Anonymous
timer Asked: Apr 10th, 2020

Question Description

This assignment is so important, I will upload the instruction and you should use google map view to look at the place and write a report about the street as well as the design you want to make the place better also does not matter how many pages I want full detail and (look at the grading rubric SO IMPORTANT) you will see that in the instructions that you cannot use google map, BUT WITH CORONAVIRUS IS OK SO USE GOOGLE STREET VIEW . also look at the powerpoint it has full details of the feature that the TEACHER want be more sure about GRADING RUBRIC. I attached link that has all the powerpoint also the instructions

https://we.tl/t-rk1GdS8UTY

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Assignment Scenario

The city has hired your consulting firm to develop a Complete Streets improvement plan. You are to identify a street that would be a justifiable candidate for redesign. The selected street should exhibit the characteristics of having high latent demand for non-motorized transport (walking, biking, and transit) that is currently unmet due to the street’s “incomplete” automobile-focused design. Your firm will assess the existing roadside conditions, and will then propose a redesign plan to make the street “complete” for all users.




Unformatted Attachment Preview

Field Project 2: Designing a Complete Street PUP 430 Transportation Planning and the Environment Assignment Scenario The city has hired your consulting firm to develop a Complete Streets improvement plan. You are to identify a street that would be a justifiable candidate for redesign. The selected street should exhibit the characteristics of having high latent demand for non-motorized transport (walking, biking, and transit) that is currently unmet due to the street’s “incomplete” automobile-focused design. Your firm will assess the existing roadside conditions, and will then propose a redesign plan to make the street “complete” for all users. Assignment Steps 1. Team Selection—Form a consulting team, or choose to work individually. Note: Though you may conduct your observations and create a redesign as a group, each group member will write and submit their own individual report. 2. Study Area Selection—Complete the following two steps to select an appropriate study area: A. Preliminary Selection: Consider examples of “incomplete” streets in the Phoenix metro with which you are familiar. Think about those streets located in areas with high latent demand for nonmotorized travel, and hence could be justifiable candidates for a Complete Streets redesign. Study areas should be roughly ½ to 1 mile in length (depending on conditions). B. Latent Demand Analysis: Utilize the latent demand checklist (posted on Canvas) to determine the latent demand for non-motorized activity in your proposed study area. Use your best judgement when using the checklist. A study area with a high latent demand score of 26-39 could be a strong candidate. If the proposed study area has a moderate (19-25) or low (4-18) latent demand score, then consider another location more appropriate for this project. 3. Assessment of Current Conditions— Utilize field observations and the assessment worksheet below,* to identify the current conditions of your study area. During your field visit, examine the existing characteristics of the street that make it “incomplete.” Take photos and selfies (required) during your visit, illustrating the existing issues. When analyzing your study area, also consider network gaps that need to be filled, safety concerns that need to be alleviated, and/or barriers that need to be overcome. *The audit worksheets are intended to serve as a general guide and tool for your assessment and to help you synthesize your observations. Your report, however, should NOT simply be a rehash of what is written in the guide. 4. Complete Streets Plan Preparation—Consider the strategies you plan to incorporate into your study area (based on your field assessment), and develop your redesign plan. Prepare an overhead diagram illustrating the location of all redesign features, as well as a cross-sectional view illustrating the dimensions of the street and its redesigned components. Online tools (such as streetmix.net) can be used for the cross section, while PowerPoint or other illustrating tools (using an overlaid satellite image) can be used for the overhead diagram. 4. Report Formulation— Write a field assessment report on behalf of your transportation consulting firm that clearly and visually presents the findings of your analysis. Field Project Written Report Your written report should be single-spaced, with a space between paragraphs. Your report should include the following sections and headers:  Introduction to Study Area: Briefly introduce the study area, including a satellite image to identify its location and surrounding context.  Latent Demand: Explain why the selected street is a justifiable candidate for a Complete Streets redesign. Discuss the latent demand score determined for the study area, and the features of the surrounding neighborhood context that indicate a high demand for non-motorized modes.  Current Conditions: Discuss the existing characteristics of the selected street that currently make it “incomplete.” Include photos (with selfies) that illustrate these features you observed in the field. Be sure to include captions or figure numbers referred to in the text for all photos, so the reader will know what you are trying to illustrate in the photo.  Complete Street Plan: Discuss your proposal to make the street “complete.” Include both the overhead diagram and a cross-sectional view you prepared. Clearly discuss each of the design features illustrated in the diagrams that your firm is proposing. Explain the purpose of each strategy, and how they will correct the identified deficiencies and make the street “complete” for all users.  Conclusion: Conclude with a brief paragraph summarizing the findings of your research. This project is intended to be highly visual in nature. Photos will help better illustrate the findings of your assessment, and are therefore essential to include as elements in your written report. Google street view images are NOT acceptable. Include “selfies” (required) in front of some of the elements you mention in the report. For all images, be sure to include a caption, or figure number you refer to in the text, so the reader will understand what you are illustrating in the photo. For this project, there is no page-length requirement. Be concise and to-the-point to produce a document that clearly, and above all visually, illustrates your findings. Be sure to include adequate supporting text to explain what you are illustrating. You may use PowerPoint, rather than Word, to create your final product for this assignment, as PowerPoint allows for much easier manipulation of text boxes and images. Field projects must be submitted via the “Field Project 2” link on Canvas by 4:50PM on April 14th. NO late projects will be accepted. Worth 140 points total. See the grading rubric below for the breakdown of points possible. Field Project 2: Designing a Complete Street—Grading Rubric 8 Points 6 Points 3 Points 0 Points Report clearly introduces the study area, and includes a satellite image to identify its location and surrounding context. Report introduces the study area, and includes a satellite image, but with some room for elaboration. Report somewhat introduces the study area, and includes a satellite image, but with much room for elaboration. Report barely introduces the study area, with definite elaboration needed. Does not include a satellite image. Report does not introduce the study area. 25 Points 20 Points 15 Points 7 Points 0 Points Report clearly discusses the latent demand score and features of the surrounding context that indicate a high demand for non-motorized modes. Report discusses the latent demand score and features of the surrounding context, but with some room for elaboration. Report somewhat discusses the latent demand score and features of the surrounding context, but with much room for elaboration. Report barely discusses the latent demand score and features of the surrounding context, with definite elaboration needed. Report does not mention the latent demand score and/or the features of the surrounding context. Current Conditions 25 Points 20 Points 15 Points 7 Points 0 Points Report clearly discusses the existing characteristics of the selected street that currently make it “incomplete.” Report discusses the existing characteristics of the selected street that currently make it “incomplete,” but with some room for elaboration. Report somewhat discusses the existing “incomplete” characteristics of the street, but with much room for elaboration. Report barely discusses the “incomplete” features of the street, with definite elaboration needed. Report does not discuss the “incomplete” features of the street. Proposal Diagrams 25 Points 20 Points 12 Points 0 Points Project Not Accepted Report includes an overhead diagram illustrating location of all redesign features, and cross-sectional view of street dimensions and redesigned components Report includes both an overhead and crosssectional diagram, but with some room for additional detail. Report includes both diagrams, but with much room for additional detail. Diagrams included, but with definite room for additional detail; and/or does not include one of the required diagrams. Report does not include an overhead diagram and cross-sectional view. Introduction 10 Points Latent Demand Proposal Discussion Photos Editing 30 Points 24 Points 18 Points 9 Points 0 Points Report clearly discusses each of the proposed features illustrated in the diagrams, and explains the purpose of each strategy and how they will correct the identified deficiencies of the street. Report discusses the proposed features and their purpose, but with some room for elaboration. Report somewhat discusses the proposed features and their purpose, but with much room for elaboration. Report barely discusses the proposed design features, with definite room for elaboration. Report does not discuss the proposed design features. 15 Points 12 Points 7 Points 0 Points Project Not Accepted Includes photos and a few selfies (with figure #’s or captions) of many of the features discussed in the report. Includes photos and a few selfies (with figure #’s or captions) of some of the features, but with room for some additional images. Includes photos and a few selfies of some of the features discussed, but with no figure #’s or captions, and with room for additional images. Includes photos of a few of the features identified, but with definite room for more; or no selfies included. Does not include photos; or uses Google street view images instead. 10 Points 8 Points 5 Points 0 Points Project Not Accepted No editing errors whatsoever. Minimal proofing & editing and/or content revision needed. Some proofing & editing and/or content revision needed. Substantial proofing & editing and/or content revision needed. Proofing and editing errors distracting and in need of significant correction. Latent Demand Assessment Worksheet Characteristics 1. Land Use Mix 2. Public Schools & Universities 3. Public Facilities (Libraries, city hall, community centers, etc.) 4. Public Parks 5. Urban Trails and Bikeways 6. Population Density 7. Income Level (Annual household income) 8. Age Demographics 9. Employment Density (Jobs/square mile) 10. Trailhead Parking or Park-n-Ride Lots 11. Bus or Light Rail Transit Stations 12. Light Rail Stop 13. Bus Stop Variable Score 5 or more land uses 2-4 land uses 1 land use Agricultural or inaccessible open space 4000+ students 1500-3999 students <1499 students No schools 3 or more facilities 2 facilities 1 facility No facilities Regional park Community park Neighborhood park No parks Regional trail or bikeway Community trail or bikeway Local trail or bikeway No trails or bikeways 8+ dwelling units per acre 4-8 dwelling units per acre <4 dwelling units per acre <$18,600 $18,600-$42,300 $42,300 or more Many young and/or older residents Average number of young/older residents Few young and/or older residents 4,000 or more 1,500-4,000 <1,500 >100 parking spaces 50-99 parking spaces <50 parking spaces Bus and light rail transit station Bus or light rail transit station No station More than one One None More than one One None +3 +2 +1 +0 +3 +2 +1 +0 +3 +2 +1 +0 +3 +2 +1 +0 +3 +2 +1 +0 +3 +2 +1 +3 +2 +1 +3 +2 +0 +3 +2 +1 +3 +2 +1 +3 +2 +0 +3 +2 +0 +3 +2 +0 TOTAL: Score of 26-39 = Destination = Highest latent demand—areas of high intensity with a wide variety of land uses Score of 19-25 = Comfort = Moderate latent demand—high intensity areas with a single or limited mix of land uses Score 4-18 = Safety = Low latent demand—areas of low to medium intensity with little to no mix of land uses Complete Street Field Assessment Worksheet Section 1: Traffic Conditions Description Overall traffic observed was freeflowing, without excessive queuing or congestion Observation Yes No Some Areas 2 Overall traffic volume observed appears to be appropriate for the neighborhood context Yes No Some Areas 3 Percentage of heavy vehicles (trucks) is less than 2% of traffic observed Yes No Some Areas 4 Overall traffic speed observed appears within posted speed limits Yes No Some Areas 5 Posted speed limits appear to be appropriate for the neighborhood context Yes No Some Areas 1 Comments/Notes Section 2: Streets and Intersections Description Well-marked crosswalks provided at intersections Observation Yes No Some Areas 2 Well-marked crosswalks provided at mid-block locations Yes No Some Areas 3 Pedestrian activated “walk” buttons available at crosswalks Yes No Some Areas 4 “Count-down” crosswalk signs show time remaining to cross Yes No Some Areas 5 Adequate time provided to cross the street between signal cycles Yes No Some Areas 6 Crosswalks have audio signals Yes No Some Areas 7 Intersection curb cuts two per corner, not one leading into intersection Yes No Some Areas 8 Medians provide designated refuge locations for midblock street crossing Yes No Some Areas 9 Traffic-calming strategies present at midblock locations, and effectively slow traffic and reduce volume Yes No Some Areas 1 Comments/Notes 10 Traffic-calming strategies present at intersections, and effectively slow traffic and limit pedestrian exposure Yes No Some Areas 11 Textured street pavement at intersections warns motorists of pedestrian crossings Yes No Some Areas Section 3: Sidewalks Description Sidewalks well-maintained Observation Yes No Some Areas 2 Sidewalks continuous and uninterrupted Yes No Some Areas 3 Horizontal separation between sidewalks and traffic (planting strip, parking strip, bike lane, etc.) Yes No Some Areas 4 Vertical separation between sidewalks and traffic (trees, shrubs, walls/fences, parked cars, etc.) Yes No Some Areas 5 Minimal sidewalk encroachments blocking access (power poles, utility boxes, fire hydrants, etc.) Yes No Some Areas 6 Sidewalks ADA accessibility (hard surfaces, no >¼” vertical differences, appropriate slope, width & clearance) Yes No Some Areas 7 Sidewalks visually and texturally distinct from adjacent conditions Yes No Some Areas 8 Minimal multiple-use conflicts on sidewalks (skateboarders, bicyclists) Yes No Some Areas 9 Pedestrian-level lighting creates sense Yes No of safety/security Some Areas 1 10 Traffic noise levels comfortable Comments/Notes Yes No Some Areas Section 4: Amenities 1 2 Description Public drinking fountains available Observation Yes No Some Areas Regularly spaced seating provided along walkways Yes No Some Areas Comments/Notes 3 Trash cans located conveniently Yes No Some Areas 4 Shade trees or structures provide protection from the sun Yes No Some Areas 5 Public art or landmarks provide interest & sense of place Yes No Some Areas 6 Open space and landscaping softens built environment & creates interest Yes No Some Areas Section 5: Bicycle Facilities Description On-street bike lanes provided Observation Yes No Some Areas 2 Off-street designated bicycle path provided Yes No Some Areas 3 Bike lanes/paths continuous and uninterrupted Yes No Some Areas 4 Bike lanes/paths easy to navigate and minimize conflict with traffic Yes No Some Areas 5 Bike lanes/paths free of debris and obstructions, and well-maintained Yes No Some Areas 6 Traffic speeds comfortable for bike riders on adjacent lanes Yes No Some Areas 7 Securable bicycle parking provided at gathering spots Yes No Some Areas 8 Securable bicycle parking provided at bus/transit stops Yes No Some Areas 1 Comments/Notes Section 6: Transit Facilities 1 Description Transit service provided in the area Observation Yes No Some Areas 2 Transit stops well-marked Yes No Some Areas 3 Transit stop structures provide protection from the elements Yes No Some Areas 4 Transit stops have shade trees Yes No Some Areas Comments/Notes 5 Transit stops provide space for wheel chair passengers Yes No Some Areas 6 Transit stops provide comfortable seating Yes No Some Areas 8 Transit stops well-lighted Yes No Some Areas 9 Transit route maps and schedules provided Yes No Some Areas ...
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