18.18. Romeo repeatedly mentions how lifelike Juliet appears as he delivers his final speech. In fact, readers know that Juliet is still alive, which makes this an example of __________.
(Points : 5)  situational irony
  intentional irony
  dramatic irony
  verbal irony
Question 19.19. Choose the word or words that best complete the sentence.
For their __________, lions depend almost entirely on meat.
(Points : 2)  diffusion
  sustenance
  seclusion
  detriment
Question 20.20. Choose the word or words that best complete the sentence.
Scientists do not yet know how many people will __________ to this alarming new disease.
(Points : 2)  succumb
  comport
  immerse
  deface
Question 21.21. Choose the word or words that best complete the sentence.
Is it unusual and __________ of me to inject __________ into serious discussions?
(Points : 2)  tenacious…valor
  vehement…suspense
  emphatic…frequency
  eccentric…levity
Question 22.22. Choose the word or words that best complete the sentence.
The poor, hungry __________, lured by the __________ aroma of spices, wandered into a dim alley.
(Points : 2)  zealot….reticent
  deity….genial
  waif….pungent
  benefactor….vapid
Question 23.23. Choose the word or words that best complete the sentence.
The referee issued a firm __________ against the athlete's __________ disregard for of the rules.
(Points : 2)  fiasco….taciturn
  reprimand…blatant
  privilege….livid
  longevity….compliant
Question 24.24. The following sentence may contain a grammar or usage error. Read the sentence and identify its error, if there is one, by choosing the appropriate answer. If there is no error in the sentence, choose no error.
The mayor promised that she would listen to all the people, consult her advisers, and make a fair decision.
(Points : 2)  that she would
  make a fair decision
  consult her advisers
  to all the people
  no error
Question 25.25. The following sentence may contain a grammar or usage error. Read the sentence and identify its error, if there is one, by choosing the appropriate answer. If there is no error in the sentence, choose no error.
The note said, "Go to the library at midnight, for a mystery await you."
(Points : 2)  to the library
  said, "Go
  a mystery await you
  at midnight, for
  no error
Question 26.26. Read the following sentence and decide whether the underlined portion contains a mistake. If it does, identify the best way to correct or improve the sentence by choosing the appropriate suggestion from the answer choices. If the underlined portion requires no improvement or correction, choose No improvement or correction is required.
Venturing bravely into the forest, the heroes comes upon a wrinkled little gnome who asks them three impossible questions.
(Points : 2)  the hero comes upon a wrinkled little gnome who asked them
  the hero came upon a wrinkled little gnome who asks him
  the heroes come upon a wrinkled little gnome who asks them
  the hero come upon a wrinkled little gnome who asks him
  No improvement or correction is required.
Question 27.27. Read the following sentence and decide whether the underlined portion contains a mistake. If it does, identify the best way to correct or improve the sentence by choosing the appropriate suggestion from the answer choices. If the underlined portion requires no improvement or correction, choose No improvement or correction is required.
Both Derek and myself will go to the dance on Friday night if we get permission from our parents.
(Points : 2)  Both myself and Derek
  Both me and Derek
  Both Derek and me
  Both Derek and I
  No improvement or correction is required.
Question 28.28. Read the following sentence and decide whether the underlined portion contains a mistake. If it does, identify the best way to correct or improve the sentence by choosing the appropriate suggestion from the answer choices. If the underlined portion requires no improvement or correction, choose No improvement or correction is required.
Forced to decide between Rosie and Isabel, the teacher gave the prize to her.
(Points : 2)  gave the prize to she
  give the prize to hers
  gave the prize to Isabel
  give the prize to Isabel
  No improvement or correction is required.
Question 29.29. Use Passage 1 to answer the following question.
Why did Dylan write the letter?
(Points : 2)  to tell Jay Bluestone about his career goals
  to boast about his skill as a gamer
  to ask for advice on beginning a career in game design
  to request a job interview
Question 30.30. Use Passage 1 to answer the following question.
What does the word innovative most nearly mean in line 17?
(Points : 2)  hopeful
  creative
  expensive
  sentimental
Question 31.31. Use Passage 1 to answer the following question.
What inference can the reader make from the text of Dylan's letter?
(Points : 2)  Dylan spends too much time playing games and his schoolwork suffers.
  Dylan does not know how fierce job competition is.
  Dylan is a bright, serious person who can succeed at more than one task.
  Dylan's parents do not support his career goals.
Question 32.32. Use Passage 2 to answer the following question.
Which is the clearest and most grammatically correct revision of sentence 4 (reprinted here)? 
The first movie theater opened in 1902 in Los Angeles and it charged five cents so they called it a nickelodeon.
(Points : 2)  The first movie theater opened in 1902 in Los Angeles and they called it called it a nickelodeon, it cost a nickel.
  The first movie theater opened in 1902 in Los Angeles; because admission cost five cents, it was called a nickelodeon.
  The first movie theater opened in 1902 in Los Angeles and charged five cents, called a nickelodeon.
  The first movie theater, opening in 1902 in Los Angeles, charging five cents, it was called a nickelodeon.
Question 33.33. Use Passage 2 to answer the following question.
Which of the following revisions would make the paragraph flow in a more logical order?
(Points : 2)  Put sentence 5 after sentence 6.
  Put sentence 3 after sentence 5.
  Put sentence 1 after sentence 2.
  Put sentence 5 before sentence 1.

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Designing Quantitative Research


Researchers consider validity and reliability with each new study they design. This is because validity and reliability are not fixed but rather reflect a particular study’s unique variables, research design, instruments, and participants.
In the context of research design, two types of validity, which speak to the quality of different features of the research process, are considered: internal validity and external validity. Assuming that the findings of a research study are internally valid—i.e., the researcher has used controls to determine that the outcome is indeed due to manipulation of the independent variable or the treatment—external validity refers to the extent to which the findings can be generalized from the sample to the population or to other settings and groups. Reliability refers to the replicability of the findings.
For this Discussion, you will consider threats to internal and external validity in quantitative research and the strategies used to mitigate these threats. You will also consider the ethical implications of designing quantitative research.
With these thoughts in mind:
WRITE an explanation of a threat to internal validity and a threat to external validity in quantitative research. Next, explain a strategy to mitigate each of these threats. Then, identify a potential ethical issue in quantitative research and explain how it might influence design decisions. Finally, explain what it means for a research topic to be amenable to scientific study using a quantitative approach.
Be sure to support your Main Issue Post and Response Post with references to the  Learning Resources and other scholarly evidence in APA Style.
ReadingsCourse Text: Babbie, E. (2016) Basics of social research (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.Chapter 3, “The Ethics and Politics of Social Research”Course Text: Burkholder, G. J., Cox, K. A., & Crawford, L. M. (2016). The scholar-practitioner’s guide to research design. Baltimore, MD: Laureate Publishing.Chapter 7, “Quality Considerations”Handout: Threats to Internal Validity (PDF)Website: Walden University: Center for Research Quality. (2015b). Research ethics & compliance: Application & general materials. Retrieved fromhttp://academicguides.waldenu.edu/researchcenter/orec/application
Download the “Research Ethics Planning Worksheet” document.Website: Walden University: Center for Research Quality. (2015c). Research resources: Research planning & writing. Retrieved fromhttp://academicguides.waldenu.edu/researchcenter/resources/planning
Download the “Litmus Test” document.Website: Walden University. (2015a). How do I find an article that reports on research that uses a specific methodology? Retrieved from http://academicanswers.waldenu.edu/faq/72633Website: Walden University Writing Center. (2015). Common course assignments: Annotated bibliographies. Retrieved fromhttp://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/assignments/annotatedbibliographiesMediaEndicott, L. (n.d.). IRB ethics review at Walden [Online tutorial]. Retrieved December 30, 2015, fromhttps://crq.adobeconnect.com/irb/Price, S. (2015). Annotated bibliographies [Online webinar]. Retrieved fromhttps://waldencss.adobeconnect.com/p7d6uqxv8g3?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

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