English High School Honor class

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timer Asked: Jan 26th, 2021

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10th grade high school Honor English worksheet that we are in very much in need of help. This is a Honor English class

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SPEECH TO THE VIRGINIA CONVENTION GUIDED READING Name: Date: Directions: Read through the text below. Using the guided reading questions in the right column, annotate directly on this handout by writing your answers to the questions. After your first reading, draw a line through the text after the beginning and after the middle to separate it into a beginning, middle, and end. Then complete the SOAPStone at the end. St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia March 23, 1775 MR. PRESIDENT: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. (1) But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do, opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely, and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the House is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfill the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offence, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the majesty of heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings. (2) Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen (3) to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and (4) arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their (5) temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it. (6) (7) I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves, and the House? Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. (8) Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with these war-like preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. (9) I ask, gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for 1. The conjunctions (underlined) in this sentence indicate a shift. What is the shift Henry is making here? 2. Summarize Henry’s main point in this paragraph. 3. This is an allusion to The Odyssey. Who were the Sirens, and why would Henry reference them here? 4. Use context clues to define “arduous” 5. The Latin root of this word is “tempo” meaning “time.” Based on this, what do you think “temporal” means in this sentence? 6. What type of appeal is Henry making by using questions in this paragraph? 7. Explain this metaphor. What two things are being compared and why? 8. Do you know this allusion? If so, what is it? 9. After reading this paragraph, explain whether Henry agrees or disagrees with the men who spoke before him. How do you know? it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us; they can be meant for no other. (10) They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble (11) supplication? What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored (12) its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne. In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. (13) If we wish to be free if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending²if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us! They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so (14) formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance, by lying supinely on our backs, (15) and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature (16) hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were (17) base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable²and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come. (18) It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death! 10. What two things is Henry comparing in this metaphor? What is the effect of the metaphor on Henry’s argument? 11. Henry uses the word “supplication” or other forms like “supplicated” several times. This indicates an important word. If you do not know it, can you figure it out from context? If not, look up the definition. Write your definition here. 12. What is the antecedent of the pronoun “its” here? What word is it taking the place of? 13. What do you think the main point of this long sentence is? Can you find the subject and verb that expresses the main point? 14. Use context clues to define this word? What context clue strategies can you use? 15. Henry uses two metaphors here. What are they? What is being compared in each? 16. This is an archaic, or old, word that we don’t use anymore. What do you think the modern equivalent is? (17) “Base” is being used oddly here. What do you think it means in context? 18. Henry gives several reasons that he thinks the colonists could defeat Britain in a war. What are at least two he mentions in this paragraph? 19. What is the main SUBJECT of Henry’s speech? Does Henry have a thesis that directly states his subject? If so, underline it in the text. 20. What is the OCCASION of the speech, or the event that prompted Henry to give it? 21. Who is Henry’s intended AUDIENCE for the speech? 22. What is Henry’s PURPOSE in the the speech? 23. What type of SPEAKER is Henry, or how does he want his audience to see him? 24. How would you describe Henry’s TONE in the speech? SPEECH TO THE VIRGINIA CONVENTION GUIDED READING ANSWER KEY Teaching Note: Because this guided reading was created for language arts classes, it does not include questions on the history surrounding Henry’s speech. Teachers may want to provide some background information before students read it. St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia March 23, 1775 MR. PRESIDENT: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. (1) But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do, opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely, and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the House is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfil the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offence, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the majesty of heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings. (2) Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen (3) to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and (4) arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their (5) temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it. (6) (7) I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves, and the House? Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. (8) Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with these war-like preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. (9) I ask, gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us; they can be meant for no other. (10) They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. 1. The conjunctions (underlined) in this sentence indicate a shift. What is the shift Henry is making here? He starts with a concession to the patriotism of those he is about to disagree with and then shifts to introducing his opposing opinion. 2. Summarize Henry’s main point in this paragraph. Henry asserts his belief that such an important topic deserves a robust debate, and that, to not engage in the debate would be unpatriotic. 3. This is an allusion to The Odyssey. Who were the Sirens, and why would Henry reference them here? The Sirens lured sailors to their deaths with beautiful songs. Henry is saying the false hopes in the British are tricking colonists into their own destruction. 4. Use context clues to define “arduous” “Arduous” means difficult. The word “struggle” is somewhat synonymous. 5. The Latin root of this word is “tempo” meaning “time.” Based on this, what do you think “temporal” means in this sentence? In this context, “temporal” most closely means “current.” 6. What type of appeal is Henry making by using questions in this paragraph? Emotional appeal with rhetorical questions. 7. Explain this metaphor. What two things are being compared and why? He is directly comparing “experience” to a lamp. He would compare them to convey the idea that how the British have acted in the past will allow the colonists to “see” how they will act in the future. 8. Do you know this allusion? If so, what is it? This is a Biblical reference (Luke 22: 47-48) to the betrayal of Jesus by Judas. According to the Bible, the Roman soldiers who arrested Jesus would be able to identify him when Judas kissed him. (9) After reading this paragraph, explain whether Henry agrees or disagrees with the men who spoke before him. How do you know? He disagrees. See red underlined sections. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble (11) supplication? What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored (12) its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne. In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. (13) If we wish to be free² if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us! They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so (14) formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance, by lying supinely on our backs, (15) and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature (16) hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were (17) base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable²and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come. (18) It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death! 10. What is two things is Henry comparing in this metaphor? What is the effect of the metaphor on Henry’s argument? He compares the troops Britain has sent to enslavers and the “British ministry” to those who forged the chains the enslavers are using. This builds upon Henry’s recurring imagery of comparing the colonists to slaves. 11. Henry uses the word “supplication” or other forms like “supplicated” several times. This indicates an important word. If you do not know it, can you figure it out from context? If not, look up the definition. Write your definition here. “Supplication” is asking or begging. 12. What is the antecedent of the pronoun “its” here? What word is it taking the place of? The antecedent is “throne.’ 13. What do you think the main point of this long sentence is? Can you find the subject and verb that expresses the main point? This is a periodic sentence. The main clause and main point is the simple clause at the end: “We must fight!” (subject = we; verb phrase = must fight) 14. Use context clues to define this word? What context clue strategies can you use? “Formidable” means something of great strength that causes fear. This sentence and the next use the contrast of “weak” and “stronger” to help students guess the meaning. Students may also be aided in determining the meaning if they know the word “adversary.” 15. Henry uses two metaphors here. What are they? What is being compared in each? The first is directly stated, comparing “hope” to a “phantom.” The second is indirect comparing the British again to enslavers (“bound us hand and foot”) 16. This is an archaic, or old, word that we don’t ...
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