Open the following file containing the 10K filing for Adobe Systems Incorporated

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 4th, 2016

Question description

Complete and Submit the following

Open the following file containing the 10K filing for Adobe Systems Incorporated.

As a group, write a 4-5 page paper answering the following questions:

1) What are some of Adobe's product/service segments it provides? Does Adobe have a main product/service? Who are some of the competitors Adobe lists in some of these segments?

2) Review the many Risk Factors provided by Adobe. If the group had $250,000 to invest in Adobe, which 3 or 4 risk factors really cause your group concern, to the point of possibly not investing.

3) Review the section titled, "Management's Discussion and Analysis" (MD&A). What type(s) of information are provided in this section? What did your group find most interesting and why?

4) Review Adobe's financial statements. What was Adobe's fiscal year end for this filing? Did Adobe have any significant increases/decreases year-to-year in specific line items? If so, describe 2 or 3 such items, the amount of the change, and see if you can find any reasons for the large change in the Notes, MD&A, etc.

5) Again, assuming you have $250,000 to invest in Adobe as a group, do individual members of the group consider the company a good investment? If so and/or if not, why/why not?

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 _____________________________ FORM 10-K (Mark One) ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the fiscal year ended November 27, 2015 or TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the transition period from to Commission File Number: 0-15175 ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) _____________________________ Delaware (State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) 77-0019522 (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.) 345 Park Avenue, San Jose, California 95110-2704 (Address of principal executive offices) (408) 536-6000 (Registrant’s telephone number, including area code) Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: Title of Each Class Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (NASDAQ Global Select Market) Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None _____________________________ Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes No Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes No Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer Non-accelerated filer (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes Smaller reporting company No The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, held by non-affiliates of the registrant on May 29, 2015, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was $31,964,797,377 (based on the closing sales price of the registrant’s common stock on that date). Shares of the registrant’s common stock held by each officer and director and each person who owns 5% or more of the outstanding common stock of the registrant have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes. As of January 15, 2016, 498,330,407 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, were issued and outstanding. DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE Portions of the Proxy Statement for the registrant’s 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Proxy Statement”), to be filed within 120 days of the end of the fiscal year ended November 27, 2015, are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof. Except with respect to information specifically incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, the Proxy Statement is not deemed to be filed as part hereof. ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED FORM 10-K TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. PART I Item 1. Item 1A. Item 1B. Item 2. Item 3. Item 4. Business 3 18 30 30 32 32 Risk Factors Unresolved Staff Comments Properties Legal Proceedings Mine Safety Disclosures PART II Item 5. Item 6 Item 7. Item 7A. Item 8. Item 9. Item 9A. Item 9B. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities Selected Financial Data Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk Financial Statements and Supplementary Data Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure Controls and Procedures Other Information 33 34 35 55 58 105 105 105 PART III Item 10. Item 11. Item 12. Item 13. Item 14. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance Executive Compensation Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence Principal Accounting Fees and Services 105 105 Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 106 105 106 106 PART IV Item 15. Signatures Summary of Trademarks Index to Exhibits 107 109 110 2 Table of Contents Forward-Looking Statements In addition to historical information, this Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding product plans, future growth, market opportunities, strategic initiatives, industry positioning, customer acquisition, the amount of recurring revenue and revenue growth. In addition, when used in this report, the words “will,” “expects,” “could,” “would,” “may,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “targets,” “estimates,” “looks for,” “looks to,” “continues” and similar expressions, as well as statements regarding our focus for the future, are generally intended to identify forward-looking statements. Each of the forward-looking statements we make in this report involves risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of this report. You should carefully review the risks described herein and in other documents we file from time to time with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), including our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q to be filed in 2016. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10K. We undertake no obligation to publicly release any revisions to the forward-looking statements or reflect events or circumstances after the date of this document, except as required by law. PART I ITEM 1. BUSINESS Founded in 1982, Adobe Systems Incorporated is one of the largest and most diversified software companies in the world. We offer a line of products and services used by creative professionals, marketers, knowledge workers, application developers, enterprises and consumers for creating, managing, delivering, measuring, optimizing and engaging with compelling content and experiences across multiple operating systems, devices and media. We market and license our products and services directly to enterprise customers through our sales force and to end users through app stores and our own website at www.adobe.com. We offer many of our products via a Software-as-a-Service (“SaaS”) model or a managed services model (both of which are referred to as a hosted or cloud-based model) as well as through term subscription and pay-per-use models. We also distribute certain products and services through a network of distributors, value-added resellers (“VARs”), systems integrators (“SIs”), independent software vendors (“ISVs”), retailers, software developers and original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). In addition, we license our technology to hardware manufacturers, software developers and service providers for use in their products and solutions. Our products run on personal and server-based computers, as well as on smartphones, tablets and other devices, depending on the product. We have operations in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa (“EMEA”) and Asia-Pacific (“APAC”). See Note 18 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further geographical information. Adobe was originally incorporated in California in October 1983 and was reincorporated in Delaware in May 1997. We maintain executive offices and principal facilities at 345 Park Avenue, San Jose, California 95110-2704. Our telephone number is 408-536-6000 and our website is www.adobe.com. Investors can obtain copies of our SEC filings from this site free of charge, as well as from the SEC website at www.sec.gov. The information posted to our website is not incorporated into this Annual Report on Form 10-K. BUSINESS OVERVIEW For over 30 years, Adobe’s innovations have transformed how individuals, businesses and governments interact. Across these markets, we help our customers create and deliver the most compelling experiences in a streamlined workflow, and optimize those experiences for greater return on investment. Our solutions turn ordinary interactions into valuable digital experiences, across media and devices, anywhere, anytime. While we continue to offer a broad portfolio of products and solutions, we focus our investments in two strategic growth areas: Digital Media—providing tools, services and solutions that enable individuals, small and medium businesses and enterprises to create, publish and promote their content anywhere. Our customers include content creators, web designers, app developers and digital media professionals, as well as management in marketing departments and agencies, companies and publishers. Our customers also include knowledge workers who create, collaborate and distribute documents. This is the core of what we have delivered for over 25 years, and we have evolved our business model rapidly to provide these customers with a more complete and integrated workflow across the variety of new devices, formats and business models that continue to emerge. Digital Marketing—providing solutions and services for creating, managing, executing, measuring and optimizing digital advertising and marketing campaigns across multiple channels. Our customers include marketers, advertisers, agencies, publishers, merchandisers, web analysts, marketing executives, information management executives, product development executives, and 3 Table of Contents sales and support executives. We process over forty trillion data transactions a year via our SaaS products, providing our customers with analytics, social, targeting, media optimization, digital experience management, cross-channel campaign management, audience management and video solutions. This complements our digital media franchise, bringing together the art of creating and managing content with the science of measuring and optimizing it, enabling our customers to achieve their optimal business outcomes. We believe we are uniquely positioned to be a leader in both the Digital Media and Digital Marketing categories, where our mission is to change the world through digital experiences. By integrating products from each of these two areas of Adobe’s business, our customers are able to utilize a comprehensive suite of solutions and services that no other entity currently offers. In addition, our ability to deliver innovation and productivity improvements across customer workflows involving the creation, management, delivery, measurement and optimization of rich and engaging content favorably positions Adobe as our customers invest more to engage their constituents digitally. SEGMENTS Our business is organized into three reportable segments: Digital Media, Digital Marketing and Print and Publishing. These segments provide Adobe’s senior management with a comprehensive financial view of our key businesses. Our segments are aligned around the company’s two strategic growth opportunities described above, placing our Print and Publishing business in a third segment that contains many of our mature products and solutions. This overview provides an explanation of our markets and a discussion of strategic opportunities in fiscal 2016 and beyond for each of our segments. See “Results of Operations” within Part II, Item 7 titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 18 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further segment information. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OVERVIEW Digital Media Digital Media Opportunity Recent trends in digital communications continue to provide a significant market opportunity for Adobe in digital media. Due to the increase in mobile computing, rich media consumed in digital environments and the rise of online social communities, the demand for digital media solutions to create engaging online experiences is higher than ever. Adobe is in a unique position to capitalize on this opportunity by delivering rapid innovation to increase our customer reach, deepen engagement with communities and accelerate long-term revenue growth by focusing on cloud-based offerings, which are licensed on a subscription basis. The flagship of our Digital Media business is Creative Cloud—a subscription service that allows members to download and install the latest versions of our creative products such as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe InDesign. Creative Cloud members can also access a growing marketplace of digital content through Adobe Stock, a leading online marketplace for photos, graphics and videos. Creative Cloud also offers members access to online services to sync, store, and share files, participate in our Behance community of more than five million creative professionals, publish and deliver digital content via app stores, develop mobile apps, and create and manage websites. Adobe is redefining the creative process with Creative Cloud so that our customers can obtain everything they need to create, collaborate and deliver engaging digital content. Creative Cloud addresses the needs of creative professionals including graphic designers, production artists, web designers and developers, user interface designers, videographers, motion graphic artists, prepress professionals, video game developers, mobile application developers, students and administrators. They rely on our solutions for publishing, web design and development, video and animation production, mobile app and gaming development and document creation and collaboration. End users of our creative tools work in businesses ranging from large publishers, media companies and global enterprises, to smaller design agencies, small and medium-sized businesses and individual freelancers. Moreover, our creative products are used to create much of the printed and online information people see, read and interact with every day, including video, animation, mobile and advertising content. Knowledge workers, educators, hobbyists and consumers also use our products to create and deliver creative content. In addition to Creative Cloud, our Digital Media business offers many of the products included in Creative Cloud on a standalone basis, including subscriptions to the Creative Cloud version of certain point products, and also offers a range of other creative tools and services, including our hobbyist products such as Adobe Photoshop Elements and Adobe Premiere Elements, Adobe Digital Publishing Solution (formerly Adobe Digital Publishing Suite), Adobe Typekit and mobile apps such as Adobe Photoshop Mix, Adobe Photoshop Sketch, Adobe Photoshop Fix and Adobe Premiere Clip that run on tablets and mobile devices. Further descriptions of our Digital Media products are included below under “Principal Products and Services”. 4 Table of Contents Adobe’s Digital Media segment also includes our Document Cloud business, built around our Acrobat family of products, the Adobe Acrobat Reader and a set of integrated cloud-based document services. For over twenty years, Adobe Acrobat has provided for the reliable creation and exchange of electronic documents, regardless of platform or application source type. Users can collaborate on documents with electronic comments and tailor the security of a file in order to distribute reliable Adobe PDF documents that can be viewed, printed or filled out utilizing our free Adobe Acrobat Reader. Acrobat provides essential electronic document capabilities and services to help knowledge workers accomplish a wide range of tasks ranging from simple publications and forms to mission-critical engineering documentation and architectural plans. With our Acrobat product and its innovative cloud services, we have extended the capabilities of our solution. Users can take advantage of electronic document signing with Adobe eSign (formerly EchoSign) and manage, track and control documents through Adobe Send & Track. Digital Media Strategy Our goal is to be the leading provider of tools and services that allow individuals, small and medium businesses and enterprises to create, publish and monetize their content anywhere. Creative Cloud, a subscription service with competitive monthly pricing, is attractive to users of older versions of our products who desire to use our latest releases and services, but who in the past have been unwilling to upgrade to newer versions due to price sensitivity. Similarly, as we gain new customers, we expect to continue to drive new user adoption of our creative business over the next several years outside of our core creative professional target market because of Creative Cloud’s attractive monthly subscription pricing combined with the strong brand of our creative products and the broad value proposition provided by Creative Cloud. We anticipate that our sustained focus on a subscription model will continue to increase the amount of our recurring revenue that is ratably reported, driven by broader Creative Cloud adoption over the next several years. To accelerate the adoption of Creative Cloud, we have focused on migrating existing users of our creative products from perpetual licenses to a subscription-based offering, as well as driving new customer adoption. Aspects of this strategy include: focusing future innovation by our engineering teams on delivering new cloud-based functionality, such as Creative Cloud Libraries and Adobe CreativeSync, to enable our customers to use our creative tools and services across a variety of devices in ways that are not possible with previous desktop versions; integrating Creative Cloud with our Adobe Stock online marketplace offerings; increasing the value of Creative Cloud by delivering frequent product updates and enhancements to subscribers to address their content creation challenges; using promotions to attract customers to the offering; expanding our go-to-market reach through channel partners to reach new customers; and utilizing Creative Cloud for teams and Creative Cloud for enterprise offerings to drive broad adoption with customers who license our products in volume. As part of our Creative Cloud strategy, we utilize our digital marketing solutions to drive customer awareness of our creative products and increase sales of our products through our website and across other channels. Adobe.com is increasingly becoming the destination site where we engage individual and small business customers to sign up for and renew Creative Cloud subscriptions. We utilize channel partners to target mid-size creative customers with our Creative Cloud for teams offering. Our direct sales force is focused on building relationships with our largest customers and driving adoption of our Creative Cloud for enterprise offering. In our Document Cloud business, although Acrobat has achieved strong market adoption in document-intensive industries such as government, financial services, pharmaceutical, legal, aerospace, insurance and technical publishing, we believe there are tens of millions of users who still need the capabilities provided by Acrobat. We plan to continue to market the benefits of our Document Cloud solutions, combined with the low entry point of subscription-based pricing, to individuals as well as small and medium-sized businesses, large enterprises and government institutions around the world and increase our seat penetration in these markets through the utilization of our corporate and volume licensing programs. We also intend to increase our focus on marketing and licensing Acrobat in targeted vertical markets such as education, financial services, telecommunications and government, as well as on expanding into emerging markets, while simultaneously enhancing and building out the delivery of cloud-based document services to our Acrobat and Adobe Acrobat Reader users. We intend to continue to promote the capabilities of our cloud-based document solution, such as its integration with users’ Dropbox documents, to millions of Acrobat users and hundreds of millions of Adobe Acrobat Reader users. Our Adobe eSign services provide a green alternative to costly paper-based solutions, and are an easier way for customers to manage their contract workflows. We believe that by growing the awareness of eSign services in the broader contract delivery and signing market and continuing to add new capabilities to this offering, we can help our customers migrate away from paper-based express mailing and adopt our solution, growing our revenue with this business in the process. Digital Marketing Digital Marketing Opportunity Consumers today increasingly demand personalized content and experiences in their online interactions, across multiple channels and devices. As a result, any business or entity with an online presence must figure out how to best attract, engage, acquire and retain customers in a world where the reach and quality of experiences directly impacts success. Delivering the best experience 5 Table of Contents to a consumer at a given moment requires the right combination of data, insights and content. Marketing executives are increasingly demanding solutions that optimize their consumers’ experiences and deliver the greatest return on their marketing spend so they can demonstrate the success of their programs using objective metrics. We believe there is a significant opportunity to address these challenges and help customers transform their businesses. Chief Marketing Officers, digital marketers, advertisers and publishers are increasingly steering their marketing, advertising, and development budgets toward digital media. Many industry analysts predict more advertising dollars will be spent in digital than in traditional media in the future. As marketers make this move to digital, our opportunity is accelerating as customers look for vendors to help them navigate this transition. However, marketing in a digital world is not simply about executing campaigns in each digital channel. Marketers, and entire enterprises, also need to ensure they deliver meaningful experiences to their consumers across both digital and traditional channels and in areas such as sales, support, and product interactions where consumers expect experiences to be personalized. Our Digital Marketing business targets this large and growing opportunity by providing comprehensive solutions that include analytics, social marketing, targeting, media optimization, digital experience management, cross-channel campaign management, audience management, premium video delivery and monetization. We deliver these capabilities through our Adobe Marketing Cloud, an integrated offering enabling marketers to measure, personalize and optimize marketing campaigns and digital experiences across channels for optimal marketing performance. With its broad set of solutions, including Adobe Analytics, Adobe Target, Adobe Social, Adobe Media Optimizer, Adobe Experience Manager, Adobe Campaign, Adobe Audience Manager and Adobe Primetime, as well as real-time dashboards and a collaborative interface, customers of Adobe Marketing Cloud are able to combine data, insights and digital content to deliver a personalized brand experience to their consumers. In addition to Chief Marketing Officers and digital marketers, users of our Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions include marketing professionals such as search engine marketers, media managers, media buyers and marketing research analysts. Customers also include web content editors, web analysts and web marketing managers. These customers often are involved in workflows that utilize other Adobe products, such as our Digital Media offerings and our video workflow and delivery technologies. By combining the creativity of our Digital Media business with the science of our Digital Marketing business, we help our customers to more efficiently and effectively make, manage, measure and monetize their content across every channel with an end-to-end workflow and feedback loop. Our Digital Marketing segment also contains two legacy enterprise software offerings: our Adobe Connect web conferencing platform and Adobe LiveCycle, an enterprise document and forms platform. Since fiscal 2012, the focus of marketing and licensing of these products has been to financial services and government markets, driven by a subset of our enterprise sales force. We have also been focused on migrating some legacy LiveCycle customers to an updated offering with similar capabilities based on our Adobe Experience Manager solution. Digital Marketing Strategy Our goal is to be the leading provider of marketing solutions and a standard for the way digital advertising and marketing is created, measured, managed, executed and optimized. We believe that our success will be driven by focusing our efforts on making Adobe Marketing Cloud the most comprehensive and integrated marketing solution available. Adobe Marketing Cloud consists of eight key solutions—Adobe Analytics, Adobe Target, Adobe Social, Adobe Media Optimizer, Adobe Experience Manager, Adobe Campaign, Adobe Audience Manager and Adobe Primetime. Adobe Marketing Cloud provides marketers with key capabilities, such as the ability to: • Combine data across the Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions and third-party data sources, such as customer relationship management, point of sale, email, and survey, to create a single view of the consumer; • Deliver personalized customer experiences across channels and on any device; • Use predictive analytics to enable marketers to utilize past marketing program data and success to predict and drive their future success with digital marketing programs; • Access all Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions from one centralized platform and visualize, socialize, and collaborate across teams with the interface; • Interact with creatives through integration with Creative Cloud, enabling content creators and marketers to collaborate and communicate in real time within a cloud-based platform; • Accurately forecast and continually optimize their mix of campaigns across digital media; 6 Table of Contents • Provide robust cross-channel campaign management capabilities utilizing real-time insights, rich customer data and a sophisticated automation and execution platform; • Manage, publish, track, and monetize social programs; • Store, assemble, and distribute digital assets to deliver high-quality brand, campaign, and content experiences; • Build unique audience profiles, allowing marketers to identify their most valuable segments and use them across digital channels; • Easily add, alter, and deploy marketing tags on websites, resulting in consistent page performance and accurate data collection; and • Integrate with a robust network of partners, covering the expansive digital marketing ecosystem. To drive growth of Adobe Marketing Cloud, we also intend to streamline how customers learn about, acquire and deploy Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions. We believe we can accelerate the growth of our business by continuing to build out more direct sales capacity, as well as continuing to enable a rich ecosystem of agencies and SIs who sell, implement and service our solutions. We believe these investments will result in continued growth in revenue in our Digital Marketing segment in fiscal 2016 and beyond. Print and Publishing Our Print and Publishing segment contains legacy products and services that address diverse market opportunities including eLearning solutions, technical document publishing, web application development and high-end printing. Graphics professionals and professional publishers continue to require quality, reliability and efficiency in production printing, and our Adobe PostScript and Adobe PDF printing technologies provide advanced functionality to meet the sophisticated requirements of this marketplace. As high-end printing systems evolve and transition to fully digital, composite workflows, we believe we are uniquely positioned to be a supplier of software and technology based on the PostScript and Adobe PDF standards for use by this industry. We generate revenue by licensing our technology to OEMs that manufacture workflow software, printers and other output devices. In fiscal 2015, we maintained a relatively consistent quarterly revenue run-rate with the mature products we market and license in our Print and Publishing business. PRINCIPAL PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Digital Media Products Creative Cloud Creative Cloud is a subscription offering that enables the creation of rich and engaging digital content. Through Creative Cloud, users can easily explore, create, publish and share their work across devices, the desktop and the web. Members have access to a vibrant creative community, publishing services to deliver apps and websites, cloud storage to easily access their work, the ability to sync their files to virtually any device, collaboration capabilities with team members, and new products and exclusive updates as they are developed. Creative Cloud members can build a Creative Profile which persists wherever they are. A user’s Creative Profile moves with them via Creative Cloud services from app-to-app and device-to-device, giving them immediate access to their personal files, photos, graphics, colors, fonts, text styles, desktop setting customizations and other important assets. Furthermore, CreativeSync synchronizes all files, photos, fonts and other assets used in a particular workflow so that users can begin creative work on any device and seamlessly continue it on another. New Creative Cloud services have been developed and delivered to subscribers to increase the utilization of Creative Cloud capabilities beyond the use of our desktop applications. One of these new services, Adobe Stock, is an online marketplace with over 40 million curated photos, graphics and videos that is deeply integrated with Creative Cloud apps. We believe services such as Adobe Stock will drive higher user interaction with Creative Cloud and create upsell opportunities as users increasingly utilize higher-tiered versions of these services. New mobile apps that run on tablets and smartphones enable connections between essential Creative Cloud desktop tools and a new family of mobile apps that extend the capabilities of Photoshop, Illustrator, Premiere Pro and Lightroom onto mobile devices. Our mobile apps enable users to create designs with tablets and bring them into their creative workflows. 7 Table of Contents We license Creative Cloud to individuals and teams of users through Adobe.com either on a monthly subscription basis or as an annual subscription. Channel partners also license Creative Cloud with annual team subscriptions to small or medium-sized businesses, or to workgroups in enterprises. With larger enterprise customers, our direct sales force utilizes enterprise term license agreements (“ETLAs”), for volume-based agreements often for multi-year terms. Photoshop Adobe Photoshop CC is the world’s most advanced digital imaging software. It is used by photographers, designers, animators, web professionals, and video professionals, and is available to Creative Cloud subscribers. Customers can also subscribe to Photoshop CC as an individual subscription product, or through our Creative Cloud Photography Plan, which is an offer targeted at photographers and photo hobbyists and includes our popular Photoshop Lightroom product as a companion tool to Photoshop. We also offer Photoshop Elements separately, which is targeted at consumers who desire the brand and power of Photoshop through an easy-to-use interface. For tablet and smartphone users, we offer several mobile apps including Photoshop Sketch, Photoshop Mix, Lightroom for mobile and Photoshop Fix—all of which enable sophisticated photo editing and content creation using a touchbased interface on tablet and mobile devices. Illustrator Adobe Illustrator CC is our industry-standard vector graphics software used worldwide by designers of all types who want to create digital graphics and illustrations for all kinds of media: print, web, interactive, video, and mobile. Illustrator is available to Creative Cloud subscribers, and customers can also subscribe to use it as an individual subscription product. Users can also utilize mobile apps such as Illustrator Draw to gain access to Illustrator capabilities on their tablets and mobile devices, and sync their work through CreativeSync for use with Illustrator on their desktop. InDesign InDesign is the leading professional page layout software for print and digital publishing. Our customers use it to design, preflight, and publish a broad range of content including newspapers and magazines for print, online, and tablet app delivery. Customers can create simple or complex layouts quickly and efficiently with precise control over typography, built-in creative tools, and an intuitive design environment. Tight integration with other Adobe software such as Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat, and Adobe Animate enables customers to work productively in print and digital workflows. Customers can also access Adobe Digital Publishing Solution from within InDesign to create and publish engaging apps for a broad range of devices, including iOS, Android and Amazon-based devices. InDesign is built for designers, prepress and production professionals, and print service providers who work for magazines, design firms, advertising agencies, newspapers, book publishers, and catalog companies, as well as in corporate design, commercial printing, and other leading-edge publishing environments. Customers using InDesign often use Adobe InCopy, a companion product used for professional writing and editing to enable an efficient collaborative workflow between design and editorial staff. InDesign and InCopy are available to Creative Cloud subscribers, and customers can also subscribe to use InDesign as an individual subscription product. Adobe Premiere Pro Adobe Premiere Pro is our powerful, customizable, nonlinear video editing tool used by video professionals. Customers can import and combine virtually any type of media, from video shot on a smartphone to raw 4K and higher resolution footage, and then edit in its native format without transcoding. The user interface includes a customizable timeline and numerous editing shortcuts which enable faster, keyboard-driven editing. With the demands of shorter production schedules and high-resolution digital media formats, real-time performance is crucial to videographers. Premiere Pro utilizes our Mercury Playback Engine to provide the fastest performance solution in the industry. It also supports a vast majority of formats, and customers can now use multiple graphics cards to accelerate render and export times. As part of Creative Cloud, Premiere Pro tightly integrates with other Adobe creative applications. Customers can also subscribe to use it as an individual subscription product. To address the increase in use of video capture and sharing on mobile devices, we offer Adobe Premiere Clip, which provides users with easy-to-use features to quickly edit and enhance video, and Adobe Capture CC, which provides an easy way to capture and share production-quality lighting and color schemes. We also offer an Elements version of Premiere Pro, which is a powerful yet easy-to-use video-editing software for home video editing. Premiere Elements provides tools for hobbyists to quickly edit and enhance video footage with fun effects and transitions and create custom DVDs for sharing video with friends and family. 8 Table of Contents After Effects After Effects is our industry-leading animation and creative compositing software used by a wide variety of motion graphics and visual effects artists. It offers superior control, a wealth of creative options, and integration with other post-production applications. After Effects is available to Creative Cloud subscribers, and customers can also subscribe to use it as an individual subscription product. Dreamweaver Dreamweaver provides a complete toolset for professional web designers and front-end developers to create, code and manage modern, responsive websites. Dreamweaver makes it fast and efficient to design and develop responsive sites from scratch or with built-in templates, preview them in real time on mobile devices and quickly extract web-optimized elements from Adobe Photoshop documents directly into projects. Dreamweaver recently combined innovative visual aids with first-class support for the Bootstrap framework, making it the premiere tool for responsive web design. Device Preview in Dreamweaver makes it easy to preview and inspect websites or mobile app designs on actual devices. As part of Creative Cloud, Dreamweaver tightly integrates with other Adobe creative applications like Photoshop, as well as services like Adobe Stock and Typekit. Customers can also subscribe to use Dreamweaver as an individual subscription product. Animate Adobe Animate CC, formerly Adobe Flash Professional, is the leading toolset for professional designers to create interactive animations, and publish them to multiple formats or platforms - including HTML5 Canvas, WebGL, SWF, FLV or even custom platforms. Using Animate, professional designers can reach viewers on virtually any desktop or mobile device. Animate is available to Creative Cloud subscribers, and customers can also subscribe to use it as an individual subscription product. Digital Publishing Solution Adobe Digital Publishing Solution is a complete solution that enables media publishers, large brand organizations, enterprise customers and advertising agencies to transform their print publications into interactive digital reading experiences for tablet devices and smartphones. Consisting of hosted services and viewer technology, Digital Publishing Solution tightly integrates with our Creative Cloud applications for efficient design, distribution, and monetization of a new class of innovative magazines, newspapers, brand loyalty materials, merchandising content, marketing communications, and more. A wide range of media publishers have used Digital Publishing Solution to produce well-known titles. Businesses are also using Digital Publishing Solution to produce corporate publications. Typekit Adobe Typekit is a subscription font service that brings thousands of fonts from foundry partners into one library for quick browsing, easy use on the web or on the user’s desktop, and endless typographic inspiration. The full font library is available to Creative Cloud subscribers, while a more limited option is available to consumers free of charge. Behance Behance is the leading social community to showcase and discover creative work online. Adobe Portfolio allows users to quickly and simply build a fully customizable and hosted website that seamlessly syncs with Behance. Acrobat and Document Cloud Adobe Document Cloud is a complete portfolio of secure digital document solutions that speeds business transactions through digital workflows. With Adobe Document Cloud, users can create, review, approve, sign and track documents, whether on a desktop or mobile device. At the heart of Adobe Document Cloud is Adobe Acrobat DC, the industry standard for PDF creation and conversion. Acrobat enables users to create secure, reliable and compact Adobe PDF documents from desktop authoring applications such as Microsoft Office software, graphics applications and more. Use of Acrobat enables automated collaborative workflows with a rich set of commenting tools and review tracking features and includes everything needed to create and distribute rich, secure electronic documents that can be viewed easily within leading web browsers or on computer desktops via the free Adobe Acrobat Reader. Acrobat DC is available to both Creative Cloud and Document Cloud subscribers. Customers can also license Acrobat Pro or Acrobat Standard (which has a subset of Acrobat Pro features) as individual point products, either as a subscription or in the form of desktop software. Adobe Acrobat DC is also available as a free mobile app that allows users to view, create and edit 9 Table of Contents documents, and Mobile Link synchronizes those files across multiple devices. Adobe Acrobat Reader is our free software for reliable viewing, searching, reviewing and printing of Adobe PDF documents on a variety of hardware and operating system platforms. Users of both Adobe Acrobat DC and Adobe Acrobat Reader can also access, edit and save changes to their PDF files stored on the Dropbox website or mobile app. Our eSign Services, which can be purchased as part of Document Cloud, allow users to safely electronically send and sign any document from any device. Adobe eSign Manager DC is a mobile app companion for our eSign Services that allows users to electronically sign documents and forms, send them for signature, track responses in real-time, and obtain instant signatures with in-person signing. Adobe eSign integrates with Adobe Experience Manager Forms to provide seamless experiences to customers across web and mobile sites. We also plan to integrate key components of Adobe Marketing Cloud to help businesses test, measure and manage documents in order to provide the same visibility into usage and interactions with documents that marketers already have with digital marketing assets today. Adobe Marketing Cloud Solutions Adobe Analytics Adobe Analytics helps our customers create a holistic view of their business by turning consumer interactions into actionable insights. With intuitive and interactive dashboards and reports, our customers can sift, sort, and share real-time information to provide insights that can be used to identify problems and opportunities and to drive conversion and relevant consumer experiences. Adobe Analytics enables web, social, video, mobile, attribution, and predictive analytics across online and offline channels to continuously improve the performance of marketing activities. It also provides the ability to perform advanced ad-hoc segmentation and to integrate data from offline and third-party sources. Adobe Target Adobe Target lets our customers test, target and personalize content across multiple devices. With Adobe Target, our customers have the tools they need to quickly discover what gets noticed, what increases conversion, and what keeps consumers coming back for more. Adobe Target paves a path from simple testing to targeting to true segmentation and optimization through A/B and multivariate testing, rules-based targeting and automated decision-making. Adobe Social Adobe Social provides marketers a comprehensive solution to build stronger connections through content guided by tangible data. Customers can create more relevant posts, monitor and respond to conversations, measure results, and connect social activities to business results. With Adobe Social, our customers can: manage social content and activities across multiple social networks and profile pages; listen and respond to consumer conversations in real time; create social campaigns; and track performance with integrated analytics. Adobe Media Optimizer Adobe Media Optimizer is a powerful advertisement management platform. Customers get a consolidated view of how their media is performing, along with tools to both accurately forecast and continually optimize their mix of paid campaigns across digital media. Media Optimizer includes cross-channel optimization capabilities, search engine marketing management, and display and social advertising management. Adobe Experience Manager Adobe Experience Manager helps customers organize, create, and manage the delivery of creative assets and other content across digital marketing channels, including web, mobile, email, communities and video. It enables customers to manage content on premise or host it in the cloud, delivering agile and rapid deployment. With this ultimate control of content and campaigns, customers are able to deliver relevant experiences to consumers that help build the customers’ brand, drive demand and extend reach. Adobe Experience Manager includes digital asset management, web content management, integrated mobile app development, enterprise-level forms management, and social capabilities, providing customers with tools enabling users to improve their market and brand perception and provide a personalized experience to their consumers. Adobe Campaign Adobe Campaign enables marketers to orchestrate personalized experiences determined by each consumer’s behaviors and preferences. As part of its feature set, Adobe Campaign provides visual campaign orchestration, allowing for intuitive design and automated consumer experiences across channels, from one-off campaigns to triggered messages, with a graphically rich interface. Marketers can also integrate consumer data from across marketing channels to develop and deliver more relevant marketing 10 Table of Contents experiences to their consumers. Features also included targeted segmentation, email execution, real-time interaction, in-app messaging, and operational reporting to easily see how well campaigns are performing. Adobe Audience Manager Adobe Audience Manager is a data management platform that helps digital publishers build unique audience profiles in order to identify the most valuable segments and use them across any digital channel. Adobe Audience Manager consolidates audience information from all available sources. It then identifies, quantifies, and optimizes high-value target audiences, which can then be offered to advertisers via an integrated, secure, privacy-friendly management system that works across all advertising distribution platforms. Adobe Audience Manager provides access to multiple data sources, offering digital publishers the ability to use a wide variety of third-party data as well as Audience Manager’s private data co-op. Adobe Primetime Adobe Primetime is a modular platform for video publishing, advertising, and analytics, enabling content programmers and distributors to profit from their video content by making every screen a TV—including personal computer, smartphone and tablet screens. Primetime consists of the following components: PayTV Pass, a universal system for validating access to pay TV content; DRM, which is digital rights management technology to protect video content from unauthorized copying or access; Ad Insertion, providing for the seamless insertion of advertisements into live and video-on-demand content; Ad Decisioning, providing for the ability to determine which advertisements should be published; and Video Player SDK, which gives programmers and distributors the ability to measure, analyze and optimize online video delivery. Other Products and Solutions We also offer a broad range of other enterprise and digital media products and solutions. Information about other products not referenced here can be found on our corporate website, www.adobe.com, under the “Products” tab available in the “Menu”. COMPETITION The markets for our products and services are characterized by intense competition, new industry standards, evolving business and distribution models, disruptive software and hardware technology developments, frequent new product introductions, short product life cycles, price cutting with resulting downward pressure on gross margins and price sensitivity on the part of consumers. Our future success will depend on our ability to enhance and better integrate our existing products, introduce new products on a timely and cost-effective basis, meet changing customer needs, provide best-in-class information security to build customer confidence and combat cyber-attacks, extend our core technology into new applications and anticipate and respond to emerging standards, business models, software delivery methods and other technological changes. Digital Media No single company has offerings identical to our Creative Cloud products and services, but we face collective competition from a variety of point offerings, free products and downloadable apps. Our competitors include offerings from companies such as Apple, Autodesk, Avid, Corel, Microsoft, Quark, Getty Images, Shutterstock and others, as well as from many lower-end offerings available on touch-enabled devices via app stores, and from various open source initiatives. We believe our greatest advantage in this market is the scope of our integrated solutions, which work together as part of Creative Cloud. With Creative Cloud we also compete favorably on the basis of features and functionality, ease of use, product reliability, value and performance characteristics. Professional digital imaging, drawing and illustration products are characterized by feature-rich competition, brand awareness and price sensitivity. Competition in this market is also emerging with drawing and illustration applications on tablet and smartphone platforms. The demand for professional web page layout and professional web content creation tools is constantly evolving and highly volatile. In this area we face direct and indirect competition from desktop software companies and various proprietary and open source web-authoring tools. The needs of digital imaging and video editing software users are constantly evolving due to rapid technology and hardware advancements in digital cameras, digital video cameras, printers, personal computers, tablets, smartphones and other new devices. Our imaging and video software offerings, including Photoshop, Lightroom, After Effects and Premiere Pro, face competition from established and emerging companies offering similar products. New image editing applications for mobile devices and tablets with features that compete with our professional products are also emerging as adoption of these devices grows. Our consumer digital imaging and video editing offerings are subject to intense competition, including customer price sensitivity, competitor brand awareness and competitor strength in OEM bundling 11 Table of Contents and retail distribution. We face direct and indirect competition in the consumer digital imaging market from a number of companies that market software that competes with ours. The stock content market has significant competition, especially in the microstock segment, where Adobe primarily operates today with Fotolia.com and the newly launched Adobe Stock offering. Key competitors in this market include Shutterstock,Getty Images and a number of smaller companies. Adobe Stock’s deep product integration with Creative Cloud and superior reach and relationships with creative professionals around the world differentiate our offerings. In addition, we face competition from device, hardware and camera manufacturers as they try to differentiate their offerings by bundling, for free, their own digital imaging software, or those of our competitors. Similarly, we face potential competition from operating system manufacturers as they integrate or offer hobbyist-level digital imaging and image management features with their operating systems. We also face competition from smartphone and tablet manufacturers that integrate imaging and video software into their devices to work with cameras that come as part of their smartphone and tablet offerings. In addition, social networking platforms such as Facebook (including Instagram), Snapchat, Twitter (including Vine) and Pinterest, as well as portal sites such as Google and Yahoo! are becoming a direct means to post, edit and share images, bypassing the step of using image editing and sharing software. Online storage and synchronization are becoming free and ubiquitous. Consumers in particular will be encouraged to use the image and video editing software offered by those storage products, thus competing with our software. Competition is also emerging with imaging and video applications on smartphone and tablet platforms. Competitors are extending their products and feature sets to platforms such as Apple’s iPhone and iPad, and other smartphone and tablet devices. Similarly, new cloud-based offerings continue to emerge which offer image editing and video-editing capabilities, as well as social and sharing features. As customers such as publishers and media companies increase their desire to deliver their assets to new platforms, we expect new and existing companies to continue to offer solutions that address these challenges that are competitive with our Digital Publishing Solution. Many design agencies are building capabilities to offer such solutions, and companies such as Amazon, Apple and Google offer an alternative format and business model for the delivery of newspaper and magazine content to mobile devices. The nature of traditional digital document creation, storage, and collaboration has been rapidly evolving as knowledge workers and consumers shift their behavior increasingly to non-desktop workflows. Competitors like Microsoft, Google, Box and Dropbox all offer competitive alternatives to our Document Cloud business for creating and managing PDFs. In addition, other PDF creation solutions can be found at a low cost or for free on the web. To address these competitive threats, we are working to ensure our Adobe Document Cloud applications stay at the forefront of innovation in emerging opportunities such as PDF document generation, document collaboration and document security. As electronic signatures with Adobe eSign Services are quickly becoming a core element of digital documents, competitors such as DocuSign and Citrix have been jumping in to take advantage of the growing space. We face strong competition from these and other companies in this market. Digital Marketing The markets in which our Digital Marketing business unit competes are growing rapidly and characterized by intense competition. Our Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions face competition from large companies such as Google, IBM, Oracle, salesforce.com, SAP, SAS, Teradata and others, in addition to point product solutions and focused competitors. Additionally, new competitors are constantly entering these markets. Some of these competitors provide SaaS solutions to customers, generally through a web browser, while others provide software that is installed by customers directly on their servers. In addition, we compete at times with our customers’ or potential customers’ internally developed applications. Of the competitors listed above, no single company has products identical to our Adobe Marketing Cloud offerings. Adobe Marketing Cloud competes in a variety of areas, including: reporting and analytics; cross-channel marketing and optimization; online and social marketing; audience management; video delivery and monetization; web experience management and others. Many of the companies with which we compete offer a variety of products or services and as a result could also bundle their products or services, which may result in these companies effectively selling their products or services at or below market prices for individual products. In addition, large software, Internet and database management companies have expanded their offerings in the digital marketing area, either by developing competing services or by acquiring existing competitors or strategic partners of ours. We believe competitive factors in our markets include the proven performance, security, scalability, flexibility and reliability of services; the strategic relationships and integration with third-party applications; the intuitiveness and visual appeal of user interfaces; demonstrable cost-effective benefits to customers; pricing; the flexibility of services to match changing business demands; enterprise-level customer service and training; perceived market leadership; the usability of services; real-time data and reporting; independence from portals and search engines; the ability to deploy the services globally; and success in educating customers in how to utilize services effectively. We believe we compete favorably with both the enterprise and low12 Table of Contents cost alternatives based on many of these competitive factors including our strong feature set, the breadth of our offerings, our focus on global, multi-brand companies, our superior user experience, tools for building multi-screen, cross-channel applications, standards-based architecture, scalability and performance and leadership in industry standards efforts. Creative and digital agencies, as well as SIs, are increasingly investing in acquiring their own digital marketing technology platforms to complement their creative services offerings. Adobe may face competition from these agencies and SIs as they come to market with best-of-breed offerings in one or more digital marketing capabilities, or if agencies attempt to create a more complete technology platform offering. We believe our creative tools heritage differentiates us from our competitors. We have worked closely with marketing and creative customers for over thirty years. We also believe we have leadership in this market, with current customers representing leading global brands. Our comprehensive solutions extend more broadly than any other company in serving the needs of marketers and addressing this market opportunity; we integrate content and data, analytics, personalization, web experience management, cross-channel campaign management, audience management, video delivery and monetization and social capabilities in our Adobe Marketing Cloud, surpassing the reach of any competitor. Most importantly, we provide a vision for our digital marketing customers as we engage with them across the important aspects of their business, extending from their use of Creative Cloud, to how they manage, deliver, measure and monetize their content with our Adobe Marketing Cloud. Print and Publishing Our Print and Publishing product offerings face competition from large-scale electronic and web publishing systems, XMLbased publishing companies as well as lower-end desktop publishing products. Depending on the product line, competition is based on a number of factors, including: the quality and features of products, ease-of-use, printer service support, the level of customization and integration with other publishing system components, the number of hardware platforms supported, service and price. We believe we can successfully compete based upon the quality and features of our products, our strong brand among users, the widespread adoption of our products among printer service bureaus, and our extensive application programming interface. In printing technologies, we believe the principal competitive factors for OEMs in selecting a page description language or a printing technology are product capabilities, market leadership, reliability, price, support and engineering development assistance. We believe that our competitive advantages include our technology competency, OEM customer relationships and our intellectual property portfolio. OPERATIONS Marketing and Sales We market and license our products directly using our sales force and through our own website at www.adobe.com. We also market and distribute our products through sales channels, which include distributors, retailers, software developers, SIs, ISVs and VARs, as well as through OEM and hardware bundle customers. We support our end users through local field offices and our worldwide distribution network, which includes locations in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. We sell the majority of our products through a software subscription model where our customers purchase access to a product for a specific period of time during which they always have rights to use the most recent version of that product. We also license perpetual versions of our software with maintenance and support, which includes rights to upgrades, when and if available, support, updates and enhancements. For fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, there were no customers that represented at least 10% of net revenue. In fiscal 2015 and 2014, no single customer was responsible for over 10% of our trade receivables. Order Fulfillment Distribution The procurement of the various components of packaged products, including DVDs and printed materials, and the assembly of packages for retail and other applications products is controlled by our product delivery operations organization. We outsource our procurement, production, inventory and fulfillment activities to third parties in the United States, Germany and Singapore. To date, we have not experienced significant difficulties in obtaining raw materials for the manufacture of our products or in the replication of DVDs, printing and assembly of components. 13 Table of Contents Our evolution to a services and subscription-based business model has decreased the need to produce and distribute physical products. We still produce packaged products for a subset of our business, but that percentage is declining as the digital delivery of our services and subscriptions continues to grow. Services and Support Adobe Global Services provides expert consulting, customer success management, technical support, and training across all our customer segments, including enterprises, small and medium businesses, creative professionals, and consumers. With a focus on ensuring sustained customer success and realized value, this comprehensive portfolio of services is designed to help customers and partners maximize the return on their investments in our cloud solutions and licensed products. Our service and support revenue consists primarily of consulting fees, software maintenance, technical support fees and training fees. Consulting Services We have a global professional services team dedicated to designing and implementing solutions for our largest customers. Our professional services team uses a comprehensive, customer-focused methodology, that has been refined over years of capturing and analyzing best practices from numerous customer engagements across a diverse mix of solutions, industries, and customer segments. Increasingly, our customers seek to integrate across Adobe’s products and cloud solutions, and engage our professional services teams to share their expertise in leading customers’ digital strategies and multi-solution integrations. Using our methodology, our professional services teams are able to accelerate customers’ time to value, and maximize the return customers earn on their investment in Adobe solutions. In addition, Adobe Global Services focuses on its large and vibrant partner ecosystem that includes a mix of global SIs, regional SIs, VARs, digital agencies, and solution partners. Adobe invests in this ecosystem to ensure its partners have with the right skills and knowledge about our technologies and integration best practices. Consequently, this ecosystem provides our customers several different options to supplement their internal capabilities, and a large accessible pool of skilled resources that can help deploy and manage Adobe solutions. This approach not only creates value for our customers and partners, but also creates a large and productive go-to-market channel for our sales teams. Customer Success Account Management For our largest Digital Marketing and Digital Media customers, Adobe Global Services provides post-sales Customer Success Managers, who work individually with customers on an ongoing basis to understand their current and future business needs, promote faster solution adoption, and align solution capabilities to customers’ business objectives to maximize the return on their investment in Adobe’s solutions. We engage customers to share innovative best practices, relevant industry and vertical knowledge, and proven success strategies based on our extensive engagements with leading marketers and brands. The performance of these teams is directly associated with customer-focused outcomes, notably ongoing customer retention. Technical Support Adobe provides enterprise maintenance and support services to customers of subscription products as part of the subscription entitlement, and to perpetual license customers via annual fee-based maintenance and support programs. These offerings provide: • • • technical support on the products they have purchased from Adobe; “how to” help in using our products; and product upgrades and enhancements during the term of the maintenance and support or subscription period, which is typically one to three years. We provide product support through a global support organization that includes several regional and global support centers, supplemented with outsourced vendors for specific services. Customers can seek help through multiple channels including phone, chat, web, social media, and email, allowing quick and easy access to the information they need. These teams are responsible for providing timely, high-quality technical expertise on all our products. We also offer a range of support programs, from fee-based incidents to annual support contract options. As a registered owner of the current version of an Adobe desktop product, consumers are eligible to receive Getting Started support on certain matters, to support easy adoption of their products. Support for some products and in some countries may vary. For enterprise customers with higher-level support needs, we offer personalized service options through Premium Services options, delivered by technical account managers who can also provide proactive risk mitigation services and on-site support services for those with business critical deployments. 14 Table of Contents Lastly, we also offer delivery assurance, technical support, and enablement services to partners and developer organizations. Through the Adobe Partner Connection Program, we provide developers with high-quality tools, software development kits, information and services. Training Services Adobe Global Services offers a comprehensive portfolio of training services to assist our customer and partner teams in the use of our products, including those within Digital Marketing, Digital Media and other legacy products and solutions. Our training portfolio includes a large number of free online self-service learning options on www.training.adobe.com. These selfservice offerings are supplemented by a number of free introductory programs on best practices that Adobe conducts. Adobe also provides a number of fee-based education options, including a wide range of traditional classroom, virtual, and on-demand training and certifications delivered by our team of training professionals and partners across the globe. These core offerings are complemented by our custom learning and education services, such as our Digital Marketing Learning Center of Excellence, to support our largest enterprise customers and their unique requirements. Solution-specific Skills Assessments help our enterprise customers objectively assess the knowledge and competencies within their marketing teams, and tailor their learning priorities accordingly. Finally, aligned with our cloud strategy, we have introduced a new learning subscription service that enables customers to access all available Digital Marketing training over a 12-month period, to support the ongoing advancement of our customers’ marketing teams and skill sets. Investments We make direct investments in privately held companies. We enter into these investments with the intent of securing financial returns as well as for strategic purposes as they often increase our knowledge of emerging markets and technologies, as well as expand our opportunities to provide Adobe products and services. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT As the software industry is characterized by rapid technological change, a continuous high level of investment is required for the enhancement of existing products and services and the development of new products and services. We develop our software internally as well as acquire products or technology developed by others by purchasing the stock or assets of the business entity that owned the technology. In other instances, we have licensed or purchased the intellectual property ownership rights of programs developed by others with license or technology transfer agreements that may obligate us to pay a flat license fee or royalties, typically based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the revenue generated by those programs. During fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, our research and development expenses were $862.7 million, $844.4 million and $826.6 million, respectively. PRODUCT PROTECTION We regard our software as proprietary and protect it under the laws of copyrights, patents, trademarks and trade secrets. We have a number of domestic and foreign patents and pending applications that relate to various aspects of our products and technology. While we believe our patents have value, no single patent is material to us or to any of our reporting segments. We protect the source code of our software programs as trade secrets and make source code available to third parties only under limited circumstances and subject to specific security and confidentiality constraints. From time to time, we secure rights to third-party intellectual property if beneficial to our business. Our products are generally licensed to end users under one of the following two methods: (1) We offer products on a “right to use” basis pursuant to a license that restricts the use of the products to a designated number of devices, users or both. We also rely on copyright laws and on “shrink wrap” and electronic licenses that are not physically signed by the end user. Copyright protection may be unavailable under the laws of certain countries and the enforceability of “shrink wrap” and electronic licenses has not been conclusively determined in all jurisdictions. (2) We offer products under a SaaS or on-demand model, where hosted software is provided on demand to customers, generally through a web browser. The use of these products is governed by either the online terms of use or an enterprise licensing agreement associated with the product. Policing unauthorized use of computer software is difficult and software piracy is a persistent problem for the software industry. This problem is particularly acute in international markets. We conduct piracy conversion and prevention programs 15 Table of Contents directly and through certain external software associations. In addition, we have activation technology in certain products to guard against illegal use and will continue to do so in certain future products. EMPLOYEES As of November 27, 2015, we employed 13,893 people. We have not experienced work stoppages and believe our employee relations are good. AVAILABLE INFORMATION Our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to reports filed or furnished pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are available free of charge on our Investor Relations website at www.adobe.com/adbe as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. The information posted on our website is not incorporated into this report. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS Adobe’s executive officers as of January 15, 2016 are as follows: Name Shantanu Narayen Age 52 Positions President and Chief Executive Officer Mr. Narayen currently serves as Adobe’s President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Narayen joined Adobe in January 1998 as Vice President and General Manager of Adobe’s engineering technology group. In January 1999, he was promoted to Senior Vice President, Worldwide Products and in March 2001 he was promoted to Executive Vice President, Worldwide Product Marketing and Development. In January 2005, Mr. Narayen was promoted to President and Chief Operating Officer and in December 2007, he was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Adobe and joined the Adobe Board of Directors. Prior to joining Adobe, Mr. Narayen co-founded Pictra Inc., a digital photo sharing software company, in 1996. He was Director of Desktop and Collaboration products at Silicon Graphics Inc. before founding Pictra. Mr. Narayen is also a director of Pfizer Inc. Mark Garrett 58 Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer Mr. Garrett joined Adobe in February 2007 as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Garrett served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the Software Group of EMC Corporation, a products, services and solutions provider for information management and storage, from June 2004 to January 2007, his most recent position since EMC’s acquisition of Documentum, Inc., an enterprise content management company, in December 2003. Mr. Garrett first joined Documentum as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in 1997, holding that position through October 1999 and then re-joining Documentum as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in 2002. Mr. Garrett is also a director of Pure Storage, Inc. and Model N, Inc. Matthew Thompson 57 Executive Vice President, Worldwide Field Operations Mr. Thompson currently serves as Executive Vice President, Worldwide Field Operations. Mr. Thompson joined Adobe in January 2007 as Senior Vice President, Worldwide Field Operations. In January 2013, he was promoted to Executive Vice President, Worldwide Field Operations. Prior to joining Adobe, Mr. Thompson served as Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales at Borland Software Corporation, a software delivery optimization solutions provider, from October 2003 to December 2006. Prior to joining Borland, Mr. Thompson was Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Field Operations for Marimba, Inc., a provider of products and services for software change and configuration management, from February 2001 to January 2003. From July 2000 to January 2001, Mr. Thompson was Vice President of Worldwide Sales for Calico Commerce, Inc., a provider of eBusiness applications. Prior to joining Calico, Mr. Thompson spent six years at Cadence Design Systems, Inc., a provider of electronic design technologies. While at Cadence, from January 1998 to June 2000, Mr. Thompson served as Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales and Field Operations and from April 1994 to January 1998 as Vice President, Worldwide Professional Services. 16 Table of Contents Name Age Michael Dillon 57 Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary 55 Mr. Dillon joined Adobe in August 2012 as Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary. Prior to joining Adobe, Mr. Dillon served as General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Silver Spring Networks, a networking solutions provider, from November 2010 to August 2012. Before joining Silver Spring Networks, Mr. Dillon served in various capacities at Sun Microsystems, a diversified computer networking company, prior to its acquisition by Oracle Corporation. While at Sun Microsystems, from April 2006 to January 2010, Mr. Dillon served as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, from April 2004 to April 2006, as Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, and from July 2002 to March 2004 as Vice President, Products Law Group. From October 1999 until June 2002, Mr. Dillon served as Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of ONI Systems Corp, an optical networking company. Senior Vice President and General Manager, Digital Media 54 Mr. Lamkin currently serves as Senior Vice President and General Manager, Digital Media. He rejoined Adobe in February 2013 as Senior Vice President, Technology and Corporate Development. From June 2011 to May 2012, Mr. Lamkin served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Clover, a mobile payments platform. Prior to Clover, Mr. Lamkin co-founded and served as the Chief Executive Officer of Bagcheck, a sharing and discovery platform, from June 2010 to May 2011. From April 2009 to June 2010, Mr. Lamkin served as Senior Vice President of Consumer Products and Applications at Yahoo!, a global technology company providing online search, content and communication tools. From May 2008 to April 2009 Mr. Lamkin served as Executive in Residence at Sutter Hill Ventures. Mr. Lamkin previously was with Adobe from 1992 to 2006 and held various senior management positions including Senior Vice President, Creative Solutions Business Unit. Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer 48 Ms. Lewnes joined Adobe in November 2006 and currently serves as Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer. Prior to joining Adobe, Ms. Lewnes spent 20 years at Intel Corporation, where she was Vice President of Sales and Marketing. Ms. Lewnes has been elected to the board of directors of Mattel, Inc., effective February 1, 2015. Senior Vice President, Customer and Employee Experience Bryan Lamkin Ann Lewnes Donna Morris Positions Ms. Morris currently serves as Senior Vice President of Adobe’s Global Customer and Employee Experience organization. Ms. Morris joined Adobe as Senior Director of Global Talent Management in April 2002 through the acquisition of Accelio Corporation, a Canadian software company, where she served as Vice President of Human Resources and Learning. In December 2005 Ms. Morris was promoted to Vice President Global Human Resources Operations and subsequently to Senior Vice President Human Resources in March 2007. Abhay Parasnis 41 Senior Vice President, Cloud Technology & Services and Chief Technology Officer Mr. Parasnis joined Adobe in July 2015 as Senior Vice President of Adobe's Cloud Technology & Services organization and Chief Technology Officer. Prior to joining Adobe, he served as President and Chief Operating Officer at Kony, Inc. from March 2013 to March 2015. From January 2012 to November 2013, Mr. Parasnis was a Senior Vice President and later Strategic Advisor for the Oracle Public Cloud at Oracle. Prior to joining Oracle, he was General Manager of Microsoft Azure AppFabric at Microsoft from April 2009 to December 2011. Bradley Rencher 42 Senior Vice President and General Manager, Digital Marketing Mr. Rencher serves as Senior Vice President and General Manager of Adobe’s Digital Marketing business unit. Mr. Rencher joined Omniture, Inc. in January 2008 as Vice President of Corporate Development and was promoted to Senior Vice President of Business Operations prior to Adobe’s acquisition of Omniture in 2009. Following the acquisition he joined Adobe as Vice President of Business Operations. Mr. Rencher was promoted to Vice President and General Manager, Omniture business unit in 2010 and subsequently to Senior Vice President in 2011. Prior to joining Omniture, Mr. Rencher was a member of the technology investment banking team at Morgan Stanley from 2005 to 2008 and a member of the investment banking team at RBC Capital Markets from 1998 to 2004. 17 Table of Contents Name Richard T. Rowley Age 59 Positions Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer Mr. Rowley joined Adobe in November 2006 and currently serves as Vice President, Corporate Controller and Principal Accounting Officer. Prior to joining Adobe, Mr. Rowley served as Vice President, Corporate Controller, Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer at Synopsys, Inc., a semiconductor design software company, from December 2002 to September 2005 and from 1999 to December 2002, Mr. Rowley served as Vice President, Corporate Controller and Principal Accounting Officer. From 1994 to 1999, Mr. Rowley served in several finance-related positions at Synopsys. Mr. Rowley is a certified public accountant. ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS As previously discussed, our actual results could differ materially from our forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed below. These and many other factors described in this report could adversely affect our operations, performance and financial condition. If we cannot continue to develop, market and offer new products and services or enhancements to existing products and services that meet customer requirements, our operating results could suffer. The process of developing new high technology products and services and enhancing existing products and services is complex, costly and uncertain. If we fail to anticipate customers’ changing needs and emerging technological trends, our market share and results of operations could suffer. We must make long-term investments, develop or obtain appropriate intellectual property and commit significant resources before knowing whether our predictions will accurately reflect customer demand for our products and services. If we are unable to extend our core technologies into new applications and new platforms and to anticipate or respond to technological changes, the market’s acceptance of our products and services could decline and our results would suffer. Additionally, any delay in the development, production, marketing or offering of a new product or service or enhancement to an existing product or service could result in customer attrition or impede our ability to attract new customers, causing a decline in our revenue, earnings or stock price and weakening our competitive position. We maintain strategic relationships with third parties to market certain of our products and services and support certain product functionality. If we are unsuccessful in establishing or maintaining our relationships with these third parties, our ability to compete in the marketplace, to reach new customers and geographies or to grow our revenue could be impaired and our operating results could suffer. We offer our products on a variety of personal computers, tablet and mobile devices. Recent trends have shown a technological shift from personal computers to tablet and mobile devices. If we cannot continue to adapt our products to tablet and mobile devices, our business could be harmed. To the extent that consumer purchases of these devices slow down, or to the extent that significant demand arises for our products or competitive products on other platforms before we offer our products on those platforms, our business could be harmed. Releases of new devices or operating systems may make it more difficult for our products to perform or may require significant costs in order for us to adapt our solutions to such devices or operating systems. These potential costs and delays could harm our business. Introduction of new products, services and business models by competitors or others could harm our competitive position and results of operations. The markets for our products and services are characterized by intense competition, evolving industry standards, emerging business and distribution models, disruptive technology developments, short product and service life cycles, price sensitivity on the part of customers and frequent new product introductions (including alternatives with limited functionality available at lower costs or free of charge). Any of these factors could create downward pressure on pricing and gross margins and could adversely affect our renewal and upgrade rates, as well as our ability to attract new customers. Our future success will depend on our ability to enhance our existing products and services, introduce new products and services on a timely and cost-effective basis, meet changing customer needs, extend our core technology into new applications, and anticipate and respond to emerging standards, business models, software delivery methods and other technological developments, such as the evolution and emergence of digital application marketplaces as a direct sales and software delivery environment. These digital application marketplaces often have exclusive distribution for certain platforms, which may make it more difficult for us to compete in these markets. If any competing products, services or operating systems (that do not support our solutions) achieve widespread acceptance, our operating results could suffer. In addition, consolidation has occurred among some of the competitors in the markets in which we compete. Further consolidations in these markets may subject us to increased competitive pressures and may therefore harm our results of operations. The introduction of certain technologies may reduce the effectiveness of our products. For example, some of our products rely on third-party cookies, which are placed on individual browsers when consumers visit websites that contain advertisements. We use these cookies to help our customers more effectively advertise, to gauge the performance of their advertisements, and to detect and prevent fraudulent activity. Consumers can block or delete cookies through their browsers or “ad-blocking” software 18 Table of Contents or applications. The most common Internet browsers allow consumers to modify their browser settings to prevent cookies from being accepted by their browsers, or are set to block third-party cookies by default. Increased use of methods, software or applications that block cookies could harm our business. For additional information regarding our competition and the risks arising out of the competitive environment in which we operate, see the section entitled “Competition” contained in Part I, Item 1 of this report. If we fail to successfully manage transitions to new business models and markets, our results of operations could suffer. We often release new offerings and employ new product and services delivery methods in connection with our diversification into new business models and markets. It is uncertain whether these strategies will prove successful or whether we will be able to develop the necessary infrastructure and business models more quickly than our competitors. Market acceptance of new product and service offerings will be dependent in part on our ability to (1) include functionality and usability that address customer requirements, and (2) optimally price our products and services in light of marketplace conditions, our costs and customer demand. New product and service offerings may increase our risk of liability related to the provision of services and cause us to incur significant technical, legal or other costs. For example, with our cloud-based services and subscription-based licensing models, such as Creative Cloud, we have entered markets that may not be fully accustomed to cloud-based subscription offerings. Market acceptance of such services is affected by a variety of factors, including information security, reliability, performance, customer preference, social and community engagement, local government regulations regarding online services and user-generated content, the sufficiency of technological infrastructure to support our products and services in certain geographies, customer concerns with entrusting a third party to store and manage its data, consumer concerns regarding data privacy and the enactment of laws or regulations that restrict our ability to provide such services to customers in the United States or internationally. If we are unable to respond to these threats, our business could be harmed. From time to time we open-source certain of our technology initiatives, provide broader open access to our technology, license certain of our technology on a royalty-free basis, or release selected technology for industry standardization. Additionally, customer requirements for open standards or open-source products could impact adoption or use of some of our products or services. To the extent we incorrectly predict customer requirements for such products or services, or if there is a delay in market acceptance of such products or services, our business could be harmed. We also devote significant resources to the development of technologies and service offerings in markets where our operating history is less extensive, such as the marketplace for stock imagery. These new offerings and markets may require a considerable investment of technical, financial, compliance and sales resources, and a scalable organization. Some of our competitors may have advantages over us due to their larger presence, larger developer network, deeper market experience and larger sales, consulting and marketing resources. In addition, the metrics we use to gauge the status of our business model transition may evolve over the course of the transition as significant trends emerge. If we are unable to successfully establish new offerings in light of the competitive environment, our results of operations could suffer. Subscription offerings and ETLAs could create risks related to the timing of revenue recognition. Our subscription model creates certain risks related to the timing of revenue recognition and potential reductions in cash flows. A portion of the subscription-based revenue we report each quarter results from the recognition of deferred revenue relating to subscription agreements entered into during previous quarters. A decline in new or renewed subscriptions in any period may not be immediately reflected in our reported financial results for that period, but may result in a decline in our revenue in future quarters. If we were to experience significant downturns in subscription sales and renewal rates, our reported financial results might not reflect such downturns until future periods. Our subscription model could also make it difficult for us to rapidly increase our revenue from subscription-based or hosted services through additional sales in any period, as revenue from new customers will be recognized over the applicable subscription term. Further, any increases in sales under our subscription sales model could result in decreased revenue over the short term if they are offset by a decline in sales from perpetual license customers. Additionally, in connection with our sales efforts to enterprise customers and our use of ETLAs, a number of factors could affect our revenue, including longer than expected sales and implementation cycles, potential deferral of revenue due to multipleelement revenue arrangements and alternate licensing arrangements. If any of our assumptions about revenue from our new businesses or our addition of a subscription-based model prove incorrect, our actual results may vary materially from those anticipated, estimated or projected. Uncertainty about current and future economic conditions and other adverse changes in general political conditions in any of the major countries in which we do business could adversely affect our operating results. As our business has grown, we have become increasingly subject to the risks arising from adverse changes in economic and political conditions, both domestically and globally. Uncertainty about the effects of current and future economic and political 19 Table of Contents conditions on us, our customers, suppliers and partners makes it difficult for us to forecast operating results and to make decisions about future investments. If economic growth in countries where we do business slows, customers may delay or reduce technology purchases, advertising spending or marketing spending. This could result in reductions in sales of our products and services, longer sales cycles, slower adoption of new technologies and increased price competition. Our customers include government entities, including the U.S. federal government, and if spending cuts impede the government’s ability to purchase our products and services, our revenue could decline. Deterioration in economic conditions in any of the countries in which we do business could also cause slower or impaired collections on accounts receivable, which may adversely impact our liquidity and financial condition. A financial institution credit crisis could impair credit availability and the financial stability of our customers, including our distribution partners and channels. A disruption in the financial markets may also have an effect on our derivative counterparties and could also impair our banking partners, on which we rely for operating cash management. Any of these events would likely harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. Political instability in or around any of the major countries in which we do business would also likely harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. The increased emphasis on a cloud strategy may give rise to risks that could harm our business. Over the past several years, our business has shifted away from pre-packaged creative software to focus on a subscription model that prices and delivers our products and services in a way that differs from the historical pricing and delivery methods of our creative tools and document services products. These changes reflect a significant shift from perpetual license sales and distribution of our software in favor of providing our customers the right to access certain of our software in a hosted environment or use downloaded software for a specified subscription period. This cloud strategy requires continued investment in product development and cloud operations, and may give rise to a number of risks, including the following: • if customers desire only perpetual licenses or to purchase or renew subscriptions for specific products rather than acquire the entire Creative Cloud offering, our subscription sales may lag behind our expectations; • our cloud strategy may raise concerns among our customer base, including concerns regarding changes to pricing over time, service availability, information security of a cloud solution and access to files while offline or once a subscription has expired; • customers may turn to competitive or open-source offerings; • we may be unsuccessful in maintaining our target pricing, new seat adoption and projected renewal rates; or we may have to rely heavily on promotional rates to achieve target seat adoption, which could reduce average revenue per user; and • we may incur costs at a higher than forecasted rate as we expand our cloud operations. We may be unable to predict subscription renewal rates and the impact these rates may have on our future revenue and operating results. The hosted business model we utilize in our Adobe Marketing Cloud offerings typically involves selling services on a subscription basis pursuant to service agreements that are generally one to three years in length. Our individual Creative Cloud and Document Cloud subscription agreements are generally month-to-month or one year in length, ETLAs for our Digital Media products and services are generally three years in length, and subscription agreements for other products and services may provide for shorter or longer terms. Our customers have no obligation to renew their subscriptions for our services after the expiration of their initial subscription period, and some customers elect not to renew. We cannot provide assurance that our subscriptions will be renewed at the same or higher level of service, for the same number of seats or licenses or for the same duration of time, if at all. Moreover, under certain circumstances, some of our customers have the right to cancel their service agreements prior to the expiration of the terms of their agreements. We cannot provide assurance that we will be able to accurately predict future customer renewal rates. Our customers’ renewal rates may decline or fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, including their level of satisfaction with our services, our ability to continue to regularly add features and functionality, the reliability (including uptime) of our subscription services, the prices of our services, the actual or perceived information security of our systems and services, the prices of services offered by our competitors, mergers and acquisitions affecting our customer base, reductions in our customers’ spending levels, or declines in customer activity as a result of economic downturns or uncertainty in financial markets. If our customers do not renew their subscriptions for our services or if they renew on terms less favorable to us, our revenue may decline. Our future growth is also affected by our ability to sell additional features and services to our current customers, which depends on a number of factors, including customers’ satisfaction with our products and services, the level of innovation reflected 20 Table of Contents in those additional features, the prices of our offerings and general economic conditions. If our efforts to cross-sell and upsell to our customers are unsuccessful, the rate at which our business grows might decline. Security vulnerabilities in our products and systems could lead to reduced revenue or to liability claims. Maintaining the security of our products, computers and networks is a critical issue for us and our customers. Security researchers, criminal hackers and other third parties regularly develop new techniques to penetrate computer and network security measures and, as we have previously disclosed, certain parties have in the past managed to breach certain of our data security systems and misused certain of our systems and software in order to access our end users’ authentication and payment information. In addition, cyber-attackers also develop and deploy viruses, worms and other malicious software programs, some of which may be specifically designed to attack our products, systems, computers or networks. Sophisticated hardware and operating system applications that we produce or procure from third parties may contain defects in design or manufacture, including bugs and other problems that could unexpectedly compromise the security of the system, or impair a customer’s ability to operate or use our products. The costs to prevent, eliminate or alleviate cyber- or other security problems, bugs, viruses, worms, malicious software programs and security vulnerabilities are significant, and our efforts to address these problems may not be successful and could result in interruptions, delays, cessation of service and loss of existing or potential customers. It is impossible to predict the extent, frequency or impact of these problems on us. Outside parties have in the past and may in the future attempt to fraudulently induce our employees or users of our products or services to disclose sensitive information via illegal electronic spamming, phishing or other tactics. Unauthorized parties may also attempt to gain physical access to our facilities in order to infiltrate our information systems. These actual and potential breaches of our security measures and the accidental loss, inadvertent disclosure or unauthorized dissemination of proprietary information or sensitive, personal or confidential data about us, our employees or our customers, including the potential loss or disclosure of such information or data as a result of hacking, fraud, trickery or other forms of deception, could expose us, our employees, our customers or the individuals affected to a risk of loss or misuse of this information. This may result in litigation and potential liability or fines, governmental inquiry or oversight or a loss of customer confidence, any of which could harm our business or damage our brand and reputation, possibly impeding our present and future success in retaining and attracting new customers and thereby requiring time and resources to repair our brand. These problems affect our products and services in particular because cyber-attackers tend to focus their efforts on the most popular offerings (such as those with a large user base), and we expect them to continue to do so. Critical vulnerabilities may be identified in certain of our applications. These vulnerabilities could cause such applications to crash and could allow an attacker to take control of the affected system, which could result in liability to us or limit our ability to conduct our business and deliver our products and services to customers. We devote significant resources to address security vulnerabilities through engineering more secure products, enhancing security and reliability features in our products and systems, code hardening, conducting rigorous penetration tests, deploying updates to address security vulnerabilities and improving our incident response time, but these security vulnerabilities cannot be totally eliminated. The cost of these steps could reduce our operating margins, and we may be unable to implement these measures quickly enough to prevent cyber-attackers from gaining unauthorized access into our systems and products. Despite our preventative efforts, actual or perceived security vulnerabilities in our products and systems may harm our reputation or lead to claims against us (and have in the past led to such claims), and could lead some customers to seek to return products, to stop using certain services, to reduce or delay future purchases of products or services, or to use competing products or services. If we do not make the appropriate level of investment in our technology systems or if our systems become out-of-date or obsolete and we are not able to deliver the quality of data security customers require, our business could be adversely affected. Customers may also adopt security measures designed to protect their existing computer systems from attack, which could delay adoption of new technologies. Further, if we or our customers are subject to a future attack, or our technology is utilized in a thirdparty attack, it may be necessary for us to take additional extraordinary measures and make additional expenditures to take appropriate responsive and preventative steps. Any of these events could adversely affect our revenue or margins. Moreover, delayed sales, lower margins or lost customers resulting from the disruptions of cyber-attacks or preventative measures could adversely affect our financial results, stock price and reputation. Some of our lines of business rely on us or our third-party service providers to host and deliver services and data, and any interruptions or delays in these hosted services, security or privacy breaches, or failures in data collection could expose us to liability and harm our business and reputation. Some of our lines of business and services, including our online store at adobe.com, Creative Cloud, Document Cloud, other hosted Digital Media offerings and our Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions, rely on hardware and services hosted and controlled directly by us or by our third-party service providers. We do not have redundancy for all of our systems, many of our critical applications reside in only one of our data centers, and our disaster recovery planning may not account for all eventualities. If our business relationship with a third-party provider of hosting or content delivery services is negatively affected, or if one of our content delivery suppliers were to terminate its agreement with us, we might not be able to deliver the corresponding hosted 21 Table of Contents offerings to our customers, which could subject us to reputational harm and cause us to lose customers and future business, thereby reducing our revenue. We hold large amounts of customer data, some of which is hosted in third-party facilities. A security incident at those facilities or ours may compromise the confidentiality, integrity or availability of customer data. Unauthorized access to customer data stored on our computers or networks may be obtained through break-ins, breach of our secure network by an unauthorized party, employee theft or misuse, or other misconduct. It is also possible that unauthorized access to customer data may be obtained through inadequate use of security controls by customers. Accounts created with weak passwords could allow cyber-attackers to gain access to customer data. Additionally, failure by customers to remove accounts of their own employees, or granting of accounts by the customer in an uncontrolled manner, may allow for access by former or unauthorized customer representatives. If there were an inadvertent disclosure of personal information, or if a third party were to gain unauthorized access to the personal information we possess on behalf of our customers, our operations could be disrupted, our reputation could be damaged and we could be subject to claims or other liabilities. In addition, such perceived or actual unauthorized disclosure of the information we collect or breach of our security could damage our reputation, result in the loss of customers and harm our business. Because of the large amount of data that we collect and manage on behalf of our customers, it is possible that hardware or software failures or errors in our systems (or those of our third-party service providers) could result in data loss or corruption or cause the information that we collect to be incomplete or contain inaccuracies that our customers regard as significant. Furthermore, our ability to collect and report data may be delayed or interrupted by a number of factors, including access to the Internet, the failure of our network or software systems, security breaches or significant variability in visitor traffic on customer websites. In addition, computer viruses or other malware may harm our systems, causing us to lose data, and the transmission of computer viruses or other malware could expose us to litigation. We may also find, on occasion, that we cannot deliver data and reports to our customers in near real time because of a number of factors, including significant spikes in customer activity on their websites or failures of our network or software. If we supply inaccurate information or experience interruptions in our ability to capture, store and supply information in near real time or at all, our reputation could be harmed and we could lose customers, or we could be found liable for damages or incur other losses. We may not realize the anticipated benefits of past or future acquisitions, and integration of these acquisitions may disrupt our business and management. We may not realize the anticipated benefits of an acquisition of a company, division, product or technology, each of which involves numerous risks. These risks include: • difficulty in integrating the operations and personnel of the acquired company; • difficulty in effectively integrating the acquired technologies, products or services with our current technologies, products or services; • difficulty in maintaining controls, procedures and policies during the transition and integration; • entry into markets in which we have minimal prior experience and where competitors in such markets have stronger market positions; • disruption of our ongoing business and distraction of our management and other employees from other opportunities and challenges; • inability to retain personnel of the acquired business; • inability to retain key customers, distributors, vendors and other business partners of the acquired business; • inability to achieve the financial and strategic goals for the acquired and combined businesses; • inability to take advantage of anticipated tax benefits as a result of unforeseen difficulties in our integration activities; • incurring acquisition-related costs or amortization costs for acquired intangible assets that could impact our operating results; • potential elevated delinquency or bad debt write-offs related to receivables of the acquired business we assume; • potential additional exposure to fluctuations in currency exchange rates; • potential additional costs of bringing acquired companies into compliance with laws and regulations applicable to us as a multinational corporation; 22 Table of Contents • potential impairment of our relationships with employees, customers, partners, distributors or third-party providers of our technologies, products or services; • potential failure of our due diligence processes to identify significant problems, liabilities or other challenges of an acquired company or technology, including, but not limited to, issues with the acquired company’s intellectual property, product quality or product architecture, data back-up and security (including security from cyber-attacks), privacy practices, revenue recognition or other accounting practices, employee, customer or partner issues or legal and financial contingencies; • exposure to litigation or other claims in connection with, or inheritance of claims or litigation risk as a result of, an acquisition, including, but not limited to, claims from terminated employees, customers, former stockholders or other third parties; • incurring significant exit charges if products or services acquired in business combinations are unsuccessful; • potential inability to conclude that our internal controls over financial reporting are effective; • potential inability to obtain, or obtain in a timely manner, approvals from governmental authorities, which could delay or prevent such acquisitions; • the failure of strategic investments to perform as expected or to meet financial projections • potential delay in customer and distributor purchasing decisions due to uncertainty about the direction of our product and service offerings; and • potential incompatibility of business cultures. Mergers and acquisitions of high technology companies are inherently risky. If we do not complete an announced acquisition transaction or integrate an acquired business successfully and in a timely manner, we may not realize the benefits of the acquisition to the extent anticipated, and in certain circumstances an acquisition could harm our financial position. We may incur substantial costs enforcing or acquiring intellectual property rights and defending against third-party claims as a result of litigation or other proceedings. In connection with the enforcement of our own intellectual property rights, the acquisition of third-party intellectual property rights, or disputes relating to the validity or alleged infringement of third-party intellectual property rights, including patent rights, we have been, are currently and may in the future be subject to claims, negotiations and complex, protracted litigation. Intellectual property disputes and litigation are typically costly and can be disruptive to our business operations by diverting the attention and energies of management and key technical personnel. Although we have successfully defended or resolved many past lawsuits and other disputes, we may not prevail in every case in the future. Third-party intellectual property disputes, including those initiated by patent assertion entities, could subject us to significant liabilities, require us to enter into royalty and licensing arrangements on unfavorable terms, prevent us from licensing certain of our products or offering certain of our services, subject us to injunctions restricting our sale of products or services, cause severe disruptions to our operations or the markets in which we compete, or require us to satisfy indemnification commitments with our customers, including contractual provisions under various license arrangements and service agreements. In addition, we may incur significant costs in acquiring the necessary third-party intellectual property rights for use in our products, in some cases to fulfill contractual obligations with our customers. Any of these occurrences could significantly harm our business. Our intellectual property portfolio is a valuable asset and we may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights, including our source code, from infringement or unauthorized copying, use or disclosure. Our intellectual property portfolio is a valuable asset. Infringement or misappropriation of assets in this portfolio can result in lost revenues and thereby ultimately reduce their value. Preventing unauthorized use or infringement of our intellectual property rights is inherently difficult. We actively combat software piracy as we enforce our intellectual property rights, but we nonetheless lose significant revenue due to illegal use of our software. If piracy activities continue at historical levels or increase, they may further harm our business. Additionally, we take significant measures to protect the secrecy of our confidential information and trade secrets, including our source code. Despite these measures, as we have previously disclosed, hackers have managed to access certain of our source code and may obtain access in the future. If unauthorized disclosure of our source code occurs through security breach, cyberattack or otherwise, we could potentially lose future trade secret protection for that source code. The loss of future trade secret protection could make it easier for third parties to compete with our products by copying functionality, which could cause us to 23 Table of Contents lose customers and could adversely affect our revenue and operating margins. We also seek to protect our confidential information and trade secrets through the use of non-disclosure agreements with our customers, contractors, vendors and partners. However, there is a risk that our confidential information and trade secrets may be disclosed or published without our authorization, and in these situations, enforcing our rights may be difficult or costly. Increasing regulatory focus on privacy issues and expanding laws and regulations could impact our new business models and expose us to increased liability. Our industry is highly regulated, including for privacy and data security. We are also expanding our business in countries that have more stringent data protection laws than those in the United States, and such laws may be inconsistent across jurisdictions and are subject to evolving and differing interpretations. Privacy laws, including laws enforcing a “right to be forgotten” by consumers are changing and evolving globally. Governments, privacy advocates and class action attorneys are increasingly scrutinizing how companies collect, process, use, store, share and transmit personal data. New laws and industry self-regulatory codes have been enacted and more are being considered that may affect our ability to reach current and prospective customers, to understand how our products and services are being used, to respond to customer requests allowed under the laws, and to implement our new business models effectively. Any perception of our practices, products or services as an invasion of privacy, whether or not consistent with current regulations and industry practices, may subject us to public criticism, class action lawsuits, reputational harm or claims by regulators, industry groups or other third parties, all of which could disrupt our business and expose us to increased liability. Additionally, both laws regulating privacy, as well as third-party products purporting to address privacy concerns, could affect the functionality of and demand for our products and services, thereby harming our revenue. On behalf of certain customers, we collect and store anonymous and personal information derived from the activities of end users with various channels, including traditional websites, mobile websites and applications, email interactions, direct mail, point of sale, text messaging and call centers. Federal, state and foreign governments and agencies have adopted or are considering adopting laws regarding the collection, use and disclosure of this information. Our compliance with privacy laws and regulations and our reputation among consumers depend in part on our customers’ adherence to privacy laws and regulations and their use of our services in ways consistent with such consumers’ expectations. We also rely on contractual representations made to us by customers that their own use of our services and the information they provide to us via our services do not violate any applicable privacy laws, rules and regulations or their own privacy policies. We contractually obligate customers to represent to us that they provide their consumers the opportunity to “opt out” of the information collection associated with our services, as applicable. We do not formally audit such customers to confirm compliance with these representations. If these representations are false or if our customers do not otherwise comply with applicable privacy laws, we could face adverse publicity and possible legal or other regulatory action. In addition, some countries are considering enacting laws that would expand the scope of privacy-related obligations required of service providers, such as Adobe, that would require additional compliance expense and increased liability. In the past we have relied on the U.S.-European Union and the U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor Frameworks, as agreed to by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the European Union (“EU”) and Switzerland as a means to legally transfer European personal information from Europe to the United States. However, on October 6, 2015, the European Court of Justice invalidated the U.S.EU Safe Harbor framework and the Swiss data protection authorities later invalidated the U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor framework. As a result, we have been establishing alternate legitimate means of transferring personal data from the European Economic Area to the United States. The legitimacy of these alternate means are subject to differing interpretations among various European jurisdictions. The requirements or rulings of these jurisdictions may reduce demand for our services, restrict our ability to offer services in certain locations, impact our customers’ ability to deploy our solutions in Europe, or subject us to sanctions, including fines and a prohibition on data transfers, by EU data protection regulators. Furthermore, the European Court of Justice’s decision may result in different European data protection regulators applying differing standards for the transfer of personal data, which could result in increased regulation, cost of compliance and limitations on data transfer for us and our customers. These developments could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. We may incur losses associated with currency fluctuations and may not be able to effectively hedge our exposure. Because our products are distributed and used globally, our operating results are subject to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. We attempt to mitigate a portion of these risks through foreign currency hedging, based on our judgment of the appropriate trade-offs among risk, opportunity and expense. We have established a program to partially hedge our exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations for various currencies. We regularly review our hedging program and make adjustments as necessary based on the factors discussed above. Our hedging activities may not offset more than a portion of the adverse financial impact resulting from unfavorable movement in foreign currency exchange rates, which could adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. 24 Table of Contents If we fail to process transactions effectively, our revenue and earnings may be harmed. We process a significant volume of transactions on a daily basis in both our Digital Marketing and Digital Media businesses. Due to the size and volume of transactions that we handle, effective processing systems and controls are essential, but even the most sophisticated systems and processes may not be effective in preventing all errors. The systems supporting our business are comprised of multiple technology platforms that may be difficult to scale. If we are unable to effectively manage these systems and processes, we may be unable to process customer data in an accurate, reliable and timely manner, which may harm our customer relationships or results of operations. Failure to manage our sales and distribution channels and third-party customer service and technical support providers effectively could result in a loss of revenue and harm to our business. We contract with a number of software distributors, none of which is individually responsible for a material amount of our total net revenue for any recent period. If any single agreement with one of our distributors were terminated, any prolonged delay in securing a replacement distributor could have a negative impact on our results of operations. Successfully managing our indirect channel efforts to reach various customer segments for our products and services is a complex process across the broad range of geographies where we do business or plan to do business. Our distributors and other channel partners are independent businesses that we do not control. Notwithstanding the independence of our channel partners, we face potential legal risk and reputational harm from the activities of these third parties including, but not limited to, export control violations, workplace conditions, corruption and anti-competitive behavior. We cannot be certain that our distribution channel will continue to market or sell our products and services effectively. If our distribution channel is not successful, we may lose sales opportunities, customers and revenue. Our distributors also sell our competitors’ products and services, and if they favor our competitors’ products or services for any reason, they may fail to market our products or services effectively or to devote resources necessary to provide effective sales, which would cause our results to suffer. We also distribute some products and services through our OEM channel, and if our OEMs decide not to bundle our applications on their devices, our results could suffer. In addition, the financial health of our distributors and our continuing relationships with them are important to our success. Some of these distributors may be adversely impacted by changes to our business model or unable to withstand adverse changes in economic conditions, which could result in insolvency and/or the inability of such distributors to obtain credit to finance purchases of our products and services. In addition, weakness in the end-user market could negatively affect the cash flows of our distributors who could, in turn, delay paying their obligations to us, which would increase our credit risk exposure. Our business could be harmed if the financial condition of some of these distributors substantially weakened and we were unable to timely secure replacement distributors. We also sell certain of our products and services through our direct sales force. Risks associated with this sales channel include longer sales and collection cycles associated with direct sales efforts, challenges related to hiring, retaining and motivating our direct sales force, and substantial amounts of training for sales representatives, including regular updates to cover new and upgraded systems, products and services. Moreover, recent hires may not become as productive as we would like, as in most cases it takes a significant period of time before they achieve full productivity. Our business could be seriously harmed if our expansion efforts do not generate a corresponding significant increase in revenue and we are unable to achieve the efficiencies we anticipate. In addition, the loss of key sales employees could impact our customer relationships and future ability to sell to certain accounts covered by such employees. We also provide products and services, directly and indirectly, to a variety of government entities, both domestically and internationally. Risks associated with licensing and selling products and services to government entities include longer sales cycles, varying governmental budgeting processes and adherence to complex procurement regulations and other government-specific contractual requirements. Ineffectively managing these risks could result in various civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, payment of fines, and suspension or debarment from future government business, as well as harm to our reputation. We outsource a substantial portion of our customer service and technical support activities to third-party service providers. We rely heavily on these third-party customer service and technical support representatives working on our behalf, and we expect to continue to rely heavily on third parties in the future. This strategy provides us with lower operating costs and greater flexibility, but also presents risks to our business due to the fact that we may not be able to influence the quality of support as directly as we would be able to do if our own employees performed these activities. Our customers may react negatively to providing information to, and receiving support from, third-party organizations, especially if the third-party organizations are based overseas. If we encounter problems with our third-party customer service and technical support providers, our reputation may be harmed and we could lose customers and associated revenue. 25 Table of Contents Certain of our enterprise offerings have extended and complex sales cycles. Sales cycles for some of our enterprise offerings, including our Adobe Marketing Cloud Solutions and ETLAs in our Digital Media business, are multi-phased and complex. The complexity in these sales cycles is due to a number of factors, including: • the need for our sales representatives to educate customers about the use and benefit of our large-scale deployments of our products and services, including technical capabilities, security features, potential cost savings and return on investment; • the desire of large and medium size organizations to undertake significant evaluation processes to determine their technology requirements prior to making information technology expenditures; • the need for our representatives to spend a significant amount of time assisting potential customers in their testing and evaluation of our products and services; • the negotiation of large, complex, enterprise-wide contracts, as often required by our and our customers’ business and legal representatives; • the need for our customers to obtain requisition approvals from various decision makers within their organizations; and • customer budget constraints, economic conditions and unplanned administrative delays. We spend substantial time and expense on our sales efforts without any assurance that potential customers will ultimately purchase our solutions. As we target our sales efforts at larger enterprise customers, these trends are expected to continue and could have a greater impact on our results of operations. Additionally, our enterprise sales pattern has historically been uneven, where a higher percentage of a quarter’s total sales occur during the final weeks of each quarter, which is common in our industry. Our extended sales cycle for these products and services makes it difficult to predict when a given sales cycle will close. Catastrophic events may disrupt our business. We are a highly automated business and rely on our network infrastructure and enterprise applications, internal technology systems and our website for our development, marketing, operational, support, hosted services and sales activities. In addition, some of our businesses rely on third-party hosted services, and we do not control the operation of third-party data center facilities serving our customers from around the world, which increases our vulnerability. A disruption, infiltration or failure of these systems or third-party hosted services in the event of a major earthquake, fire, flood, tsunami or other weather event, power loss, telecommunications failure, software or hardware malfunctions, cyber-attack, war, terrorist attack or other catastrophic event could cause system interruptions, reputational harm, loss of intellectual property, delays in our product development, lengthy interruptions in our services, breaches of data security and loss of critical data. Any of these events could prevent us from fulfilling our customers’ orders or could negatively impact a country or region in which we sell our products, which could in turn decrease that country’s or region’s demand for our products. Our corporate headquarters, a significant portion of our research and development activities, certain of our data centers and certain other critical business operations are located in the San Francisco Bay Area, and additional facilities where we conduct significant operations are located in the Salt Lake Valley Area, both of which are near major earthquake faults. A catastrophic event that results in the destruction or disruption of any of our data centers or our critical business or information technology systems could severely affect our ability to conduct normal business operations and, as a result, our future operating results could be adversely affected. Climate change may have a long-term impact on our business. Access to clean water and reliable energy in the communities where we conduct our business, whether for our offices or for our vendors, is a priority. Our major sites in California and India are vulnerable to prolonged droughts due to climate change. While we seek to partner with organizations that mitigate their business risks associated with climate change, we recognize that there are inherent risks wherever business is conducted. In the event of a natural disaster that disrupts business due to limited access to these resources, Adobe has the potential to experience losses to our business, time required to recover, and added costs to resume operations. Additionally, climate change may pose regulatory and environmental challenges that affect where we locate our offices, who we partner with, and how we deliver products and services to our customers. 26 Table of Contents Net revenue, margin or earnings shortfalls or the volatility of the market generally may cause the market price of our stock to decline. The market price for our common stock has in the past experienced significant fluctuations and may do so in the future. A number of factors may affect the market price for our common stock, including: • shortfalls in our revenue, margins, earnings, the number of paid Creative Cloud and Document Cloud subscribers, Annualized Recurring Revenue (“ARR”), bookings within our Adobe Marketing Cloud business or other key performance metrics; • changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts; • whether our results meet analysts’ expectations • the announcement of new products and services, product enhancements or service introductions by us or our competitors; • the loss of large customers or our inability to increase sales to existing customers, retain customers or attract new customers; • variations in our or our competitors’ results of operations, changes in the competitive landscape generally and developments in our industry; and • unusual events such as significant acquisitions, divestitures, litigation, general socio-economic, regulatory, political or market conditions and other factors, including factors unrelated to our operating performance. We are subject to risks associated with compliance with laws and regulations globally which may harm our business. We are a global company subject to varied and complex laws, regulations and customs, both domestically and internationally. These laws and regulations relate to a number of aspects of our business, including trade protection, import and export control, data and transaction processing security, payment card industry data security standards, records management, user-generated content hosted on websites we operate, privacy practices, data residency, corporate governance, employee and third-party complaints, gift policies, conflicts of interest, employment and labor relations laws, securities regulations and other regulatory requirements affecting trade and investment. The application of these laws and regulations to our business is often unclear and may at times conflict. Compliance with these laws and regulations may involve significant costs or require changes in our business practices that result in reduced revenue and profitability. Non-compliance could also result in fines, damages, criminal sanctions against us, our officers or our employees, prohibitions on the conduct of our business, and damage to our reputation. We incur additional legal compliance costs associated with our global operations and could become subject to legal penalties if we fail to comply with local laws and regulations in U.S. jurisdictions or in foreign countries, which laws and regulations may be substantially different from those in the United States. In many foreign countries, particularly in those with developing economies, it is common to engage in business practices that are prohibited by U.S. regulations applicable to us, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. We cannot provide assurance that all of our employees, contractors and agents, as well as those companies to which we outsource certain of our business operations, including those based in or from countries where practices that violate such U.S. laws may be customary, will not take actions in violation of our internal policies. Any such violation could have an adverse effect on our business. We face various risks associated with our operating as a multinational corporation. As a global business that generates approximately 42% of our total revenue from sales to customers outside of the Americas, we are subject to a number of risks, including: • foreign currency fluctuations; • changes in government preferences for software procurement; • international and regional economic, political and labor conditions, including any instability or security concerns abroad; • tax laws (including U.S. taxes on foreign subsidiaries); • increased financial accounting and reporting burdens and complexities; • unexpected changes in, or impositions of, legislative or regulatory requirements; • changes in laws governing the free flow of data across international borders; 27 Table of Contents • failure of laws to protect our intellectual property rights adequately; • inadequate local infrastructure and difficulties in managing and staffing international operations; • delays resulting from difficulty in obtaining export licenses for certain technology, tariffs, quotas and other trade barriers; • the imposition of governmental economic sanctions on countries in which we do business or where we plan to expand our business; • operating in locations with a higher incidence of corruption and fraudulent business practices; and • other factors beyond our control, including terrorism, war, natural disasters and pandemics. If sales to any of our customers outside of the Americas are delayed or canceled because of any of the above factors, our revenue may decline. In addition, approximately 53% of our employees are located outside the United States. Accordingly, we are exposed to changes in laws governing our employee relationships in various U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, including laws and regulations regarding wage and hour requirements, fair labor standards, employee data privacy, unemployment tax rates, workers’ compensation rates, citizenship requirements and payroll and other taxes, which likely would have a direct impact on our operating costs. We may continue to expand our international operations and international sales and marketing activities. Expansion in international markets has required, and will continue to require, significant management attention and resources. We may be unable to scale our infrastructure effectively or as quickly as our competitors in these markets, and our revenue may not increase to offset these expected increases in costs and operating expenses, which would cause our results to suffer. We have issued $1.9 billion of notes in debt offerings and may incur other debt in the future, which may adversely affect our financial condition and future financial results. We have $1.9 billion in senior unsecured notes outstanding. We also have a $1 billion revolving credit facility, which is currently undrawn. This debt may adversely affect our financial condition and future financial results by, among other things: • requiring the dedication of a portion of our expected cash flow from operations to service our indebtedness, thereby reducing the amount of expected cash flow available for other purposes, including capital expenditures and acquisitions; and • limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and our industry. Our senior unsecured notes and revolving credit facility impose restrictions on us and require us to maintain compliance with specified covenants. Our ability to comply with these covenants may be affected by events beyond our control. If we breach any of the covenants and do not obtain a waiver from the lenders or noteholders, then, subject to applicable cure periods, any outstanding indebtedness may be declared immediately due and payable. In addition, changes by any rating agency to our credit rating may negatively impact the value and liquidity of both our debt and equity securities, as well as the potential costs associated with a refinancing of our debt. Under certain circumstances, if our credit ratings are downgraded or other negative action is taken, the interest rate payable by us under our revolving credit facility could increase. Downgrades in our credit ratings could also restrict our ability to obtain additional financing in the future and could affect the terms of any such financing. Changes in accounting principles, or interpretations thereof, could have a significant impact on our financial position and results of operations. We prepare our Consolidated Financial Statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). These principles are subject to interpretation by the SEC and various bodies formed to interpret and create appropriate accounting principles. A change in these principles can have a significant effect on our reported results and may even retroactively affect previously reported transactions. Additionally, the adoption of new or revised accounting principles may require that we make significant changes to our systems, processes and controls. For example, the U.S.-based Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) is currently working together with the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) on several projects to further align accounting principles and facilitate more comparable financial reporting between companies who are required to follow GAAP under SEC regulations and those who are required to follow International Financial Reporting Standards outside of the United States. These efforts by the FASB and IASB may result in different accounting principles under GAAP that may result in materially different financial results for us in areas including, but not limited to, principles for recognizing revenue and lease accounting. Additionally, significant changes to GAAP 28 Table of Contents resulting from the FASB’s and IASB’s efforts may require that we change how we process, analyze and report financial information and that we change financial reporting controls. It is not clear if or when these potential changes in accounting principles may become effective, whether we have the proper systems and controls in place to accommodate such changes and the impact that any such changes may have on our financial position and results of operations. If our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets become impaired we could be required to record a significant charge to earnings. Under GAAP, we review our goodwill and amortizable intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. GAAP requires us to test for goodwill impairment at least annually. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets may not be recoverable include declines in stock price, market capitalization or cash flows and slower growth rates in our industry. We could be required to record a significant charge to earnings in our financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets were determined, negatively impacting our results of operations. Changes in tax rules and regulations, or interpretations thereof, may adversely affect our effective tax rates. We are a U.S.-based multinational company subject to tax in multiple U.S. and foreign tax jurisdictions. A significant portion of our foreign earnings for the current fiscal year were earned by our Irish subsidiaries. In addition to providing for U.S. income taxes on earnings from the United States, we provide for U.S. income taxes on the earnings of foreign subsidiaries unless the subsidiaries’ earnings are considered permanently reinvested outside the United States. While we do not anticipate changing our intention regarding permanently reinvested earnings, if certain foreign earnings previously treated as permanently reinvested are repatriated, the related U.S. tax liability may be reduced by any foreign income taxes paid on these earnings. Our income tax expense has differed from the tax computed at the U.S. federal statutory income tax rate due primarily to discrete items and to earnings considered as permanently reinvested in foreign operations. Unanticipated changes in our tax rates could affect our future results of operations. Our future effective tax rates could be unfavorably affected by changes in the tax rates in jurisdictions where our income is earned, by changes in or our interpretation of tax rules and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we do business, by unanticipated decreases in the amount of earnings in countries with low statutory tax rates, or by changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities. The United States, countries in the EU and other countries where we do business have been considering changes in relevant tax, accounting and other laws, regulations and interpretations, including changes to tax laws applicable to corporate multinationals such as Adobe. These potential changes could adversely affect our effective tax rates or result in other costs to us. In addition, we are subject to the continual examination of our income tax returns by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and other domestic and foreign tax authorities, including a current examination by the IRS of our fiscal 2010, 2011 and 2012 tax returns. These tax examinations are expected to focus on our intercompany transfer pricing practices as well as other matters. We regularly assess the likelihood of outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes and have reserved for potential adjustments that may result from the current examinations. We cannot provide assurance that the final determination of any of these examinations will not have an adverse effect on our operating results and financial position. If we are unable to recruit and retain key personnel, our business may be harmed. Much of our future success depends on the continued service, availability and performance of our senior management. These individuals have acquired specialized knowledge and skills with respect to Adobe. The loss of any of these individuals could harm our business, especially in the event that we have not been successful in developing adequate succession plans. Our business is also dependent on our ability to retain, hire and motivate talented, highly skilled personnel across all levels of our organization. Experienced personnel in the information technology industry are in high demand and competition for their talents is intense in many areas where our employees are located. If we are unable to continue to successfully attract and retain key personnel, our business may be harmed. Effective succession planning is also a key factor for our long-term success. Our failure to enable the effective transfer of knowledge and facilitate smooth transitions of our key employees could adversely affect our long-term strategic planning and execution. We believe that a critical contributor to our success to date has been our corporate culture, which we have built to foster innovation, teamwork and employee satisfaction. As we grow, including from the integration of employees and businesses acquired in connection with previous or future acquisitions, we may find it difficult to maintain important aspects of our corporate culture, which could negatively affect our ability to retain and recruit personnel who are essential to our future success. 29 Table of Contents Our investment portfolio may become impaired by deterioration of the financial markets. Our cash equivalent and short-term investment portfolio as of November 27, 2015 consisted of corporate bonds and commercial paper, U.S. agency securities and U.S. Treasury securities, foreign government securities, money market mutual funds, municipal securities, time deposits and asset-backed securities. We follow an established investment policy and set of guidelines to monitor and help mitigate our exposure to interest rate and credit risk. The policy sets forth credit quality standards and limits our exposure to any one issuer, as well as our maximum exposure to various asset classes. Should financial market conditions worsen in the future, investments in some financial instruments may pose risks arising from market liquidity and credit concerns. In addition, any deterioration of the capital markets could cause our other income and expense to vary from expectations. As of November 27, 2015, we had no material impairment charges associated with our shortterm investment portfolio, and although we believe our current investment portfolio has little risk of material impairment, we cannot predict future market conditions or market liquidity, or credit availability, and can provide no assurance that our investment portfolio will remain materially unimpaired. ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS None. ITEM 2. PROPERTIES The following table sets forth the location, approximate square footage and use of each of the principal properties used by Adobe during fiscal 2015. We lease or sublease all of these properties with the exception of our property in Noida, India where we own the building and lease the land, in Lehi where we own the building and land, in San Francisco at 601 and 625 Townsend Street where we own the building and land, and our corporate offices in San Jose where we own the land and the East and West tower buildings and lease the Almaden Tower building. All leased properties are leased under operating leases. Such leases expire at various times through 2028, with the exception of our land lease in Noida, India that expires in 2091. The annual base rent expense (including operating expenses, property taxes and assessments, as applicable) for all leased facilities is currently approximately $87.3 million and is subject to annual adjustments as well as changes in interest rates. Location North America: West Tower, 345 Park Avenue San Jose, CA 95110, USA East Tower, 321 Park Avenue San Jose, CA 95110, USA Almaden Tower, 151 Almaden Boulevard San Jose, CA 95110, USA 601 and 625 Townsend Street San Francisco, CA 94103, USA 801 N. 34th Street-Waterfront Seattle, WA 98103, USA 410 Townsend Street San Francisco, CA 94107, USA 3900 Adobe Way Lehi, UT 84043, USA 7930 Jones Branch Drive McLean, VA 22102, USA 1540 Broadway New York, NY 10036, USA 343 Preston Street Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5N4, Canada 25100 NW Evergreen Rd Hillsboro, OR 97124, USA India: Adobe Towers, 1-1A, Sector 25A Noida, U.P. Approximate Square Footage Use 391,000 Research, product development, sales, marketing and administration Research, product development, sales, marketing and administration Product development, sales and administration 325,000 273,000 346,000 (1) 182,000 (2) 47,000 257,000 34,000 (3) 55,000 122,000 Research, product development, sales, marketing and administration Product development, sales, technical support and administration Research, product development, sales, marketing and administration Research, product development, sales, marketing and administration Sales and marketing Sales and marketing (4) 85,000 191,000 Research, product development, sales, marketing and administration Data center Product development and administration 30 Table of Contents Location Approximate Square Footage Use Tech Boulevard, Plot #6, Sector 127 Expressway, Noida, U.P. 107,000 Product development and administration Plot A3, A4 & A5, Sector 125 Noida, U.P. Salapuria Infinity #5 and #6 Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore Prestige Platina Technology Park Building 1, Block A Bangalore Japan: Gate City Osaki East Tower 1-11 Osaki Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo Romania: 26 Z Timisoara Blvd, Anchor Plaza Lujerului, Sector 6 Bucharest UK: Market House Providence Place Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 8AD Germany: Grosse Elbstrasse 27 Hamburg Georg-Brauchle-Ring No. 56/58 Munich 63,000 Product development and administration France: 18 rue Roger Simon-Barboux Arcueil, France 185,000 (5) Research, product development and administration 250,000 (5) Research, product development and administration 56,000 Product development, sales and marketing 71,000 Research and product development 49,000 Product development, sales, marketing and administration 36,000 Research and product development 39,000 Sales, marketing and administration 28,000 Product development, sales and administration _________________________________________ (1) The total square footage is 346,000, of which we occupy 273,000 square feet, or approximately 79% of this facility; 74,000 square feet is unoccupied basement space. (2) The total square footage is 182,000, of which we occupy 162,000 square feet, or approximately 89% of this facility. The remaining square footage is sublease. (3) The total square footage is 34,000, of which we occupy 30,000 square feet, or approximately 88% of this facility. The remaining square footage is subleased. (4) The total square footage is 122,000, of which we occupy 59,000 square feet, or approximately 48% of this facility; 6,000 square feet is unoccupied. The remaining square footage is subleased. (5) In June 2015, we transferred our Bangalore operations from the Salapuria Infinity property to the Prestige Platina Technology Park property. In general, all facilities are in good condition, suitable for the conduct of our business and are operating at an average capacity of approximately 75%. 31 Table of Contents ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS In connection with disputes relating to the validity or alleged infringement of third-party intellectual property rights, including patent rights, we have been, are currently and may in the future be subject to claims, negotiations or complex, protracted litigation. Intellectual property disputes and litigation may be very costly and can be disruptive to our business operations by diverting the attention and energies of management and key technical personnel. Although we have successfully defended or resolved past litigation and disputes, we may not prevail in any ongoing or future litigation and disputes. Third-party intellectual property disputes could subject us to significant liabilities, require us to enter into royalty and licensing arrangements on unfavorable terms, prevent us from licensing certain of our products or offering certain of our services, subject us to injunctions restricting our sale of products or services, cause severe disruptions to our operations or the markets in which we compete, or require us to satisfy indemnification commitments with our customers including contractual provisions under various license arrangements and service agreements. Between May 4, 2011 and July 14, 2011, five putative class action lawsuits were filed in Santa Clara Superior Court and Alameda Superior Court in California. On September 12, 2011, the cases were consolidated into In Re High-Tech Employee Antitrust Litigation (“HTEAL”) pending in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, San Jose Division. In the consolidated complaint, Plaintiffs alleged that Adobe, along with Apple, Google, Intel, Intuit, Lucasfilm and Pixar, agreed not to recruit each other’s employees in violation of Federal and state antitrust laws. Plaintiffs claim the alleged agreements suppressed employee compensation and deprived employees of career opportunities. Plaintiffs seek injunctive relief, monetary damages, treble damages, costs and attorneys fees. All defendants deny the allegations and that they engaged in any wrongdoing of any kind. On October 24, 2013, the court certified a class of all persons who worked in the technical, creative, and/or research and development fields on a salaried basis in the United States for one or more of the following: (a) Apple from March 2005 through December 2009; (b) Adobe from May 2005 through December 2009; (c) Google from March 2005 through December 2009; (d) Intel from March 2005 through December 2009; (e) Intuit from June 2007 through December 2009; (f) Lucasfilm from January 2005 through December 2009; or (g) Pixar from January 2005 through December 2009, excluding retail employees, corporate officers, members of the boards of directors, and senior executives of all defendants. During the first quarter of fiscal 2015, the parties reached an agreement to settle the litigation. In March 2015, the court granted preliminary approval of the settlement and on September 2, 2015, the court granted final approval of the settlement. We expect to incur no additional losses associated with this matter. In addition to intellectual property disputes, we are subject to legal proceedings, claims and investigations in the ordinary course of business, including claims relating to commercial, employment and other matters. Some of these disputes and legal proceedings may include speculative claims for substantial or indeterminate amounts of damages. We consider all claims on a quarterly basis in accordance with GAAP and based on known facts assess whether potential losses are considered reasonably possible, probable and estimable. Based upon this assessment, we then evaluate disclosure requirements and whether to accrue for such claims in our financial statements. This determination is then reviewed and discussed with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and our independent registered public accounting firm. We make a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Unless otherwise specifically disclosed in this note, we have determined that no provision for liability nor disclosure is required related to any claim against us because: (a) there is not a reasonable possibility that a loss exceeding amounts already recognized (if any) may be incurred with respect to such claim; (b) a reasonably possible loss or range of loss cannot be estimated; or (c) such estimate is immaterial. All legal costs associated with litigation are expensed as incurred. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against us. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be negatively affected by an unfavorable resolution of one or more of such proceedings, claims or investigations. In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through organizations such as the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other laws. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counterclaims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be negatively affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims. ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES Not applicable. 32 Table of Contents PART II ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES Market Information for Common Stock Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “ADBE.” The following table sets forth the high and low sales price per share of our common stock for the periods indicated. Price Range High Fiscal 2015: First Quarter Second Quarter Third Quarter Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year Fiscal 2014: First Quarter Second Quarter Third Quarter Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year Low $ $ $ $ $ 79.10 80.56 86.77 92.17 92.17 $ $ $ $ $ 69.74 72.97 74.27 75.99 69.74 $ $ $ $ $ 69.92 68.92 73.57 73.68 73.68 $ $ $ $ $ 53.99 58.63 64.09 60.88 53.99 Stockholders According to the records of our transfer agent, there were 1,215 holders of record of our common stock on January 15, 2016. Because many of such shares are held by brokers and other institutions on behalf of stockholders, we are unable to estimate the total number of stockholders represented by these record holders. Dividends We did not declare or pay any cash dividends on our common stock during fiscal 2015 or fiscal 2014. Under the terms of our credit agreement and lease agreements, we are not prohibited from paying cash dividends unless payment would trigger an event of default or one currently exists. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities Below is a summary of stock repurchases for the three months ended November 27, 2015. See Note 13 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding our stock repurchase programs. Period Average Price Per Share Total Number of Shares Repurchased Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans Approximate Dollar Value that May Yet be Purchased Under the Plan(1) (in thousands, except average price per share) Beginning repurchase authority August 29—September 25, 2015 Shares repurchased September 26—October 23, 2015 Shares repurchased October 24—November 27, 2015 Shares repurchased Total $ 1,734,851 440 $ 79.11 440 $ (34,851) 532 $ 83.60 532 $ (44,492) (2) 475 1,447 $ 89.10 475 1,447 $ $ (42,282) 1,613,226 (2) _________________________________________ 33 Table of Contents (1) In January 2015, the Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program granting authority to repurchase up to $2 billion in common stock through the end of fiscal 2017. The new stock repurchase program approved by our Board of Directors is similar to our previous $2 billion repurchase program. (2) In September 2015, as part of our stock repurchase program, we entered into a structured stock repurchase agreement with a large financial institution whereupon we provided them with a prepayment of $125.0 million. As of November 27, 2015, approximately $38.2 million of the prepayment remained under this agreement. ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA The following selected consolidated financial data (presented in thousands, except per share amounts and employee data) is derived from our Consolidated Financial Statements. As our operating results are not necessarily indicative of future operating results, this data should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto, and with Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. Fiscal Years Operations: Revenue Gross profit Income before income taxes Net income Net income per share: Basic Diluted Shares used to compute basic net income per share Shares used to compute diluted net income per share Cash dividends declared per common share Financial position:(1) Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments Working capital(2) Total assets Debt and capital lease obligations, non-current Stockholders’ equity Additional data: Worldwide employees 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 $ 4,795,511 $ 4,051,194 $ 873,781 $ 629,551 $ 4,147,065 $ 3,524,985 $ 361,376 $ 268,395 $ 4,055,240 $ 3,468,683 $ 356,141 $ 289,985 $ 4,403,677 $ 3,919,895 $ 1,118,794 $ 832,775 $4,216,258 $3,778,385 $1,035,230 $ 832,847 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1.26 1.24 498,764 507,164 — $ 0.54 0.53 497,867 508,480 — $ 0.58 0.56 501,372 513,476 — $ 1.68 1.66 494,731 502,721 — 1.67 1.65 497,469 503,921 $ — $ 3,988,084 $ 2,608,336 $11,726,472 $ 1,907,231 $ 7,001,580 $ 3,739,491 $ 2,107,893 $10,785,829 $ 911,086 $ 6,775,905 $ 3,173,752 $ 2,520,281 $10,380,298 $ 1,499,297 $ 6,724,634 $ 3,538,353 $ 3,125,314 $10,040,229 $ 1,496,938 $ 6,665,182 $2,911,692 $2,520,672 $8,991,183 $1,505,096 $5,783,113 13,893 12,499 11,847 11,144 9,925 _________________________________________ (1) Information associated with our financial position is as of the Friday closest to November 30 for the five fiscal periods through 2015. (2) For fiscal 2015, our working capital includes the effects of the adoption of ASU No. 2015-17, Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes, requiring all deferred tax assets and liabilities and any related valuation allowance to be classified as noncurrent on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Prior periods were not retrospectively adjusted. 34 Table of Contents ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto. ACQUISITIONS During fiscal 2015, we completed our acquisition of privately held Fotolia, a leading marketplace for royalty-free photos, images, graphics and HD videos, for $807.5 million. During fiscal 2015, we integrated Fotolia into our Digital Media reportable segment. During fiscal 2013, we completed our acquisitions of privately held Neolane, a leader in cross-channel campaign management technology for $616.7 million, and privately held Behance, an online social media platform to showcase and discover creative work for $111.1 million. During fiscal 2013, we integrated Neolane and Behance into our Digital Marketing and Digital Media reportable segments, respectively. We also completed other immaterial business acquisitions during the fiscal years presented. Pro forma information has not been presented for any of our fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 acquisitions as the impact to our Consolidated Financial Statements was not material. See Note 2 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding these acquisitions. CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES In preparing our Consolidated Financial Statements in accordance with GAAP and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC, we make assumptions, judgments and estimates that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. We base our assumptions, judgments and estimates on historical experience and various other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. On a regular basis, we evaluate our assumptions, judgments and estimates. We also discuss our critical accounting policies and estimates with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors. We believe that the assumptions, judgments and estimates involved in the accounting for revenue recognition, business combinations, goodwill impairment and income taxes have the greatest potential impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements. These areas are key components of our results of operations and are based on complex rules requiring us to make judgments and estimates, so we consider these to be our critical accounting policies. Historically, our assumptions, judgments and estimates relative to our critical accounting policies have not differed materially from actual results. Revenue Recognition Our revenue is derived from the licensing of subscription, perpetual and time-based software products, associated software maintenance and support plans, non-software related hosted services, consulting services, training and technical support. We recognize revenue when all four revenue recognition criteria have been met: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, we have delivered the product or performed the service, the fee is fixed or determinable and collection is probable. Determining whether and when some of these criteria have been satisfied often involves assumptions and judgments that can have a significant impact on the timing and amount of revenue we report. We enter into multiple element revenue arrangements in which a customer may purchase a combination of software, upgrades, maintenance and support, hosted services and consulting. For our software and software-related multiple element arrangements, we must: (1) determine whether and when each element has been delivered; (2) determine whether undelivered products or services are essential to the functionality of the delivered products and services; (3) determine the fair value of each undelivered element using vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”); and (4) allocate the total price among the various elements. VSOE of fair value is used to allocate a portion of the price to the undelivered elements and the residual method is used to allocate the remaining portion to the delivered elements. Absent VSOE, revenue is deferred until the earlier of the point at which VSOE of fair value exists for any undelivered element or until all elements of the arrangement have been delivered. However, if the only undelivered element is maintenance and support, the entire arrangement fee is recognized ratably over the performance period. Changes in assumptions or judgments or changes to the elements in a software arrangement could cause a material increase or decrease in the amount of revenue that we report in a particular period. 35 Table of Contents We determine VSOE for each element based on historical stand-alone sales to third parties or from the stated renewal rate for the elements contained in the initial arrangement. In determining VSOE, we require that a substantial majority of the selling prices for a product or service fall within a reasonably narrow pricing range. We have established VSOE for our software maintenance and support services, custom software development services, consulting services and training, when such services are sold optionally with software licenses. For multiple-element arrangements containing our non-software services, we must: (1) determine whether and when each element has been delivered; (2) determine the fair value of each element using the selling price hierarchy of VSOE of selling price, third-party evidence (“TPE”) of selling price or best-estimated selling price (“BESP”), as applicable; and (3) allocate the total price among the various elements based on the relative selling price method. For multiple-element arrangements that contain both software and non-software elements, we allocate revenue to software or software-related elements as a group and any non-software elements separately based on the selling price hierarchy. We determine the selling price for each deliverable using VSOE of selling price, if it exists, or TPE of selling price. If neither VSOE nor TPE of selling price exist for a deliverable, we use BESP. Once revenue is allocated to software or software-related elements as a group, we recognize revenue in conformance with software revenue accounting guidance. Revenue is recognized when revenue recognition criteria are met for each element. We are generally unable to establish VSOE or TPE for non-software elements and as such, we use BESP. BESP is generally used for offerings that are not typically sold on a stand-alone basis or for new or highly customized offerings. We determine BESP for a product or service by considering multiple factors including, but not limited to, major product groupings, geographies, market conditions, competitive landscape, internal costs, gross margin objectives and pricing practices. Pricing practices taken into consideration include historic contractually stated prices, volume discounts where applicable and our price lists. We must estimate certain royalty revenue amounts due to the timing of securing information from our customers. While we believe we can make reliable estimates regarding these matters, these estimates are inherently subjective. Accordingly, our assumptions and judgments regarding future products and services as well as our estimates of royalty revenue could differ from actual events, thus materially impacting our financial position and results of operations. Product revenue is recognized when the above criteria are met. We reduce the revenue recognized for estimated future returns, price protection and rebates at the time the related revenue is recorded. In determining our estimate for returns and in accordance with our internal policy regarding global channel inventory which is used to determine the level of product held by our distributors on which we have recognized revenue, we rely upon historical data, the estimated amount of product inventory in our distribution channel, the rate at which our product sells through to the end user, product plans and other factors. Our estimated provisions for returns can vary from what actually occurs. Product returns may be more or less than what was estimated. The amount of inventory in the channel could be different than what is estimated. Our estimate of the rate of sell-through for product in the channel could be different than what actually occurs. There could be a delay in the release of our products. These factors and unanticipated changes in the economic and industry environment could make our return estimates differ from actual returns, thus impacting our financial position and results of operations. In the future, actual returns and price protection may exceed our estimates as unsold products in the distribution channels are exposed to rapid changes in consumer preferences, market conditions or technological obsolescence due to new platforms, product updates or competing products. While we believe we can make reliable estimates regarding these matters, these estimates are inherently subjective. Accordingly, if our estimates change, our returns and price protection reserves would change, which would impact the total net revenue we report. We recognize revenue for hosted services that are based on a committed number of transactions ratably beginning on the date the services are first made available to the customer and continuing through the end of the contractual service term. Overusage fees, and fees billed based on the actual number of transactions from which we capture data, are billed in accordance with contract terms as these fees are incurred. We record amounts that have been invoiced in accounts receivable and in deferred revenue or revenue, depending on whether the revenue recognition criteria have been met. Our consulting revenue is recognized on a time and materials basis and is measured monthly based on input measures, such as on hours incurred to date compared to total estimated hours to complete, with consideration given to output measures, such as contract milestones, when applicable. Business Combinations We allocate the purchase price of acquired companies to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed, assumed equity awards, as well as to in-process research and development based upon their estimated fair values at the acquisition 36 Table of Contents date. The purchase price allocation process requires management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially at the acquisition date with respect to intangible assets, deferred revenue obligations and equity assumed. Although we believe the assumptions and estimates we have made are reasonable, they are based in part on historical experience and information obtained from the management of the acquired companies and are inherently uncertain. Examples of critical estimates in valuing certain of the intangible assets we have acquired or may acquire in the future include but are not limited to: • future expected cash flows from software license sales, subscriptions, support agreements, consulting contracts and acquired developed technologies and patents; • expected costs to develop the in-process research and development into commercially viable products and estimated cash flows from the projects when completed; • the acquired company’s trade name and trademarks as well as assumptions about the period of time the acquired trade name and trademarks will continue to be used in the combined company’s product portfolio; and • discount rates. In connection with the purchase price allocations for our acquisitions, we estimate the fair value of the deferred revenue obligations assumed. The estimated fair value of the support obligations is determined utilizing a cost build-up approach. The cost build-up approach determines fair value by estimating the costs related to fulfilling the obligations plus a normal profit margin. The estimated costs to fulfill the obligations are based on the historical costs related to fulfilling the obligations. In connection with the purchase price allocations for our acquisitions, we estimate the fair value of the equity awards assumed. The estimated fair value is determined utilizing a modified binomial option pricing model which assumes employees exercise their stock options when the share price exceeds the strike price by a certain dollar threshold. If the acquired company has significant historical data on their employee’s exercise behavior, then this threshold is determined based upon the acquired company’s history. Otherwise, our historical exercise experience is used to determine the exercise threshold. Zero coupon yields implied by U.S. Treasury issuances, implied volatility for our common stock and our historical forfeiture rate are other inputs to the binomial model. Unanticipated events and circumstances may occur which may affect the accuracy or validity of such assumptions, estimates or actual results. Goodwill Impairment We complete our goodwill impairment test on an annual basis, during the second quarter of our fiscal year, or more frequently, if changes in facts and circumstances indicate that an impairment in the value of goodwill recorded on our balance sheet may exist. In order to estimate the fair value of goodwill, we typically estimate future revenue, consider market factors and estimate our future cash flows. Based on these key assumptions, judgments and estimates, we determine whether we need to record an impairment charge to reduce the value of the asset carried on our balance sheet to its estimated fair value. Assumptions, judgments and estimates about future values are complex and often subjective. They can be affected by a variety of factors, including external factors such as industry and economic trends, and internal factors such as changes in our business strategy or our internal forecasts. Although we believe the assumptions, judgments and estimates we have made in the past have been reasonable and appropriate, different assumptions, judgments and estimates could materially affect our reported financial results. We completed our annual impairment test in the second quarter of fiscal 2015 and determined there was no impairment. The results of our annual impairment test indicate that the fair values of our reporting units are significantly in excess of their carrying values. Accounting for Income Taxes We use the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under this method, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of taxes payable or refundable for the current year. In addition, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carryforwards. Management must make assumptions, judgments and estimates to determine our current provision for income taxes and also our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance to be recorded against a deferred tax asset. Our assumptions, judgments and estimates relative to the current provision for income taxes take into account current tax laws, our interpretation of current tax laws and possible outcomes of current and future audits conducted by foreign and domestic 37 Table of Contents tax authorities. We have established reserves for income taxes to address potential exposures involving tax positions that could be challenged by tax authorities. In addition, we are subject to the continual examination of our income tax returns by the IRS and other domestic and foreign tax authorities, including a current examination by the IRS of our fiscal 2010, 2011 and 2012 tax returns. We expect future examinations to focus on our intercompany transfer pricing practices as well as other matters. We regularly assess the likelihood of outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes and have reserved for potential adjustments that may result from the current examinations. We believe such estimates to be reasonable; however, the final determination of any of these examinations could significantly impact the amounts provided for income taxes in our Consolidated Financial Statements. Our assumptions, judgments and estimates relative to the value of a deferred tax asset take into account predictions of the amount and category of future taxable income, such as income from operations or capital gains income. Actual operating results and the underlying amount and category of income in future years could render our current assumptions, judgments and estimates of recoverable net deferred taxes inaccurate. Any of the assumptions, judgments and estimates mentioned above could cause our actual income tax obligations to differ from our estimates, thus materially impacting our financial position and results of operations. We are a United States-based multinational company subject to tax in multiple U.S. and foreign tax jurisdictions. A significant portion of our foreign earnings for the current fiscal year were earned by our Irish subsidiaries. In addition to providing for U.S. income taxes on earnings from the United States, we provide for U.S. income taxes on the earnings of foreign subsidiaries unless the subsidiaries’ earnings are considered permanently reinvested outside the United States. While we do not anticipate changing our intention regarding permanently reinvested earnings, if certain foreign earnings previously treated as permanently reinvested are repatriated, the related U.S. tax liability may be reduced by any foreign income taxes paid on these earnings. Our income tax expense has differed from the tax computed at the U.S. federal statutory income tax rate due primarily to discrete items and to earnings considered as permanently reinvested in foreign operations. Unanticipated changes in our tax rates could affect our future results of operations. Our future effective tax rates could be unfavorably affected by changes in the tax rates in jurisdictions where our income is earned, by changes in, or our interpretation of, tax rules and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we do business, by unanticipated decreases in the amount of earnings in countries with low statutory tax rates, or by changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities. The United States, countries in the European Union and other countries where we do business have been considering changes in relevant tax, accounting and other laws, regulations and interpretations, including changes to tax laws applicable to corporate multinationals such as Adobe. These potential changes could adversely affect our effective tax rates or result in other costs to us. Recent Accounting Pronouncements On November 20, 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU No. 2015-17, Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes, requiring all deferred tax assets and liabilities, and any related valuation allowance, to be classified as non-current on the balance sheet. The classification change for all deferred taxes as non-current simplifies entities’ processes as it eliminates the need to separately identify the net current and net non-current deferred tax asset or liability in each jurisdiction and allocate valuation allowances. We elected to prospectively adopt the accounting standard in the beginning of our fourth quarter of fiscal 2015. Prior periods in our Consolidated Financial Statements were not retrospectively adjusted. Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Effective On May 28, 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, requiring an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The updated standard will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective and permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Deferral of the Effective Date, which deferred the effective date of the new revenue standard for periods beginning after December 15, 2016 to December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted but not earlier than the original effective date. Accordingly, the updated standard is effective for us in the first quarter of fiscal 2019. We have not yet selected a transition method and we are currently evaluating the effect that the updated standard will have on our Consolidated Financial Statements and related disclosures. With the exception of the new revenue standard discussed above, there have been no new accounting pronouncements not yet effective that have significance, or potential significance, to our Consolidated Financial Statements. 38 Table of Contents RESULTS OF OPERATIONS Overview of 2015 For fiscal 2015, we reported financial results consistent with the continued execution of our long-term plans for our two strategic growth areas, Digital Media and Digital Marketing, while continuing to market and license a broad portfolio of products and solutions. In our Digital Media segment, we are a market leader with Adobe Creative Cloud, our subscription-based offering for creating and publishing content and applications. Creative Cloud, first delivered in May 2012, is our next-generation offering that supersedes our historical model of licensing our creative products with perpetual licenses. Creative Cloud delivers value through more frequent product updates, storage and access to user files stored in the cloud with syncing of files across users' machines, access to marketplace, social and community-based features with our Adobe Stock and Behance services, app creation capabilities and lower entry point pricing for cost-sensitive customers. We offer Creative Cloud for individuals and for teams, and we enable larger enterprise customers to acquire Creative Cloud capabilities through Enterprise Term License Agreements (“ETLAs”). The three Creative Cloud offerings address the multiple routes to market we use to license our creative software to targeted customers. Adoption of Creative Cloud has transformed our business model, and we continue to expect this to drive higher long-term revenue growth through an expansion of our customer base by acquiring new users through a lower cost of entry and delivery of additional features and value, as well as keeping existing customers current on our latest release. We have also built out a marketplace for Creative Cloud subscribers, most notably with our acquisition of Fotolia in January of 2015, to enable the delivery and purchase of stock assets in our new service called Adobe Stock. Overall, our strategy with Creative Cloud is designed to enable us to increase our revenue with users, attract more new customers, and shift our revenue to be more recurring and predictable as revenue is recognized ratably. We continue to implement strategies that will accelerate awareness, consideration and purchase of subscriptions to our Creative Cloud offering. These strategies include increasing the value Creative Cloud users receive such as offering new mobile applications, as well as targeted promotions and offers that attract past customers and potential users to try out and ultimately subscribe to Creative Cloud. Because of the shift towards Creative Cloud subscriptions and ETLAs, perpetual revenue for older Creative products has continued to decline, and revenue from perpetual licensing of these products was immaterial for fiscal 2015. We are also a market leader with our Document Cloud offerings built around our Acrobat family of products, the Adobe Reader DC and a set of integrated cloud-based document services, including Adobe eSign. Adobe Acrobat provides reliable creation and exchange of electronic documents, regardless of platform or application source type. In the second quarter of fiscal 2015, we delivered the next generation of this offering called Adobe Document Cloud, which we believe enhances the way people manage critical documents at home, in the office and across devices. Adobe Document Cloud includes all-new Adobe Acrobat DC and Adobe eSign releases and a set of integrated services enable users to create, review, approve, sign and track documents whether on a desktop or mobile device. Acrobat DC, with a touch-enabled user interface, is licensed both through subscription and perpetual pricing. Annualized Recurring Revenue (“ARR”) is currently our key performance metric to assess the health and trajectory of our overall Digital Media segment. ARR should be viewed independently of revenue, deferred revenue and unbilled deferred revenue as ARR is a performance metric and is not intended to be combined with any of these items. We plan to adjust our reported ARR on an annual basis to reflect any material exchange rates changes. We calculate ARR as follows: Creative ARR Annual Value of Creative Cloud Subscriptions and Services + Annual Digital Publishing Suite Contract Value + Annual Creative ETLA Contract Value Document Cloud ARR Annual Value of Document Cloud Subscriptions and Services + Annual Document Cloud ETLA Contract Value Digital Media ARR Creative ARR + Document Cloud ARR 39 Table of Contents Total Creative ARR exiting fiscal 2015 was $2.60 billion, up from $1.61 billion at the end of fiscal 2014. We exited fiscal 2015 with 6.167 million paid Creative Cloud subscriptions, up 78% from 3.458 million at the end of fiscal 2014. Our Digital Media segment also includes our Document Cloud products and solutions, including our newly released Acrobat DC product which helped grow Document Cloud ARR to $397 million exiting fiscal 2015, up from $265 million at the end of fiscal 2014. Total Digital Media ARR grew to approximately $3.00 billion at the end of fiscal 2015, up from $1.88 billion at the end of fiscal 2014, demonstrating the progress we have made with the transformation of our business to a more recurring, ratable and predictable revenue model. Our reported ARR results in fiscal 2015 are based on currency rates set at the start of fiscal 2015 and held constant throughout the year. Revaluing our ending ARR for fiscal 2015 using currency rates at the beginning of fiscal 2016, our Digital Media ARR at the end of fiscal 2015 would be $2.88 billion or approximately $114 million lower than the ARR reported above. We are a market leader in the fast-growing category addressed by our Digital Marketing segment. Our Adobe Marketing Cloud now includes eight solutions which address the expanding needs of marketers. In fiscal 2015, we achieved record Marketing Cloud revenue of $1.36 billion, which represents 16% year-over-year revenue growth. In addition, we drove strong demand and bookings growth for our Marketing Cloud solutions, which we expect will positively benefit revenue growth in future quarters. Financial Performance Summary for Fiscal 2015 • During fiscal 2015, our subscription revenue as a percentage of total revenue increased to 67% from 50% compared with fiscal 2014, as we transitioned more of our business to a subscription-based model. • Total Digital Media ARR of approximately $3.00 billion as of November 27, 2015 increased by $1.12 billion, or 60%, from $1.88 billion as of November 28, 2014. The change in our Digital Media ARR was primarily due to increases in the number of paid Creative Cloud individual and team subscriptions and continued adoption of our ETLAs, and to a lesser extent, the adoption of our Document Cloud offering through our ETLAs and increases in Document Cloud subscriptions. • Adobe Marketing Cloud revenue of $1.36 billion increased by $188.5 million, or 16%, during fiscal 2015, from $1.17 billion in fiscal 2014. The increases were primarily due to continued adoption of our Adobe Experience Manager (“AEM”) offering and increases in Adobe Campaign and Adobe Analytics revenue. • Our total deferred revenue of $1.49 billion as of November 27, 2015 increased by $330.0 million, or 29%, from $1.16 billion as of November 28, 2014, primarily due to increases in Creative Cloud individual and team subscriptions, ETLAs and new contracts and existing renewals for our Adobe Marketing Cloud services. Also contributing to the increase in deferred revenue were the increases associated with our stock photography offering from the acquisition of Fotolia in fiscal 2015. • Cost of revenue of $744.3 million increased by $122.2 million, or 20%, during fiscal 2015, from $622.1 million in fiscal 2014. The increases were primarily due to increases in costs associated with compensation and related benefits driven by additional headcount and costs of professional services driven by the increase in our professional services business. • Operating expenses of $3.15 billion increased by $35.8 million during fiscal 2015, from $3.11 billion in fiscal 2014. The increase is due to higher costs associated with compensation and related benefits driven by additional headcount and amortization of intangibles from the Fotolia acquisition in fiscal 2015. • Net income of $629.6 million increased by $361.2 million, or 135%, during fiscal 2015 from $268.4 million in fiscal 2014 primarily due to revenue growth. • Net cash flow from operations of $1.47 billion during fiscal 2015 increased by $182.0 million, or 14%, from $1.29 billion during fiscal 2014 primarily due to higher net income. 40 Table of Contents Revenue (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Subscription Percentage of total revenue Product Percentage of total revenue Services and support Percentage of total revenue Total revenue Fiscal 2014 Fiscal 2013 $ 3,223.9 $ 2,076.6 $ 1,137.9 67% 50% 28% 1,125.1 1,627.8 2,470.1 24% 39% 61% 446.5 442.7 447.2 9% 11% 11% $ 4,795.5 $ 4,147.1 $ 4,055.2 % Change 2015-2014 % Change 2014-2013 55 % 82 % (31)% (34)% 1% (1)% 16 % 2% Our subscription revenue is comprised primarily of fees we charge for our subscription and hosted service offerings including Creative Cloud and certain of our Adobe Marketing Cloud and Document Cloud services. We recognize subscription revenue ratably over the term of agreements with our customers, beginning with commencement of the service. We expect our subscription revenue will continue to increase as a result of our investments in new software-as-a-service (“SaaS”) and subscription models. We have the following reportable segments—Digital Media, Digital Marketing and Print and Publishing. Subscription revenue by reportable segment for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 is as follows (dollars in millions): Fiscal 2015 Digital Media Digital Marketing Print and Publishing Total subscription revenue $ $ 2,264.7 937.0 22.2 3,223.9 Fiscal 2014 $ $ 1,268.3 797.5 10.8 2,076.6 Fiscal 2013 $ $ 471.9 663.1 2.9 1,137.9 % Change 2015-2014 79% 17% * 55% % Change 2014-2013 169% 20% * 82% _________________________________________ (*) Percentage is not meaningful. Our services and support revenue is comprised of consulting, training and maintenance and support, primarily related to the licensing of our enterprise, developer and platform products and the sale of our hosted Adobe Marketing Cloud services. Our support revenue also includes technical support and developer support to partners and developer organizations related to our desktop products. Our maintenance and support offerings, which entitle customers to receive desktop product upgrades and enhancements or technical support, depending on the offering, are generally recognized ratably over the term of the arrangement. Segments In fiscal 2015, we categorized our products into the following reportable segments: • Digital Media—Our Digital Media segment provides tools and solutions that enable individuals, small and medium businesses and enterprises to create, publish, promote and monetize their digital content anywhere. Our customers include traditional content creators, web application developers and digital media professionals, as well as their management in marketing departments and agencies, companies and publishers. Our customers also include knowledge workers who create, collaborate and distribute documents. • Digital Marketing—Our Digital Marketing segment provides solutions and services for how digital advertising and marketing are created, managed, executed, measured and optimized. Our customers include digital marketers, advertisers, publishers, merchandisers, web analysts, chief marketing officers, chief information officers and chief revenue officers. • Print and Publishing—Our Print and Publishing segment addresses market opportunities ranging from the diverse authoring and publishing needs of technical and business publishing to our legacy type and OEM printing businesses. 41 Table of Contents Segment Information (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Digital Media Percentage of total revenue Digital Marketing Percentage of total revenue Print and Publishing Percentage of total revenue Total revenue Fiscal 2014 Fiscal 2013 % Change 2015-2014 $ 3,095.2 $ 2,603.2 $ 2,625.9 65% 63% 65% 1,508.9 1,355.2 1,228.8 31% 33% 30% 191.4 188.7 200.5 4% 4% 5% $ 4,795.5 $ 4,147.1 $ 4,055.2 % Change 2014-2013 19% (1)% 11% 10 % 1% (6)% 16% 2% Fiscal 2015 Revenue Compared to Fiscal 2014 Revenue Digital Media Revenue from Digital Media increased $492.0 million during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014, primarily driven by increases in revenue associated with our creative offerings due to continued strong adoption of Creative Cloud. Document Cloud revenue remained stable during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014. Creative revenue, which includes our Creative Cloud and perpetual creative offerings, increased during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014, primarily due to the increase in subscription revenue associated with our Creative Cloud offerings driven by the increase in number of paid Creative Cloud team, individual and enterprise subscriptions. The increases associated with our creative products were offset in part by expected declines in revenue associated with our perpetual creative offerings. Document Cloud revenue, which includes our Acrobat product family, remained stable during fiscal 2015 as compared to the year ago period, as increases in revenue associated with eSign and our Document Cloud subscription offering were offset by decreases in revenue associated with our Document Cloud perpetual license offerings. Driving the increase in our Document Cloud subscription revenue was the adoption of our cloud offering through subscriptions and ETLAs. Digital Marketing Revenue from Digital Marketing increased $153.7 million during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to continued revenue growth associated with our Adobe Marketing Cloud, which increased 16% as compared with the year-ago period. Contributing to this increase was the continued adoption of our AEM term-based offering, and to a lesser extent, increases in revenue associated with Adobe Campaign, Adobe Analytics and Adobe Target. Print and Publishing Revenue from Print and Publishing remained stable during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014. Fiscal 2014 Revenue Compared to Fiscal 2013 Revenue Digital Media Revenue from Digital Media decreased slightly during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. The slight decrease was primarily driven by declines in revenue associated with our perpetual creative offerings, distribution of third-party software downloads and Hobbyist products launched in fiscal 2013. With respect to the Hobbyist product revenue decline, we began actively migrating customers to our Creative Cloud Photography Plan in fiscal 2014, for which revenue is recognized ratably. Largely offsetting these decreases were increases in Creative Cloud and Document Cloud revenue. Creative revenue, which includes our Creative Cloud, Creative Suite editions and CS point products, decreased slightly during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 due to decreases in revenue from CS point products and Creative Suite editions, as we discontinued the general availability of our perpetually licensed CS6 products in the second quarter of fiscal 2014. Also contributing to the decline in creative revenue were decreases in revenue associated with the distribution of third-party software downloads and Hobbyist products launched in fiscal 2013. Decreases were largely offset by increases in revenue from subscriptions and ETLAs and revenue from our Digital Publishing Suite. Document Cloud revenue, which includes our Acrobat product family, increased during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 primarily due to increases in our Document Cloud subscription revenue. Increases were slightly offset by decreases due to our continued shift to ETLAs. 42 Table of Contents Digital Marketing Revenue from Digital Marketing increased $126.3 million during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 due to continued revenue growth associated with our Adobe Marketing Cloud, which increased 15% during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. Contributing to this increase was Adobe Campaign and the strong adoption of AEM. Print and Publishing Revenue from Print and Publishing decreased during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 primarily due to decreases in legacy product revenue and increased ETLAs for certain products in this group. Geographical Information (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Americas Percentage of total revenue EMEA Percentage of total revenue APAC Percentage of total revenue Total revenue Fiscal 2014 Fiscal 2013 $ 2,788.1 $ 2,314.4 $ 2,134.4 58% 56% 53% 1,336.4 1,179.9 1,129.2 28% 28% 28% 671.0 652.8 791.6 14% 16% 19% $ 4,795.5 $ 4,147.1 $ 4,055.2 % Change 2015-2014 % Change 2014-2013 20% 8% 13% 4% 3% (18)% 16% 2% Fiscal 2015 Revenue by Geography Compared to Fiscal 2014 Revenue by Geography Revenue increased in the Americas and EMEA during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 while revenue in APAC remained stable during fiscal 2015 compared with the year-ago period. Revenue in the Americas and EMEA increased primarily due to growth in Digital Media and Digital Marketing revenue. The overall increase in EMEA revenue was slightly offset by declines due to strengthening of the U.S. Dollar against the Euro, British Pound and other EMEA currencies in fiscal 2015. Within the Americas and EMEA, fluctuations in revenue by reportable segment were attributable to the factors noted in the segment information above. Revenue in APAC remained stable during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 due to an increase in Digital Marketing revenue offset by a decrease in Digital Media revenue.The increase in Digital Marketing revenue in APAC was attributable to the factors noted in the segment information above. The decline in Digital Media revenue was primarily due to expected decreases in perpetual license revenue, partially offset by increases in subscription revenue during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014. Fiscal 2014 Revenue by Geography Compared to Fiscal 2013 Revenue by Geography Overall revenue increased in the Americas and EMEA during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. Revenue in the Americas increased due to growth in Digital Media and Digital Marketing revenue. Revenue in EMEA increased primarily due to growth in Digital Marketing revenue. Digital Media and Print and Publishing revenue in EMEA remained relatively stable. Despite strengthening of the U.S. Dollar against the Euro and the British Pound during the latter part of fiscal 2014, the overall weakening of the U.S. Dollar against these currencies during fiscal 2014 also caused revenue in EMEA to increase as compared to fiscal 2013. Within the Americas and EMEA, the fluctuations in revenue by reportable segment were attributable to the factors noted in the segment information above. Revenue in APAC decreased during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 primarily as a result of decreases in Digital Media revenue due to slower adoption of Creative Cloud in Japan compared to other countries and the strengthening of the U.S. Dollar against the Japanese Yen and other Asian currencies. Digital Marketing and Print and Publishing revenue in APAC remained relatively stable during fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. 43 Table of Contents Included in the overall change in revenue for fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014 were impacts associated with foreign currency as shown below. Our currency hedging program is used to mitigate a portion of the foreign currency impact to revenue. Fiscal 2015 (in millions) Revenue impact: Fiscal 2014 Increase/(Decrease) EMEA: Euro British Pound Other currencies Total EMEA Japanese Yen Other currencies Total revenue impact $ (104.3) $ (16.1) (12.3) (132.7) (35.0) (23.9) (191.6) 12.3 12.9 (0.2) 25.0 (25.7) (8.9) (9.6) Hedging impact: EMEA Japanese Yen 40.1 16.2 Total hedging impact Total impact $ 56.3 (135.3) $ 10.1 8.6 18.7 9.1 During fiscal 2015, the U.S. Dollar strengthened against the Euro, British Pound, Japanese Yen and other Asian currencies causing revenue in EMEA and APAC measured in U.S. Dollar equivalents to decrease as compared to fiscal 2014. These decreases were partially offset by hedging gains from our EMEA currencies and Japanese Yen hedging programs during fiscal 2015. During fiscal 2014, the U.S. Dollar strengthened against the Japanese Yen and other Asian currencies causing revenue in APAC measured in U.S. Dollar equivalents to decrease compared to fiscal 2013. This decrease was offset in part by the favorable impact to revenue measured in EMEA currencies as the U.S. Dollar weakened against the Euro and the British Pound for the majority of fiscal 2014. Our EMEA and Yen currency hedging programs resulted in hedging gains during fiscal 2014. See Note 18 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further geographic information. Product Backlog The actual amount of product backlog at any particular time may not be a meaningful indicator of future business prospects. Shippable backlog is comprised of unfulfilled orders, excluding those associated with new product releases, those pending credit review and those not shipped due to the application of our global inventory policy. We had minimal shippable backlog at the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014. We expect that our shippable backlog will continue to be insignificant in future periods. Deferred revenue on our consolidated balance sheet does not represent the total contract value of annual or multi-year, noncancelable commercial subscription agreements or government contracts with fiscal funding clauses. Unbilled deferred revenue represents expected future billings which are contractually committed under our existing subscription, SaaS and managed services agreements that have not been invoiced and are not recorded in deferred revenue within our financial statements. Our presentation of unbilled deferred revenue backlog may differ from that of other companies in the industry. As of November 27, 2015, we had unbilled deferred revenue backlog of approximately $2.89 billion of which approximately 40% to 50% is not reasonably expected to be billed during fiscal 2016. As of November 28, 2014, we had unbilled deferred revenue backlog of approximately $2.19 billion, which has been updated to include $433 million of individual annual subscriptions which were not captured in the prior year due to current year enhancements to our management reporting system. We expect that the amount of unbilled deferred revenue backlog will change from period to period due to certain factors, including the timing and duration of large customer subscription, SaaS and managed service agreements, varying billing cycles of these agreements, the timing of customer renewals, the timing of when unbilled deferred revenue backlog is to be billed, changes in customer financial circumstances and foreign currency fluctuations. Additionally, the unbilled deferred revenue backlog for multi-year subscription agreements that are billed annually is typically higher at the beginning of the contract period, lower prior to renewal and typically increases when the agreement is renewed. Accordingly, fluctuations in unbilled deferred revenue backlog may not be a reliable indicator of future business prospects and the related revenue associated with these contractual commitments. 44 Table of Contents Cost of Revenue (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Subscription Percentage of total revenue Product Percentage of total revenue Services and support Percentage of total revenue Total cost of revenue $ $ 409.2 $ 9% 90.0 2% 245.1 5% 744.3 $ Fiscal 2014 335.5 $ 8% 97.1 2% 189.5 5% 622.1 $ Fiscal 2013 % Change 2015-2014 278.1 7% 138.2 3% 170.3 4% 586.6 % Change 2014-2013 22 % 21 % (7)% (30)% 29 % 11 % 20 % 6% Subscription Cost of subscription revenue consists of third-party royalties and expenses related to operating our network infrastructure, including depreciation expenses and operating lease payments associated with computer equipment, data center costs, salaries and related expenses of network operations, implementation, account management and technical support personnel, amortization of intangible assets and allocated overhead. We enter into contracts with third parties for the use of their data center facilities and our data center costs largely consist of amounts we pay to these third parties for rack space, power and similar items. Cost of subscription revenue increased due to the following: % Change 2015-2014 Data center cost Compensation cost and related benefits associated with headcount Depreciation expense Royalty cost Amortization of purchased intangibles Various individually insignificant items Total change 4% 4 3 4 3 4 22% % Change 2014-2013 10% 4 3 3 — 1 21% Cost of subscription revenue increased during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to data center costs, compensation and related benefits, royalty cost, depreciation expense, and purchased intangible amortization. Data center costs increased primarily due to higher transaction volumes in our Adobe Marketing Cloud and Creative Cloud services. Depreciation expense increased primarily due to higher capital expenditures in recent periods as we continue to invest in our network and data center infrastructure to support the growth of our subscription and hosted services business. Royalty cost increased primarily due to increases in subscriptions and downloads of our SaaS offerings and increased royalties due to the introduction of our stock photography offering from our acquisition of Fotolia in fiscal 2015. Amortization of purchased intangibles increased primarily due to amortization of intangibles acquired from our acquisition of Fotolia in fiscal 2015. Cost of subscription revenue increased during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 primarily due to data center costs, compensation and related benefits, depreciation expense, and royalty cost. Data center costs increased primarily due to higher transaction volumes in our Adobe Marketing Cloud and Creative Cloud services. Compensation cost and related benefits increased primarily due to additional headcount in fiscal 2014, including from our acquisition of Neolane in the third quarter of fiscal 2013. Depreciation expense increased primarily due to higher capital expenditures as we continued to invest in our network and data center infrastructure to support the growth of our business. Royalty cost increased primarily due to increases in subscriptions and downloads of our SaaS offerings. Product Cost of product revenue includes product packaging, third-party royalties, excess and obsolete inventory, amortization related to localization costs, purchased intangibles and acquired rights to use technology and the costs associated with the manufacturing of our products. 45 Table of Contents Fluctuations in cost of product revenue are due to the following: % Change 2015-2014 Cost of sales Excess and obsolete inventory Amortization of purchased intangibles and technology license arrangements Royalty cost Various individually insignificant items Total change % Change 2014-2013 (3)% (4) (2) 3 (1) (7)% (4)% 1 (20) (2) (5) (30)% Cost of product revenue decreased during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to decreases in excess and obsolete inventory, cost of sales and amortization of purchased intangibles, partially offset by an increase in royalty cost. The increase in royalty cost was driven by royalty payments related to our stock photography perpetual offering from our acquisition of Fotolia in fiscal 2015. Cost of product revenue decreased during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 primarily due to decreases in amortization of purchased intangibles and technology license arrangements, cost of sales and royalty cost, slightly offset by an increase in excess and obsolete inventory. Amortization of purchased intangibles and technology license arrangements decreased as we entered into certain technology licensing arrangements for which payments of $26.5 million related to historical use of certain technology licensing arrangements were expensed as cost of product revenue during fiscal 2013. Cost of sales decreased due to decreases in the number of perpetual units sold and associated packaging costs as we continued to focus our development and sales efforts on Creative Cloud. Royalty cost decreased primarily due to decreases in revenue from our perpetual offerings. Excess and obsolete inventory increased as a result of changes in reserve requirements for CS6 shrink boxes as we discontinued the general availability of CS6 on a perpetual licensing basis. Services and Support Cost of services and support revenue is primarily comprised of employee-related costs and associated costs incurred to provide consulting services, training and product support. Cost of services and support revenue increased in all periods presented due to increases in compensation and related benefits driven by additional headcount and third-party fees to support the increase in our professional services business. Operating Expenses (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Research and development Percentage of total revenue Sales and marketing Percentage of total revenue General and administrative Percentage of total revenue Restructuring and other charges Percentage of total revenue Amortization of purchased intangibles Percentage of total revenue Total operating expenses $ (**) Fiscal 2013 862.7 $ 844.4 $ 826.6 18% 20% 20% 1,683.2 1,652.3 1,620.5 35% 40% 40% 531.9 543.3 520.1 11% 13% 13% 1.6 19.9 26.5 ** ** 1% 68.7 52.4 52.3 1% 1% 1% $ 3,148.1 $ 3,112.3 $ 3,046.0 _________________________________________ (*) Fiscal 2014 Percentage is not meaningful. Percentage is less than 1%. 46 % Change 2015-2014 % Change 2014-2013 2% 2% 2% 2% (2)% 4% * (25)% 31 % —% 1% 2% Table of Contents Research and Development, Sales and Marketing and General and Administrative Expenses Research and development and sales and marketing expenses increased slightly during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to increases in compensation and related benefits associated with headcount. General and administrative expenses decreased slightly during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to the reversal of a previously anticipated loss associated with the HTEAL proceedings, offset in part by increases in compensation and related benefits associated with headcount. The increase in research and development and general and administrative expenses during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 was primarily due to increases in cash incentive and stock-based compensation. The increase in stock-based compensation was driven by a change in the vesting term for stock awards granted as part of our annual review process beginning in fiscal 2013, which decreased the term from four years to three years. The increase in sales and marketing expense during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 was primarily due to compensation and related benefits associated with additional headcount. Research and Development Research and development expenses consist primarily of salary and benefit expenses for software developers, contracted development efforts, related facilities costs and expenses associated with computer equipment used in software development. Research and development expenses increased due to the following: % Change 2015-2014 Compensation and related benefits associated with headcount Compensation associated with cash and stock-based incentives Various individually insignificant items Total change 2% (1) 1 2% % Change 2014-2013 —% 2 — 2% We believe that investments in research and development, including the recruiting and hiring of software developers, are critical to remain competitive in the marketplace and are directly related to continued timely development of new and enhanced products, subscription and solution offerings. We will continue to focus on long-term opportunities available in our end markets and make significant investments in the development of our application, tool, subscription and service offerings. Sales and Marketing Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of salary and benefit expenses, sales commissions, travel expenses and related facilities costs for our sales, marketing, order management and global supply chain management personnel. Sales and marketing expenses also include the costs of programs aimed at increasing revenue, such as advertising, trade shows, public relations and other market development programs. Sales and marketing expenses increased due to the following: % Change 2015-2014 Compensation and related benefits associated with headcount Compensation associated with cash incentives Professional and consulting fees Marketing spending related to product launches and overall marketing efforts Various individually insignificant items Total change 3% (2) (2) 2 1 2% % Change 2014-2013 1% — — — 1 2% General and Administrative General and administrative expenses consist primarily of compensation and benefit expenses, travel expenses and related facilities costs for our finance, facilities, human resources, legal, information services and executive personnel. General and administrative expenses also include outside legal and accounting fees, provision for bad debts, expenses associated with computer equipment and software used in the administration of the business, charitable contributions and various forms of insurance. 47 Table of Contents The fluctuations in general and administrative expenses are due to the following: % Change 2015-2014 Compensation and related benefits associated with headcount Compensation associated with cash and stock-based incentives Professional and consulting fees Loss contingency Various individually insignificant items Total change 3% (3) 1 (4) 1 (2)% % Change 2014-2013 —% 3 (2) 2 1 4% The decrease in loss contingency during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 is due to the reversal of a previously anticipated loss associated with the HTEAL proceedings. See Note 15 of our Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding the HTEAL proceedings. Restructuring and Other Charges During the past several years, we have initiated various restructuring plans consisting of reductions in workforce and the consolidation of facilities to better align our resources around our business strategies. As of November 27, 2015, we considered all our restructuring plans to be substantially complete. We continue to make cash outlays to settle obligations under these plans, however the current impact to our Consolidated Financial Statements is not material. During fiscal 2015, we recorded immaterial credits and charges to our restructuring plans. During fiscal 2014, in connection with our Fiscal 2014 Restructuring Plan, we recorded $19.4 million associated with termination benefits and closing redundant facilities. In connection with our Other Restructuring Plans, we recorded insignificant charges associated with closing redundant facilities. During fiscal 2013, we sold land, building and other assets located in Waltham, Massachusetts for net proceeds of $24.3 million. Because the total carrying amount of these assets was $47.4 million at the time it was classified as held for sale, we recorded a write-down of $23.1 million during fiscal 2013. Also during fiscal 2013, in connection with our Fiscal 2011 Restructuring Plan and Other Restructuring Plans, we recorded immaterial charges and credits associated with termination benefits and closing redundant facilities during the fiscal year. See Note 10 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding our restructuring plans. Amortization of Purchased Intangibles During the last several years, we have completed a number of business combinations and asset acquisitions. As a result of these acquisitions, we purchased intangible assets that are being amortized over their estimated useful lives ranging from one to fourteen years. Amortization expense increased during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to amortization expense associated with intangible assets purchased through our acquisition of Fotolia in fiscal 2015, partially offset by the decrease in amortization expense associated with certain intangible assets purchased through our acquisition of Efficient Frontier and Day Software Holding AG that were fully amortized at the end of fiscal 2014. Amortization expense remained stable during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. 48 Table of Contents Non-Operating Income (Expense), Net (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Interest and other income (expense), net Percentage of total revenue Interest expense Percentage of total revenue Investment gains (losses), net Percentage of total revenue Total non-operating income (expense), net $ $ 33.9 $ ** (64.2) (1)% 1.0 ** (29.3) $ Fiscal 2014 7.3 $ ** (59.7) (1)% 1.1 ** (51.3) $ Fiscal 2013 % Change 2015-2014 4.9 ** (67.5) (2)% (4.0) ** (66.6) % Change 2014-2013 * 49 % 8% (12)% * * (43)% (23)% _________________________________________ (*) (**) Percentage is not meaningful. Percentage is less than 1%. Interest and Other Income (Expense), Net Interest and other income (expense), net consists primarily of interest earned on cash, cash equivalents and short-term fixed income investments. Interest and other income (expense), net also includes gains and losses on fixed income investments and foreign exchange gains and losses other than any gains recorded to revenue from our hedging programs. Interest and other income (expense), net increased in fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to the gain on the sale of certain property assets and, to a lesser extent, an increased average investment balance and average interest rate. See Note 6 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further details regarding the sale of our property assets. Interest and other income (expense), net increased in fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 primarily due to decreased foreign currency losses and increased realized gains on fixed income investments. The increases were partially offset by decreased interest income on our investment in lease receivable due to the purchase of the East and West Towers of our corporate headquarter offices during fiscal 2014. See Note 15 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further details regarding our investment in lease receivables. Interest Expense Interest expense primarily represents interest associated with our senior notes and interest rate swaps. Interest on our senior notes is payable semi-annually, in arrears, on February 1 and August 1. Floating interest payments on the interest rate swaps are paid monthly. The fixed-rate interest receivable on the swaps is received semi-annually concurrent with the senior notes interest payments. Interest expense increased during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 primarily due to the increase in total debt, partially offset by the favorable impact of the interest rate swaps. Interest expense decreased during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 due to the favorable impact of the interest rate swaps. See Notes 5 and 13 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further details regarding our interest rate swaps. Investment Gains (Losses), Net Investment gains (losses), net consists principally of realized gains or losses from the sale of marketable equity investments, other-than-temporary declines in the value of marketable and non-marketable equity securities and unrealized holding gains and losses associated with our deferred compensation plan assets (classified as trading securities) and gains and losses associated with our direct and indirect investments in privately held companies. During fiscal 2015, total investment gains (losses), net remained stable compared to fiscal 2014. During fiscal 2014, total investment gains (losses), net increased to net gains primarily due to write-downs for other-thantemporary declines in value of our direct investments in privately held companies in fiscal 2013 that did not recur in fiscal 2014, offset in part by a decrease in net gains related to our trading securities. 49 Table of Contents Provision for Income Taxes (dollars in millions) Fiscal 2015 Provision Percentage of total revenue Effective tax rate $ 244.2 $ 5% 28% Fiscal 2014 93.0 $ 2% 26% Fiscal 2013 66.2 2% 19% % Change 2015-2014 163% % Change 2014-2013 40% Our effective tax rate increased by approximately two percentage points during fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014. The increase was primarily due to tax costs associated with licensing acquired company assets to Adobe’s trading companies. The increase was partially offset by tax benefits related to the reinstatement of the federal research and development tax credit in December 2014. The reinstatement of the credit was retroactive to January 1, 2014. Our effective tax rate increased by approximately seven percentage points during fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. The increase was primarily due to the expiration of the federal research and development tax credit in December 2013 and stronger domestic profits for fiscal 2014. In December 2015, the United States Congress passed the permanent extension of the federal research and development tax credit. As a result, we expect that our income tax provision for the first quarter of fiscal 2016 will include a discrete tax benefit for the 2015 credit which will reduce our effective tax rate for the quarter and, to a lesser extent, the effective annual tax rate. We are a United States-based multinational company subject to tax in multiple U.S. and foreign tax jurisdictions. A significant portion of our foreign earnings for the current fiscal year were earned by our Irish subsidiaries. In addition to providing for U.S. income taxes on earnings from the United States, we provide for U.S. income taxes on the earnings of foreign subsidiaries unless the subsidiaries’ earnings are considered permanently reinvested outside the United States. While we do not anticipate changing our intention regarding permanently reinvested earnings, if certain foreign earnings previously treated as permanently reinvested are repatriated, the related U.S. tax liability may be reduced by any foreign income taxes paid on these earnings. Currently, there are a significant amount of foreign earnings upon which U.S. income taxes have not been provided. See Note 9 of our Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on our provision for income taxes. Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes The gross liability for unrecognized tax benefits at November 27, 2015 was $258.7 million, exclusive of interest and penalties. If the total unrecognized tax benefits at November 27, 2015 were recognized in the future, $220.2 million of unrecognized tax benefits would decrease the effective tax rate, which is net of an estimated $38.5 million federal benefit related to deducting certain payments on future federal and state tax returns. As of November 27, 2015, the combined amount of accrued interest and penalties related to tax positions taken on our tax returns was approximately $27.8 million. This amount is included in non-current income taxes payable. The timing of the resolution of income tax examinations is highly uncertain as are the amounts and timing of tax payments that are part of any audit settlement process. These events could cause large fluctuations in the balance sheet classification of current and non-current assets and liabilities. We believe that within the next 12 months, it is reasonably possible that either certain audits will conclude or statutes of limitations on certain income tax examination periods will expire, or both. Given the uncertainties described above, we can only determine a range of estimated potential decreases in underlying unrecognized tax benefits ranging from $0 to approximately $10 million. 50 Table of Contents LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES This data should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows. As of November 27, 2015 (in millions) Cash and cash equivalents Short-term investments Working capital Stockholders’ equity $ $ $ $ November 28, 2014 876.6 3,111.5 2,608.3 7,001.6 $ $ $ $ 1,117.4 2,622.1 2,107.9 6,775.9 A summary of our cash flows is as follows: Fiscal 2015 (in millions) Net cash provided by operating activities Net cash used for investing activities Net cash used for financing activities Effect of foreign currency exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents $ $ Fiscal 2014 Fiscal 2013 1,469.5 $ (1,488.4) (200.7) 1,287.5 $ (490.7) (507.3) 1,151.7 (1,177.8) (559.1) (21.2) (240.8) $ (6.7) 282.8 $ (5.2) (590.4) Our primary source of cash is receipts from revenue. The primary uses of cash are payroll related expenses, general operating expenses including marketing, travel and office rent, and cost of revenue. Other sources of cash are proceeds from the exercise of employee options and participation in the employee stock purchase plan. Other uses of cash include our stock repurchase program, which is described below, business acquisitions and purchases of property and equipment. Cash Flows from Operating Activities For fiscal 2015, net cash provided by operating activities of $1.47 billion was primarily comprised of net income plus the net effect of non-cash items. The primary working capital sources of cash were net income coupled with increases in deferred revenue, income taxes payable and trade payables. The increase in deferred revenue is primarily due to increased subscriptions for our team, individual and enterprise Creative Cloud offerings and increases in Digital Marketing hosted services. The increase in income taxes payable is primarily due to higher taxable income levels during fiscal 2015. Trade payables increased primarily due to the timing of payments to web services vendors as certain invoices were received in the final weeks of fiscal 2015. The primary working capital uses of cash were increases in trade receivables which were principally due to higher revenue levels. For fiscal 2014, net cash provided by operating activities of $1.29 billion was primarily comprised of net income plus the net effect of non-cash items. The primary working capital sources of cash were net income coupled with increases in deferred revenue and accrued expenses. The increase in deferred revenue was primarily due to increased subscription and ETLA activity for our individual, team and enterprise Creative Cloud offerings and increases in Digital Marketing and Digital Publishing hosted services, offset in part by decreases in billings for our maintenance and Creative product software upgrade plans which we discontinued in January 2013. Accrued expenses increased primarily due to accruals for contract terminations and employee transition payments associated with business realignment initiatives implemented in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014. For fiscal 2013, net cash provided by operating activities of $1.15 billion was primarily comprised of net income plus the net effect of non-cash items. The primary working capital sources of cash were net income coupled with increases in deferred revenue and accrued expenses and decreases in trade receivables. Deferred revenue increased primarily due to increased subscription and ETLA activity for our Creative Cloud offering and increases in Digital Marketing hosted services, offset in part by decreases in billings for our maintenance and Creative product software upgrade plans which were discontinued in January 2013. Accrued expenses increased primarily due to amounts due under our fiscal 2013 annual incentive plan and sales commission accruals associated with higher achievement levels. Trade receivables declined primarily due to lower perpetual license revenue levels and improved collections compared to the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012. The primary working capital uses of cash for fiscal 2013 were decreases in taxes payable and increases in prepaid expenses and other assets. The decrease in taxes payable was largely attributed to tax payments made combined with audit settlement adjustments, offset in part by tax expense and other adjustments during fiscal 2013. Prepaid expenses and other assets increased primarily due to increases in short-term income tax receivables related to the carryback of federal research and development and foreign tax credits in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013. 51 Table of Contents Cash Flows from Investing Activities For fiscal 2015, net cash used for investing activities of $1.49 billion was primarily due to purchases of short-term investments and our acquisition of Fotolia. Other uses of cash during fiscal 2015 represented purchases of property and equipment, and longterm investments and other assets. These cash outflows were offset in part by sales and maturities of short-term investments and proceeds received from the sale of certain property assets. See Note 2 and Note 6 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for more detailed information regarding our acquisition of Fotolia and sale of property assets, respectively. For fiscal 2014, net cash used for investing activities of $490.7 million was primarily due to purchases of short-term investments, purchases of property and equipment and a business acquisition. These cash outflows were offset in part by sales and maturities of short-term investments. For fiscal 2013, net cash used for investing activities of $1.18 billion was primarily due to our acquisitions of Neolane and Behance. Other uses of cash during fiscal 2013 represented purchases of short-term investments, purchases of property and equipment associated with our construction projects in Oregon and India and purchases of long-term technology licenses. These cash outflows were offset in part by sales and maturities of short-term investments and the sale of certain property assets. See Note 2 of our Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for more detailed information regarding our acquisitions of Neolane and Behance. Cash Flows from Financing Activities In January 2015, we issued $1 billion of 3.25% senior notes due February 1, 2025 (the “2025 Notes”). Our proceeds were approximately $989.3 million which is net of an issuance discount of $10.7 million. The 2025 Notes rank equally with our other unsecured and unsubordinated indebtedness. In addition, we incurred issuance costs of $7.9 million in connection with our 2025 Notes. Both the discount and issuance costs are being amortized to interest expense over the term of the 2025 Notes using the effective interest method. We used $600 million of the proceeds from the 2025 Notes offering to repay the outstanding balance plus accrued and unpaid interest of the $600 million 3.25% senior notes due February 1, 2015 (“2015 Notes”). The remaining proceeds were used for general corporate purposes. See Note 16 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for more detailed information. In addition to the 2025 Notes issuance and 2015 Notes repayment, other financing activities during fiscal 2015 include payments for our treasury stock repurchases and costs associated with the issuance of treasury stock, offset in part by proceeds from the issuance of treasury stock and excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation. For fiscal 2014 and 2013, net cash used for financing activities of $507.3 million and $559.1 million, respectively, was primarily due to payments for our treasury stock repurchases and costs associated with the issuance of treasury stock, offset in part by proceeds from the issuance of treasury stock and excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation. See the section titled “Stock Repurchase Program” discussed below. We expect to continue our investing activities, including short-term and long-term investments, venture capital, facilities expansion and purchases of computer systems for research and development, sales and marketing, product support and administrative staff. Furthermore, cash reserves may be used to repurchase stock under our stock repurchase program and to strategically acquire companies, products or technologies that are complementary to our business. Restructuring During the past several years, we have initiated various restructuring plans. We consider our restructuring plans to be substantially complete. As of November 27, 2015, we have accrued total restructuring charges of $4.7 million, substantially all of which relate to the cost of closing redundant facilities and is expected to be paid under contract through fiscal 2021 for which approximately 75% will be paid through fiscal 2017. During fiscal 2015, we made payments related to our restructuring plans totaling $18.2 million which consisted of $16.6 million in payments associated with termination benefits and contract terminations and the remaining payments related to the closing of redundant facilities. As of November 28, 2014, we had accrued total restructuring charges of $22.3 million of which approximately $15.0 million related to termination benefits and contract terminations. The remaining accrued restructuring charges of $7.3 million related to the cost of closing redundant facilities. During fiscal 2014, we made payments related to our restructuring plans totaling $11.0 52 Table of Contents million which consisted of $5.7 million and $5.3 million in payments related to termination benefits and contract terminations and the closing of redundant facilities, respectively. As of November 29, 2013, we had accrued total restructuring charges of $13.9 million of which approximately $11.7 million related to the cost of closing redundant facilities. The remaining accrued restructuring charges of $2.2 million related to the cost of termination benefits and contract terminations. During fiscal 2013, we made payments related to our restructuring plans totaling $10.3 million which primarily consisted of $9.0 million in payments related to the closing of redundant facilities. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and cash generated from operations will be sufficient to meet cash outlays for the restructuring actions described above. See Note 10 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding our restructuring plans. Other Liquidity and Capital Resources Considerations Our existing cash, cash equivalents and investment balances may fluctuate during fiscal 2016 due to changes in our planned cash outlay, including changes in incremental costs such as direct and integration costs related to our acquisitions. Our cash and investments totaled $3.99 billion as of November 27, 2015. Of this amount, approximately 85% was held by our foreign subsidiaries and subject to material repatriation tax effects. Our intent is to permanently reinvest a significant portion of our earnings from foreign operations, and current plans do not anticipate that we will need funds generated from foreign operations to fund our domestic operations. In the event funds from foreign operations are needed to fund operations in the United States and if U.S. tax has not already been previously provided, we would provide for and pay additional U.S. taxes in connection with repatriating these funds. Cash from operations could also be affected by various risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to the risks detailed in Part I, Item 1A titled “Risk Factors”. However, based on our current business plan and revenue prospects, we believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents and investment balances, our anticipated cash flows from operations and our available credit facility will be sufficient to meet our working capital and operating resource expenditure requirements for the next twelve months. On March 2, 2012, we entered into a five-year $1 billion senior unsecured revolving credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”), providing for loans to us and certain of our subsidiaries. On March 1, 2013, we exercised our option under the Credit Agreement to extend the maturity date of the Credit Agreement by one year to March 2, 2018. On July 27, 2015, we entered into an amendment to further extend the maturity date of the Credit Agreement to July 27, 2020 and reallocated the facility among the syndicate of lenders that are parties to the Credit Agreement. As of November 27, 2015, there were no outstanding borrowings under this Credit Agreement and the entire $1 billion credit line remains available for borrowing. As of November 27, 2015, the amount outstanding under our senior notes was $1.9 billion, consisting of $900 million of 4.75% senior notes due February 1, 2020 (the “2020 Notes”) and $1 billion of 3.25% senior notes due February 1, 2025 (together with the 2020 Notes, the “Notes”). Our short-term investment portfolio is primarily invested in corporate bonds and commercial paper, U.S. agency securities and U.S. Treasury securities, foreign government securities, municipal securities and asset-backed securities.We use professional investment management firms to manage a large portion of our invested cash. External investment firms managed, on average, 57% of our consolidated invested balances during fiscal 2015. Stock Repurchase Program To facilitate our stock repurchase program, designed to return value to our stockholders and minimize dilution from stock issuances, we may repurchase shares in the open market or enter into structured repurchase agreements with third parties. In the first quarter of fiscal 2015, the Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program granting the Company authority to repurchase up to $2 billion in common stock through the end of fiscal 2017. During fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, we entered into several structured stock repurchase agreements with large financial institutions, whereupon we provided them with prepayments totaling $625 million, $600 million and $1.1 billion, respectively. Of the $625 million in prepayments made during fiscal 2015, $425 million were under the new $2 billion stock repurchase program and the remaining $200 million were under the previous $2 billion authority. The $600 million and $1.1 billion in prepayments made during fiscal 2014 and 2013 were under the previous $2 billion stock repurchase authority. We enter into these agreements in order to take advantage of repurchasing shares at a guaranteed discount to the Volume Weighted Average Price (“VWAP”) of our common stock over a specified period of time. We only enter into such transactions when the discount that we receive is higher than our estimate of the foregone return on our cash prepayments to the financial institutions. There were no explicit commissions 53 Table of Contents or fees on these structured repurchases. Under the terms of the agreements, there is no requirement for the financial institutions to return any portion of the prepayment to us. The financial institutions agree to deliver shares to us at monthly intervals during the contract term. The parameters used to calculate the number of shares deliverable are: the total notional amount of the contract, the number of trading days in the contract, the number of trading days in the interval and the average VWAP of our stock during the interval less the agreed upon discount. During fiscal 2015, we repurchased approximately 8.1 million shares at an average price of $77.38 through structured repurchase agreements entered into during fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014. During fiscal 2014, we repurchased approximately 10.9 million shares at an average price of $63.48 through structured repurchase agreements entered into during fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013. During fiscal 2013, we repurchased approximately 21.6 million shares at an average price per share of $46.47 through structured repurchase agreements entered into during fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2012. For fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, the prepayments were classified as treasury stock on our Consolidated Balance Sheets at the payment date, though only shares physically delivered to us by November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 were excluded from the computation of earnings per share. As of November 27, 2015, $38.2 million of prepayments remained under the agreement. See Note 13 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion of our stock repurchase programs. Subsequent to November 27, 2015, as part of our $2 billion stock repurchase program, we entered into a structured stock repurchase agreement with a large financial institution whereupon we provided them with a prepayment of $150 million. This amount will be classified as treasury stock on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Upon completion of the $150 million stock repurchase agreement, $1.43 billion remains under our current authority. See Item 5, Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities for share repurchases during the quarter ended November 27, 2015. Summary of Stock Repurchases for Fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands, except average amounts) Board Approval Date April 2012 January 2015 Total shares Total cost Repurchases Under the Plan Structured repurchases(1) Structured repurchases(1) 2015 2014 Shares Average Shares 3,255 $ 73.83 4,849 $ 79.76 8,104 $ 77.38 $627,082 2013 Average Shares 10,852 $ 63.48 — $ — 10,852 $ 63.48 $688,902 Average 21,603 $ 46.47 — $ — 21,603 $ 46.47 $1,003,794 _________________________________________ (1) Stock repurchase agreements executed with large financial institutions. See Stock Repurchase Program above. Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Aggregate Contractual Obligations Our principal commitments as of November 27, 2015 consist of obligations under operating leases, royalty agreements and various service agreements. See Note 15 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding our contractual commitments. Contractual Obligations The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of November 27, 2015 (in millions): Payment Due by Period Less than 1 year Total Notes Operating lease obligations Purchase obligations Total $ $ 2,401.1 185.2 419.8 3,006.1 $ $ 75.3 39.5 341.3 456.1 1-3 years $ $ 150.5 57.1 74.6 282.2 More than 5 years 3-5 years $ $ 1,029.1 43.2 3.9 1,076.2 $ $ 1,146.2 45.4 — 1,191.6 Senior Notes In January 2015, we issued the 2025 Notes and settled the 2015 Notes. As of November 27, 2015, our outstanding notes payable consists of the 2020 Notes and 2025 Notes with a total carrying value of $1.91 billion. At November 27, 2015, our 54 Table of Contents maximum commitment for interest payments under the Notes was $501.1 million for the remaining duration of our Notes. In June 2014, we entered into interest rate swaps that effectively converted the fixed interest rate on our 2020 Notes to a floating interest rate based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) plus a fixed number of basis points through February 1, 2020. Covenants Our credit facility and Almaden Tower lease contain a financial covenant requiring us not to exceed a maximum leverage ratio. As of November 27, 2015, we were in compliance with all of our covenants. We believe these covenants will not impact our credit or cash in the coming fiscal year or restrict our ability to execute our business plan. Our Notes do not contain any financial covenants. Under the terms of our credit agreement and lease agreements, we are not prohibited from paying cash dividends unless payment would trigger an event of default or one currently exists. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes The gross liability for unrecognized tax benefits at November 27, 2015 was $258.7 million, exclusive of interest and penalties. The timing of the resolution of income tax examinations is highly uncertain as are the amounts and timing of tax payments that are part of any audit settlement process. These events could cause large fluctuations in the balance sheet classification of current and non-current assets and liabilities. We believe that within the next 12 months, it is reasonably possible that either certain audits will conclude or statutes of limitations on certain income tax examination periods will expire, or both. Given the uncertainties described above, we can only determine a range of estimated potential decreases in underlying unrecognized tax benefits ranging from $0 to approximately $10 million. Royalties We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue. Indemnifications In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products and from time to time, we are subject to claims by our customers under these indemnification provisions. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations. To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our directors and officers for certain events or occurrences while the director or officer is or was serving at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the director’s or officer’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that limits our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK All market risk sensitive instruments were entered into for non-trading purposes. Foreign Currency Risk Foreign Currency Exposures and Hedging Instruments In countries outside the United States, we transact business in U.S. Dollars and various other currencies which subject us to exposure from movements in exchange rates. We may use foreign exchange purchased options or forward contracts to hedge our foreign currency revenue. Additionally, we hedge our net recognized foreign currency assets and liabilities with foreign exchange forward contracts. We hedge these exposures to reduce the risk that our earnings and cash flows will be adversely affected by changes in exchange rates. 55 Table of Contents Our significant foreign currency revenue exposures for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were as follows (in millions, except Yen): Fiscal 2015 Euro Yen (in billions) British Pounds € ¥ £ 589.6 29.7 192.0 Fiscal 2014 € ¥ £ 455.5 28 159.1 Fiscal 2013 € ¥ £ 434.7 32.5 145.3 As of November 27, 2015, the total absolute value of all outstanding foreign exchange contracts, including options and forwards, was $661.0 million which included the notional equivalent of $318.5 million in Euros, $144.4 million in British Pounds, $118.7 million in Yen and $79.4 million in other foreign currencies. As of November 27, 2015, all contracts were set to expire at various dates through June 2016. The bank counterparties in these contracts could expose us to credit-related losses which would be largely mitigated with collateral security agreements that provide for collateral to be received or posted when the net fair value of these contracts fluctuates from contractually established thresholds. In addition, we enter into master netting arrangements which have the ability to further limit credit-related losses with the same counterparty by permitting net settlement transactions. A sensitivity analysis was performed on all of our foreign exchange derivatives as of November 27, 2015. This sensitivity analysis measures the hypothetical market value resulting from a 10% shift in the value of exchange rates relative to the U.S. Dollar. For option contracts, the Black-Scholes option pricing model was used. A 10% increase in the value of the U.S. Dollar and a corresponding decrease in the value of the hedged foreign currency asset would lead to an increase in the fair value of our financial hedging instruments by $39.0 million. Conversely, a 10% decrease in the value of the U.S. Dollar would result in a decrease in the fair value of these financial instruments by $18.4 million. As a general rule, we do not use foreign exchange contracts to hedge local currency denominated operating expenses in countries where a natural hedge exists. For example, in many countries, revenue in the local currencies substantially offsets the local currency denominated operating expenses. We also have long-term investment exposures consisting of the capitalization and retained earnings in our non-U.S. Dollar functional currency foreign subsidiaries. As of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014, this long-term investment exposure totaled an absolute notional equivalent of $61.9 million and $161.7 million, respectively. At this time, we do not hedge these longterm investment exposures. We do not use foreign exchange contracts for speculative trading purposes, nor do we hedge our foreign currency exposure in a manner that entirely offsets the effects of changes in foreign exchange rates. We regularly review our hedging program and assess the need to utilize financial instruments to hedge currency exposures on an ongoing basis. Cash Flow Hedging—Hedges of Forecasted Foreign Currency Revenue We may use foreign exchange purchased options or forward contracts to hedge foreign currency revenue denominated in Euros, British Pounds and Yen. We hedge these cash flow exposures to reduce the risk that our earnings and cash flows will be adversely affected by changes in exchange rates. These foreign exchange contracts, carried at fair value, may have maturities between one and twelve months. We enter into these foreign exchange contracts to hedge forecasted revenue in the normal course of business and accordingly, they are not speculative in nature. We record changes in the intrinsic value of these cash flow hedges in accumulated other comprehensive income until the forecasted transaction occurs. When the forecasted transaction occurs, we reclassify the related gain or loss on the cash flow hedge to revenue. In the event the underlying forecasted transaction does not occur, or it becomes probable that it will not occur, we reclassify the gain or loss on the related cash flow hedge from accumulated other comprehensive income to interest and other income, net on our Consolidated Statements of Income at that time. For the fiscal year ended November 27, 2015, there were no net gains or losses recognized in other income relating to hedges of forecasted transactions that did not occur. Balance Sheet Hedging—Hedging of Foreign Currency Assets and Liabilities We hedge exposures related to our net recognized foreign currency assets and liabilities with foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce the risk that our earnings and cash flows will be adversely affected by changes in foreign currency exchange rates. These foreign exchange contracts are carried at fair value with changes in the fair value recorded as interest and other income, net. These foreign exchange contracts do not subject us to material balance sheet risk due to exchange rate movements because 56 Table of Contents gains and losses on these contracts are intended to offset gains and losses on the assets and liabilities being hedged. At November 27, 2015, the outstanding balance sheet hedging derivatives had maturities of 180 days or less. See Note 5 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding our hedging activities. Interest Rate Risk Short-Term Investments and Fixed Income Securities At November 27, 2015, we had debt securities classified as short-term investments of $3.1 billion. Changes in interest rates could adversely affect the market value of these investments. The following table separates these investments, based on stated maturities, to show the approximate exposure to interest rates (in millions): Due within one year Due within two years Due within three years Due after three years Total $ $ 853.0 1,202.6 771.3 284.6 3,111.5 A sensitivity analysis was performed on our investment portfolio as of November 27, 2015. The analysis is based on an estimate of the hypothetical changes in market value of the portfolio that would result from an immediate parallel shift in the yield curve of various magnitudes. The following tables present the hypothetical fair values of our debt securities classified as short-term investments assuming immediate parallel shifts in the yield curve of 50 basis points (“BPS”), 100 BPS and 150 BPS. The analysis is shown as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 (dollars in millions): -150 BPS $ 3,172.3 -100 BPS $ 3,156.6 -50 BPS $ 3,135.2 -150 BPS $ 2,663.3 -100 BPS $ 2,656.3 -50 BPS $ 2,641.9 Fair Value 11/27/15 $ 3,111.5 Fair Value 11/28/14 $ 2,621.6 $ +50 BPS 3,087.7 +50 BPS $ 2,599.8 $ +100 BPS 3,063.9 +100 BPS $ 2,578.0 $ +150 BPS 3,040.1 +150 BPS $ 2,556.2 Senior Notes As of November 27, 2015, the amount outstanding under our senior notes was $1.9 billion. In June 2014, we entered into interest rate swaps that effectively converted the fixed interest rate on our 2020 Notes to a floating interest rate based on the LIBOR plus a fixed number of basis points through February 1, 2020. Accordingly, our exposure to fluctuations in market interest rates is on the hedged fixed-rate debt of $900 million. An immediate hypothetical 50 basis points increase or decrease in market interest rates would not have a significant impact on our results of operations. As of November 27, 2015, the total carrying amount of the Notes was $1.91 billion and the related fair value based on inactive market prices was $1.97 billion. Other Market Risk Privately Held Long-Term Investments The privately held companies in which we invest can still be considered in the start-up or development stages which are inherently risky. The technologies or products these companies have under development are typically in the early stages and may never materialize, which could result in a loss of a substantial part of our initial investment in these companies. The evaluation of privately held companies is based on information that we request from these companies, which is not subject to the same disclosure regulations as U.S. publicly traded companies, and as such, the basis for these evaluations is subject to the timing and accuracy of the data received from these companies. We have minimal exposure on our long-term investments in privately held companies as these investments were insignificant as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014. 57 Table of Contents ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page No. Consolidated Balance Sheets Consolidated Statements of Income Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Report of KPMG LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 59 60 61 62 63 64 104 All financial statement schedules have been omitted, since the required information is not applicable or is not present in amounts sufficient to require submission of the schedule, or because the information required is included in the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto. 58 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (In thousands, except par value) November 27, 2015 ASSETS Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents Short-term investments Trade receivables, net of allowances for doubtful accounts of $7,293 and $7,867, respectively Deferred income taxes Prepaid expenses and other current assets Total current assets Property and equipment, net Goodwill Purchased and other intangibles, net Investment in lease receivable Other assets Total assets LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Current liabilities: Trade payables Accrued expenses Debt and capital lease obligations Accrued restructuring Income taxes payable Deferred revenue Total current liabilities Long-term liabilities: Debt and capital lease obligations Deferred revenue Accrued restructuring Income taxes payable Deferred income taxes Other liabilities Total liabilities $ $ $ November 28, 2014 876,560 3,111,524 672,006 — 161,802 4,821,892 787,421 5,366,881 510,007 80,439 159,832 11,726,472 $ 93,307 678,364 — 1,520 6,165 1,434,200 2,213,556 $ $ 1,117,400 2,622,091 591,800 95,279 175,758 4,602,328 785,123 4,721,962 469,662 80,439 126,315 10,785,829 68,377 683,866 603,229 17,120 23,920 1,097,923 2,494,435 1,907,231 51,094 3,214 256,129 208,209 85,459 4,724,892 911,086 57,401 5,194 125,746 342,315 73,747 4,009,924 — — Commitments and contingencies Stockholders’ equity: Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value; 2,000 shares authorized; none issued Common stock, $0.0001 par value; 900,000 shares authorized; 600,834 shares issued; 497,809 and 497,484 shares outstanding, respectively Additional paid-in-capital Retained earnings Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) Treasury stock, at cost (103,025 and 103,350 shares, respectively), net of reissuances Total stockholders’ equity Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity $ See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 59 61 4,184,883 7,253,431 (169,080) (4,267,715) 7,001,580 11,726,472 $ 61 3,778,495 6,924,294 (8,094) (3,918,851) 6,775,905 10,785,829 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (In thousands, except per share data) Years Ended November 27, 2015 Revenue: Subscription Product Services and support Total revenue $ Cost of revenue: Subscription Product Services and support Total cost of revenue 3,223,904 1,125,146 446,461 4,795,511 November 28, 2014 $ 2,076,584 1,627,803 442,678 4,147,065 November 29, 2013 $ 1,137,856 2,470,098 447,286 4,055,240 409,194 90,035 245,088 744,317 335,432 97,099 189,549 622,080 278,077 138,154 170,326 586,557 Gross profit 4,051,194 3,524,985 3,468,683 Operating expenses: Research and development Sales and marketing General and administrative Restructuring and other charges Amortization of purchased intangibles Total operating expenses 862,730 1,683,242 531,919 1,559 68,649 3,148,099 844,353 1,652,308 543,332 19,883 52,424 3,112,300 826,631 1,620,454 520,124 26,497 52,254 3,045,960 903,095 412,685 422,723 33,909 (64,184) 7,267 (59,732) 961 (29,314) 1,156 (51,309) 4,941 (67,508) (4,015) (66,582) 873,781 244,230 629,551 1.26 498,764 1.24 507,164 361,376 92,981 268,395 0.54 497,867 0.53 508,480 356,141 66,156 289,985 0.58 501,372 0.56 513,476 Operating income Non-operating income (expense): Interest and other income (expense), net Interest expense Investment gains (losses), net Total non-operating income (expense), net Income before income taxes Provision for income taxes Net income Basic net income per share Shares used to compute basic net income per share Diluted net income per share Shares used to compute diluted net income per share $ $ $ $ $ $ See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 60 $ $ $ Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (In thousands) Years Ended November 27, 2015 November 28, 2014 November 29, 2013 Increase/(Decrease) Net income Other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes: Available-for-sale securities: Unrealized gains / losses on available-for-sale securities Reclassification adjustment for recognized gains / losses on availablefor-sale securities Net increase (decrease) from available-for-sale securities Derivatives designated as hedging instruments: Unrealized gains / losses on derivative instruments Reclassification adjustment for recognized gains / losses on derivative instruments Net increase (decrease) from derivatives designated as hedging instruments Foreign currency translation adjustments Other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes Total comprehensive income, net of taxes $ $ 629,551 268,395 $ 289,985 (9,226) 2,315 (2,185) (2,955) (12,181) (3,928) (1,613) (3,013) (5,198) 29,795 41,993 34,677 (55,535) (18,705) (35,914) (25,740) (123,065) (160,986) 23,288 (75,872) (54,197) (1,237) 468,565 See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 61 $ $ 214,198 $ 21,826 15,391 305,376 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (In thousands) Common Stock Shares Balances at November 30, 2012 Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Shares $ (106,702) $(3,407,259) $ 6,665,182 Amount Total $ 3,038,665 $7,003,003 — — 289,985 — — — 289,985 — — — — 15,391 — — 15,391 — — — — 23,732 864,800 500,776 — — 25,290 — — — — 25,290 Purchase of treasury stock — — — — — Equity awards assumed for acquisition — — 1,160 — — — — 1,160 Stock-based compensation — — 327,581 — — — — 327,581 — (731) Value of shares in deferred compensation plan Balances at November 29, 2013 Net income Other comprehensive income, net of taxes Re-issuance of treasury stock under stock compensation plans Tax benefit from employee stock plans — (364,024) — — — 61 $ 3,392,696 $6,928,964 — — — 268,395 — — — — — — — 600,834 $ 30,712 Treasury Stock 61 Other comprehensive income, net of taxes Re-issuance of treasury stock under stock compensation plans Tax benefit from employee stock plans $ Retained Earnings — Net income 600,834 Amount Additional Paid-In Capital (21,603) — $ 46,103 (1,100,000) (731) (104,573) $(3,643,190) $ 6,724,634 — (54,197) (273,065) (1,100,000) — — — 268,395 — — (54,197) 12,075 327,231 — — 53,225 — — Purchase of treasury stock — — — — — Equity awards assumed for acquisition — — 21 — — — — 21 Stock-based compensation — — 332,553 — — — — 332,553 Value of shares in deferred compensation plan — — — — — — Balances at November 28, 2014 (2,892) $ 3,778,495 $6,924,294 — 629,551 — — — — — — — Tax benefit from employee stock plans — — 68,133 — — Purchase of treasury stock — — — — — Equity awards assumed for acquisition — — 677 — — — — 677 Stock-based compensation — — 337,578 — — — — 337,578 — — — — — — 61 $ 4,184,883 $7,253,431 600,834 $ (8,094) (2,892) 53,225 (600,000) — Value of shares in deferred compensation plan Balances at November 27, 2015 $ — (600,000) 61 Other comprehensive income, net of taxes Re-issuance of treasury stock under stock compensation plans $ (10,852) — Net income 600,834 — 54,166 (103,350) $(3,918,851) $ 6,775,905 — (160,986) (300,414) — $ (169,080) — 629,551 — — (160,986) 8,429 278,311 (22,103) — (8,104) — (625,000) (2,175) 68,133 (625,000) (2,175) (103,025) $(4,267,715) $ 7,001,580 See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 62 — Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (In thousands) November 27, 2015 Cash flows from operating activities: Net income Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Depreciation, amortization and accretion Stock-based compensation Deferred income taxes Gain on the sale of property Write down of assets held for sale Unrealized (gains) losses on investments Tax benefit from stock-based compensation Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation Other non-cash items Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of acquired assets and assumed liabilities: Trade receivables, net Prepaid expenses and other current assets Trade payables Accrued expenses Accrued restructuring Income taxes payable Deferred revenue Net cash provided by operating activities Cash flows from investing activities: Purchases of short-term investments Maturities of short-term investments Proceeds from sales of short-term investments Acquisitions, net of cash acquired Purchases of property and equipment Proceeds from sale of property Purchases of long-term investments, intangibles and other assets Proceeds from sale of long-term investments Net cash used for investing activities Cash flows from financing activities: Purchases of treasury stock Proceeds from issuance of treasury stock Cost of issuance of treasury stock Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation Proceeds from debt and capital lease obligations Repayment of debt and capital lease obligations Debt issuance costs Net cash used for financing activities Effect of foreign currency exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents at end of year Supplemental disclosures: Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds Cash paid for interest Non-cash investing activities: Investment in lease receivable applied to building purchase Issuance of common stock and stock awards assumed in business acquisitions $ $ 629,551 $ 268,395 November 29, 2013 $ 289,985 339,473 335,859 (69,657) (21,415) — (9,210) 68,133 (68,153) 1,216 313,590 333,701 (26,089) — — (74) 53,225 (53,235) 1,889 321,227 328,987 29,704 — 23,151 5,665 25,290 (40,619) 5,654 (79,502) (7,701) 22,870 (5,944) (16,620) 29,801 320,801 1,469,502 7,928 (1,918) 6,211 37,544 8,871 11,006 326,438 1,287,482 33,649 (55,509) 7,132 41,828 (6,949) (58,875) 201,366 1,151,686 (2,064,833) 371,790 1,176,476 (826,004) (184,936) 57,779 (22,779) 4,149 (1,488,358) (2,014,186) 272,076 1,443,577 (29,802) (148,332) — (17,572) 3,532 (490,707) (2,058,058) 360,485 1,449,961 (704,589) (188,358) 24,260 (67,737) 6,233 (1,177,803) (625,000) 164,270 (186,373) 68,153 989,280 (602,189) (8,828) (200,687) (21,297) (240,840) 1,117,400 876,560 $ (600,000) 227,841 (173,675) 53,235 — (14,684) — (507,283) (6,648) 282,844 834,556 1,117,400 $ (1,100,000) 598,194 (97,418) 40,619 25,703 (25,879) (357) (559,138) (5,241) (590,496) 1,425,052 834,556 $ $ 203,010 56,014 $ $ 20,140 68,886 $ $ 129,701 64,843 $ $ — 677 $ $ 126,800 21 $ $ — 1,160 See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. 63 Years Ended November 28, 2014 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Operations Founded in 1982, Adobe Systems Incorporated is one of the largest and most diversified software companies in the world. We offer a line of products and services used by creative professionals, marketers, knowledge workers, application developers, enterprises and consumers for creating, managing, delivering, measuring, optimizing and engaging with compelling content and experiences across multiple operating systems, devices and media. We market and license our products and services directly to enterprise customers through our sales force and to end users through app stores and our own website at www.adobe.com. We offer many of our products via a Software-as-a-Service (“SaaS”) model or a managed services model (both of which are referred to as a hosted or cloud-based model) as well as through term subscription and pay-per-use models. We also distribute certain products and services through a network of distributors, value-added resellers (“VARs”), systems integrators, independent software vendors (“ISVs”), retailers and original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). In addition, we license our technology to hardware manufacturers, software developers and service providers for use in their products and solutions. Our products run on personal and server-based computers, as well as on smartphones, tablets and other devices, depending on the product. We have operations in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa (“EMEA”) and Asia-Pacific (“APAC”). Basis of Presentation The accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements include those of Adobe and its subsidiaries, after elimination of all intercompany accounts and transactions. We have prepared the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Use of Estimates In preparing Consolidated Financial Statements and related disclosures in conformity with GAAP and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC, we must make estimates and judgments that affect the amounts reported in the Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes. Estimates are used for, but not limited to, sales allowances and programs, bad debts, stockbased compensation, determining the fair value of acquired assets and assumed liabilities, excess inventory and purchase commitments, restructuring charges, facilities lease losses, impairment of goodwill and intangible assets, litigation, income taxes and investments. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates. Fiscal Year Our fiscal year is a 52- or 53-week year that ends on the Friday closest to November 30. Fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were 52-week years. Significant Accounting Policies Revenue Recognition Our revenue is derived from the licensing of subscription, time-based and perpetual software products, associated software maintenance and support plans, non-software related hosted services, consulting services, training and technical support. We recognize revenue when all four revenue recognition criteria have been met: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, we have delivered the product or performed the service, the fee is fixed or determinable and collection is probable. Determining whether and when some of these criteria have been satisfied often involves assumptions and judgments that can have a significant impact on the timing and amount of revenue we report. Multiple Element Arrangements We enter into multiple element revenue arrangements in which a customer may purchase a combination of software, upgrades, maintenance and support, hosted services, and consulting. For our software and software-related multiple element arrangements, we must: (1) determine whether and when each element has been delivered; (2) determine whether undelivered products or services are essential to the functionality of the delivered 64 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) products and services; (3) determine the fair value of each undelivered element using vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”); and (4) allocate the total price among the various elements. VSOE of fair value is used to allocate a portion of the price to the undelivered elements and the residual method is used to allocate the remaining portion to the delivered elements. Absent VSOE, revenue is deferred until the earlier of the point at which VSOE of fair value exists for any undelivered element or until all elements of the arrangement have been delivered. However, if the only undelivered element is maintenance and support, the entire arrangement fee is recognized ratably over the performance period. Changes in assumptions or judgments or changes to the elements in a software arrangement could cause a material increase or decrease in the amount of revenue that we report in a particular period. We determine VSOE for each element based on historical stand-alone sales to third parties or from the stated renewal rate for the elements contained in the initial arrangement. In determining VSOE, we require that a substantial majority of the selling prices for a product or service fall within a reasonably narrow pricing range. We have established VSOE for our software maintenance and support services, custom software development services, consulting services and training, when such services are sold optionally with software licenses. For multiple-element arrangements containing our non-software services, we must: (1) determine whether and when each element has been delivered; (2) determine the fair value of each element using the selling price hierarchy of VSOE of selling price, third-party evidence (“TPE”) of selling price or best-estimated selling price (“BESP”), as applicable; and (3) allocate the total price among the various elements based on the relative selling price method. For multiple-element arrangements that contain both software and non-software elements, we allocate revenue to software or software-related elements as a group and any non-software elements separately based on the selling price hierarchy. We determine the selling price for each deliverable using VSOE of selling price, if it exists, or TPE of selling price. If neither VSOE nor TPE of selling price exist for a deliverable, we use BESP. Once revenue is allocated to software or software-related elements as a group, we recognize revenue in conformance with software revenue accounting guidance. Revenue is recognized when revenue recognition criteria are met for each element. We are generally unable to establish VSOE or TPE for non-software elements and as such, we use BESP. BESP is generally used for offerings that are not typically sold on a stand-alone basis or for new or highly customized offerings. We determine BESP for a product or service by considering multiple factors including, but not limited to major product groupings, geographies, market conditions, competitive landscape, internal costs, gross margin objectives and pricing practices. Pricing practices taken into consideration include historic contractually stated prices, volume discounts where applicable and our price lists. We must estimate certain royalty revenue amounts due to the timing of securing information from our customers. While we believe we can make reliable estimates regarding these matters, these estimates are inherently subjective. Accordingly, our assumptions and judgments regarding future products and services as well as our estimates of royalty revenue could differ from actual events, thus materially impacting our financial position and results of operations. Subscription and Services and Support Revenue We recognize revenue for hosted services that are based on a committed number of transactions, ratably beginning on the date the services are first made available to the customer and continuing through the end of the contractual service term. Overusage fees, and fees billed based on the actual number of transactions from which we capture data, are billed in accordance with contract terms as these fees are incurred. We record amounts that have been invoiced in accounts receivable and in deferred revenue or revenue, depending on whether all revenue recognition criteria have been met. Our services and support revenue is composed of consulting, training and maintenance and support, primarily related to the licensing of our enterprise, mobile and device products and solutions. Our support revenue also includes technical support and developer support to partners and developer organizations related to our desktop products. Our consulting revenue is recognized using a time and materials basis and is measured monthly based on input measures, such as hours incurred to date, with consideration given to output measures, such as contract milestones when applicable. Our maintenance and support offerings, which entitle customers to receive product upgrades and enhancements on a when and if available basis or technical support, depending on the offering, are recognized ratably over the performance period of the arrangement. 65 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Our software subscription offerings, which may include product upgrades and enhancements on a when and if available basis, hosted services, and online storage are generally offered to our customers over a specified period of time and we recognize revenue associated with these arrangements ratably over the subscription period. Product Revenue We recognize our product revenue upon shipment, provided all other revenue recognition criteria have been met. Our desktop application product revenue from distributors is subject to agreements allowing limited rights of return, rebates and price protection. Our direct sales and OEM sales are also subject to limited rights of return. Accordingly, we reduce revenue recognized for estimated future returns, price protection and rebates at the time the related revenue is recorded. The estimates for returns are adjusted periodically based upon historical rates of returns, inventory levels in the distribution channel and other related factors. We recognize OEM licensing revenue, primarily royalties, when OEMs ship products incorporating our software, provided collection of such revenue is deemed probable. For certain OEM customers, we must estimate royalty revenue due to the timing of securing customer information. This estimate is based on a combination of our generated forecasts and actual historical reporting by our OEM customers. To substantiate our ability to estimate revenue, we review license royalty revenue reports ultimately received from our significant OEM customers in comparison to the amounts estimated in the prior period. Our product-related deferred revenue includes maintenance upgrade revenue and customer advances under OEM license agreements. Our maintenance upgrade revenue for our desktop application products is included in our product revenue line item as the maintenance primarily entitles customers to receive product upgrades. In cases where we provide a specified free upgrade to an existing product, we defer the fair value for the specified upgrade right until the future obligation is fulfilled or when the right to the specified free upgrade expires. Rights of Return, Rebates and Price Protection As discussed above, we offer limited rights of return, rebates and price protection of our products under various policies and programs with our distributors, resellers and/or end-user customers. We estimate and record reserves for these programs as an offset to revenue and accounts receivable. Below is a summary of each of the general provisions in our contracts: • Distributors are allowed limited rights of return of products purchased during the previous quarter. In addition, distributors are allowed to return products that have reached the end of their lives, as defined by us, and products that are being replaced by new versions. • We offer rebates to our distributors, resellers and/or end user customers. The amount of revenue that is reduced for distributor and reseller rebates is based on actual performance against objectives set forth by us for a particular reporting period (volume, timely reporting, etc.). If mail-in or other promotional rebates are offered, the amount of revenue reduced is based on the dollar amount of the rebate, taking into consideration an estimated redemption rate calculated using historical trends. • From time to time, we may offer price protection to our distributors that allow for the right to a credit if we permanently reduce the price of a software product. The amount of revenue that is reduced for price protection is calculated as the difference between the old and new price of a software product on inventory held by the distributor immediately prior to the effective date of the decrease. Although our subscription contracts are generally non-cancellable, a limited number of customers have the right to cancel their contracts by providing prior written notice to us of their intent to cancel the remainder of the contract term. In the event a customer cancels its contract, they are not entitled to a refund for prior services we have provided to them. On a quarterly basis, the amount of revenue that is reserved for future returns is calculated based on our historical trends and data specific to each reporting period. We review the actual returns evidenced in prior quarters as a percent of revenue to determine a historical returns rate. We then apply the historical rate to the current period revenue as a basis for estimating future returns. When necessary, we also provide a specific returns reserve for product in the distribution channel in excess of estimated requirements. This estimate can be affected by the amount of a particular product in the channel, the rate of sell-through, product plans and other factors. 66 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Revenue Reserve Revenue reserve rollforward (in thousands): Beginning balance Amount charged to revenue Actual returns Ending balance $ $ 2015 2014 17,402 $ 45,676 (43,632) 19,446 $ 28,664 $ 57,058 45,550 74,031 (56,812) (102,425) 17,402 $ 28,664 2013 Deferred Revenue Deferred revenue consists substantially of payments received in advance of revenue recognition for our products and services described above. We recognize deferred revenue as revenue only when the revenue recognition criteria are met. Allowance for Doubtful Accounts We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts which reflects our best estimate of potentially uncollectible trade receivables. The allowance is based on both specific and general reserves. We regularly review our trade receivables allowances by considering such factors as historical experience, credit-worthiness, the age of the trade receivable balances and current economic conditions that may affect a customer’s ability to pay and we specifically reserve for those deemed uncollectible. 2015 (in thousands) Beginning balance Increase due to acquisition Charged to operating expenses Deductions(1) Ending balance $ $ 7,867 $ 326 1,472 (2,372) 7,293 $ 2014 10,228 $ 51 603 (3,015) 7,867 $ 2013 12,643 1,038 933 (4,386) 10,228 ________________________________________ (1) Deductions related to the allowance for doubtful accounts represent amounts written off against the allowance, less recoveries. Property and Equipment We record property and equipment at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Property and equipment are depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives ranging from 1 to 5 years for computers and equipment as well as server hardware under capital leases, 1 to 6 years for furniture and fixtures, and up to 40 years for buildings. Leasehold improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the lesser of the remaining respective lease term or estimated useful lives ranging from 1 to 15 years. Goodwill, Purchased Intangibles and Other Long-Lived Assets Goodwill is assigned to one or more reporting segments on the date of acquisition. We evaluate goodwill for impairment by comparing the fair value of each of our reporting segments to its carrying value, including the associated goodwill. To determine the fair values, we use the equal weighting of the market approach based on comparable publicly traded companies in similar lines of businesses and the income approach based on estimated discounted future cash flows. Our cash flow assumptions consider historical and forecasted revenue, operating costs and other relevant factors. We review our goodwill for impairment annually, or more frequently, if facts and circumstances warrant a review. We completed our annual impairment test in the second quarter of fiscal 2015. We elected to use the Step 1 quantitative assessment for our reporting units and determined there was no impairment of goodwill. We amortize intangible assets with finite lives over their estimated useful lives and review them for impairment whenever an impairment indicator exists. We continually monitor events and changes in circumstances that could indicate carrying amounts of our long-lived assets, including our intangible assets may not be recoverable. When such events or changes in circumstances occur, we assess recoverability by determining whether the carrying value of such assets will be recovered through the undiscounted 67 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) expected future cash flows. If the future undiscounted cash flows are less than the carrying amount of these assets, we recognize an impairment loss based on any excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of the assets. We did not recognize any intangible asset impairment charges in fiscal 2015, 2014 or 2013. During fiscal 2015, our intangible assets were amortized over their estimated useful lives ranging from 1 to 14 years. Amortization is based on the pattern in which the economic benefits of the intangible asset will be consumed or on a straight-line basis when the consumption pattern is not apparent. The weighted average useful lives of our intangible assets were as follows: Weighted Average Useful Life (years) Purchased technology Customer contracts and relationships Trademarks Acquired rights to use technology Localization Other intangibles 6 8 8 8 1 5 Software Development Costs Capitalization of software development costs for software to be sold, leased, or otherwise marketed begins upon the establishment of technological feasibility, which is generally the completion of a working prototype that has been certified as having no critical bugs and is a release candidate. Amortization begins once the software is ready for its intended use, generally based on the pattern in which the economic benefits will be consumed. To date, software development costs incurred between completion of a working prototype and general availability of the related product have not been material. Internal Use Software We capitalize costs associated with customized internal-use software systems that have reached the application development stage. Such capitalized costs include external direct costs utilized in developing or obtaining the applications and payroll and payroll-related expenses for employees who are directly associated with the development of the applications. Capitalization of such costs begins when the preliminary project stage is complete and ceases at the point in which the project is substantially complete and is ready for its intended purpose. Income Taxes We use the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under this method, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of taxes payable or refundable for the current year. In addition, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carryforwards. We record a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to an amount for which realization is more likely than not. Taxes Collected from Customers We net taxes collected from customers against those remitted to government authorities in our financial statements. Accordingly, taxes collected from customers are not reported as revenue. Treasury Stock We account for treasury stock under the cost method. When treasury stock is re-issued at a price higher than its cost, the difference is recorded as a component of additional paid-in-capital in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. When treasury stock is re-issued at a price lower than its cost, the difference is recorded as a component of additional paid-in-capital to the extent that there are previously recorded gains to offset the losses. If there are no treasury stock gains in additional paid-in-capital, the losses upon re-issuance of treasury stock are recorded as a reduction of retained earnings in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. 68 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Advertising Expenses Advertising costs are expensed as incurred. Advertising expenses for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were $113.6 million, $87.9 million and $88.5 million, respectively. Foreign Currency Translation We translate assets and liabilities of foreign subsidiaries, whose functional currency is their local currency, at exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date. We translate revenue and expenses at the monthly average exchange rates. We include accumulated net translation adjustments in stockholders’ equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income. Foreign Currency and Other Hedging Instruments In countries outside the United States, we transact business in U.S. Dollars and in various other currencies. We use foreign exchange option and forward contracts for revenue denominated in Euros, British Pounds and Yen. We hedge our net recognized foreign currency assets and liabilities with foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce the risk that our earnings and cash flows will be adversely affected by changes in exchange rates. We recognize all derivative instruments as either assets or liabilities in our Consolidated Balance Sheets and measure them at fair value. Gains and losses resulting from changes in fair value are accounted for depending on the use of the derivative and whether it is designated and qualifies for hedge accounting. Contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting are adjusted to fair value through earnings. See Note 5 for information regarding our hedging activities. Gains and losses from foreign exchange forward contracts which hedge certain balance sheet positions are recorded each period as a component of interest and other income, net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. Foreign exchange option contracts hedging forecasted foreign currency revenue are designated as cash flow hedges with gains and losses recorded net of tax, as a component of other comprehensive income in stockholders’ equity and reclassified into revenue at the time the forecasted transactions occur. Concentration of Risk Financial instruments that potentially subject us to concentrations of credit risk are short-term fixed-income investments, structured repurchase transactions, foreign currency and interest rate hedge contracts and trade receivables. Our investment portfolio consists of investment-grade securities diversified among security types, industries and issuers. Our cash and investments are held and primarily managed by recognized financial institutions that follow our investment policy. Our policy limits the amount of credit exposure to any one security issue or issuer and we believe no significant concentration of credit risk exists with respect to these investments. We enter into foreign currency hedge contracts with bank counterparties that could expose us to credit related losses in the event of their nonperformance. This is largely mitigated with collateral security agreements that provide for collateral to be received or posted when the net fair value of certain financial instruments fluctuates from contractually established thresholds. In addition, we enter into master netting arrangements which have the ability to further limit credit related losses with the same counterparty by permitting net settlement transactions. The aggregate fair value of foreign currency contracts in net asset positions as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 was $19.1 million and $33.0 million respectively. These amounts represent the maximum exposure to loss at the reporting date as a result of all of the counterparties failing to perform as contracted. These exposures could be reduced by certain immaterial liabilities included in master netting arrangements with those same counterparties. Credit risk in receivables is limited to OEMs, dealers and distributors of hardware and software products to the retail market, customers to whom we license software directly and our SaaS offerings. A credit review is completed for our new distributors, dealers and OEMs. We also perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers’ financial condition and require letters of credit or other guarantees, whenever deemed necessary. The credit limit given to the customer is based on our risk assessment of their ability to pay, country risk and other factors and is not contingent on the resale of the product or on the collection of payments from their customers. We also purchase credit insurance to mitigate credit risk in some foreign markets where we believe it is 69 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) warranted. If we license our software or provide SaaS services to a customer where we have a reason to believe the customer’s ability to pay is not probable, due to country risk or credit risk, we will not recognize the revenue. We will revert to recognizing the revenue on a cash basis, assuming all other criteria for revenue recognition has been met. We derive a significant portion of our OEM PostScript and Other licensing revenue from a small number of OEMs. Our OEMs on occasion seek to renegotiate their royalty arrangements. We evaluate these requests on a case-by-case basis. If an agreement is not reached, a customer may decide to pursue other options, which could result in lower licensing revenue for us. Recent Accounting Pronouncements On November 20, 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU No. 2015-17, Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes, requiring all deferred tax assets and liabilities, and any related valuation allowance, to be classified as noncurrent on the balance sheet. The classification change for all deferred taxes as noncurrent simplifies entities’ processes as it eliminates the need to separately identify the net current and net noncurrent deferred tax asset or liability in each jurisdiction and allocate valuation allowances. We elected to prospectively adopt the accounting standard in the beginning of our fourth quarter of fiscal 2015. Prior periods in our Consolidated Financial Statements were not retrospectively adjusted. Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Effective On May 28, 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, requiring an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The updated standard will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective and permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Deferral of the Effective Date, which deferred the effective date of the new revenue standard for periods beginning after December 15, 2016 to December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted but not earlier than the original effective date. Accordingly, the updated standard is effective for us in the first quarter of fiscal 2019. We have not yet selected a transition method and we are currently evaluating the effect that the updated standard will have on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. With the exception of the new revenue standard discussed above, there have been no new accounting pronouncements that have significance, or potential significance, to our Consolidated Financial Statements. NOTE 2. ACQUISITIONS Fotolia On January 27, 2015, we completed our acquisition of privately held Fotolia, a leading marketplace for royalty-free photos, images, graphics and HD videos. During the first quarter of fiscal 2015, we began integrating Fotolia into our Digital Media reportable segment. Under the acquisition method of accounting, the total final purchase price was allocated to Fotolia's net tangible and intangible assets based upon their estimated fair values as of January 27, 2015. During fiscal 2015, we recorded immaterial purchase accounting adjustments based on changes to management’s estimates and assumptions in regards to assumed intangible assets, calculation of deferred tax assets, liabilities and equity awards. The total final purchase price for Fotolia was $807.5 million of which $745.1 million was allocated to goodwill that was non-deductible for tax purposes, $204.4 million to identifiable intangible assets and $142.0 million to net liabilities assumed. Neolane On July 22, 2013, we completed our acquisition of privately held Neolane, a leader in cross-channel campaign management technology. During the third quarter of fiscal 2013, we began integrating Neolane into our Digital Marketing reportable segment. Neolane brings a platform for automation and execution of marketing campaigns across the web, e-mail, social, mobile, call center, direct mail, point of sale and other emerging channels which will drive consistent brand experiences and personalized campaigns for our customers. 70 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Under the acquisition method of accounting, the total final purchase price was allocated to Neolane’s net tangible and intangible assets based upon their estimated fair values as of July 22, 2013. The total final purchase price for Neolane was $616.7 million of which $515.2 million was allocated to goodwill that was non-deductible for tax purposes, $115.0 million to identifiable intangible assets and $13.5 million to net liabilities assumed. Behance On December 20, 2012, we completed our acquisition of privately held Behance, an online social media platform to showcase and discover creative work. During the first quarter of fiscal 2013, we began integrating Behance into our Digital Media reportable segment. Behance’s community and portfolio capabilities have accelerated our strategy to bring additional community features to Creative Cloud. Under the acquisition method of accounting, the total purchase price was allocated to Behance’s net tangible and intangible assets based upon their estimated fair values as of December 20, 2012. The total final purchase price for Behance was approximately $111.1 million of which $91.4 million was allocated to goodwill, $28.5 million to identifiable intangible assets and $8.8 million to net liabilities assumed. We also completed other immaterial business acquisitions during the fiscal years presented. Pro forma information has not been presented for any of our fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 acquisitions as the impact to our Consolidated Financial Statements was not material. NOTE 3. CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS Cash equivalents consist of instruments with remaining maturities of three months or less at the date of purchase. We classify all of our cash equivalents and short-term investments as “available-for-sale.” In general, these investments are free of trading restrictions. We carry these investments at fair value, based on quoted market prices or other readily available market information. Unrealized gains and losses, net of taxes, are included in accumulated other comprehensive income, which is reflected as a separate component of stockholders’ equity in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Gains and losses are recognized when realized in our Consolidated Statements of Income. When we have determined that an other-than-temporary decline in fair value has occurred, the amount of the decline that is related to a credit loss is recognized in income. Gains and losses are determined using the specific identification method. 71 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments consisted of the following as of November 27, 2015 (in thousands): Amortized Cost Current assets: Cash Cash equivalents: Money market mutual funds Municipal securities Time deposits U.S. Treasury securities Total cash equivalents Total cash and cash equivalents Short-term fixed income securities: Corporate bonds and commercial paper Asset-backed securities Foreign government securities Municipal securities U.S. agency securities U.S. Treasury securities Total short-term investments Total cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments $ 352,371 Unrealized Gains $ — 482,479 1,850 13,461 26,400 524,190 876,561 — — — — — — 1,890,253 83,449 1,276 137,280 130,397 873,400 3,116,055 $ 3,992,616 2,273 11 — 101 85 101 2,571 2,571 72 $ Unrealized Losses $ — — (1) — — (1) (1) $ Estimated Fair Value $ 352,371 482,479 1,849 13,461 26,400 524,189 876,560 (5,612) 1,886,914 (146) 83,314 (8) 1,268 (49) 137,332 (14) 130,468 (1,273) 872,228 (7,102) 3,111,524 (7,103) $ 3,988,084 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments consisted of the following as of November 28, 2014 (in thousands): Amortized Cost Current assets: Cash Cash equivalents: Money market mutual funds Time deposits Total cash equivalents Total cash and cash equivalents Short-term fixed income securities: Corporate bonds and commercial paper $ Foreign government securities Municipal securities U.S. agency securities U.S. Treasury securities Subtotal Marketable equity securities Total short-term investments Total cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments Unrealized Gains 348,283 $ — 705,978 63,139 769,117 1,117,400 — — — — 1,514,632 4,499 174,775 497,154 423,075 2,614,135 153 2,614,288 $ 3,731,688 $ Unrealized Losses $ Estimated Fair Value — $ 348,283 — — — — 705,978 63,139 769,117 1,117,400 5,253 (509) 1,519,376 12 438 1,295 1,080 8,078 338 8,416 8,416 — (12) (64) (28) (613) 4,511 175,201 498,385 424,127 2,621,600 — 491 (613) 2,622,091 (613) $ 3,739,491 $ See Note 4 for further information regarding the fair value of our financial instruments. The following table summarizes the fair value and gross unrealized losses related to available-for-sale securities, aggregated by investment category, that have been in an unrealized loss position for less than twelve months, as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 (in thousands): 2015 Fair Value Corporate bonds and commercial paper Asset-backed securities Municipal securities Foreign government securities U.S. Treasury and agency securities Total $ $ 1,112,883 60,057 35,594 1,268 820,570 2,030,372 2014 Gross Unrealized Losses $ $ (5,377) $ (147) (50) (8) (1,287) (6,869) $ Gross Unrealized Losses Fair Value 291,890 — 21,759 — 43,507 357,156 $ $ (443) — (12) — (64) (519) There were 914 securities and 213 securities in an unrealized loss position for less than twelve months at November 27, 2015 and at November 28, 2014, respectively. 73 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) The following table summarizes the fair value and gross unrealized losses related to available-for-sale securities, aggregated by investment category, that were in a continuous unrealized loss position for more than twelve months, as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 (in thousands): 2015 Fair Value Corporate bonds and commercial paper Municipal securities U.S. Treasury and agency securities Total $ $ 30,218 1,300 — 31,518 2014 Gross Unrealized Losses $ $ Gross Unrealized Losses Fair Value (233) $ (1) — (234) $ 8,636 — 5,884 14,520 $ (66) $ — (28) (94) There were fifteen securities and eight securities in an unrealized loss position for more than twelve months at November 27, 2015 and at November 28, 2014, respectively. The following table summarizes the cost and estimated fair value of short-term fixed income securities classified as shortterm investments based on stated effective maturities as of November 27, 2015 (in thousands): Amortized Cost Due within one year Due between one and two years Due between two and three years Due after three years Total $ $ 853,041 1,205,254 773,150 284,610 3,116,055 Estimated Fair Value $ $ 853,007 1,202,586 771,332 284,599 3,111,524 We review our debt and marketable equity securities classified as short-term investments on a regular basis to evaluate whether or not any security has experienced an other-than-temporary decline in fair value. We consider factors such as the length of time and extent to which the market value has been less than the cost, the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer and our intent to sell, or whether it is more likely than not we will be required to sell the investment before recovery of the investment’s amortized cost basis. If we believe that an other-than-temporary decline exists in one of these securities, we write down these investments to fair value. For debt securities, the portion of the write-down related to credit loss would be recorded to interest and other income, net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. Any portion not related to credit loss would be recorded to accumulated other comprehensive income, which is reflected as a separate component of stockholders’ equity in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. For equity securities, the write-down would be recorded to investment gains (losses), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. During fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, we did not consider any of our investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired. 74 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) NOTE 4. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS Assets and Liabilities Measured and Recorded at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis We measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value on a recurring basis. There have been no transfers between fair value measurement levels during the year ended November 27, 2015. The fair value of our financial assets and liabilities at November 27, 2015 was determined using the following inputs (in thousands): Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets (Level 1) Total Assets: Cash equivalents: Money market mutual funds Municipal securities Time deposits U.S. Treasury securities Short-term investments: Corporate bonds and commercial paper Asset-backed securities Foreign government securities Municipal securities U.S. agency securities U.S. Treasury securities Prepaid expenses and other current assets: Foreign currency derivatives Other assets: Deferred compensation plan assets Interest rate swap derivatives Total assets Liabilities: Accrued expenses: Foreign currency derivatives Total liabilities $ 482,479 1,849 13,461 26,400 $ 482,479 — 13,461 — Significant Other Observable Inputs (Level 2) $ — 1,849 — 26,400 Significant Unobservable Inputs (Level 3) $ — — — — 1,886,914 83,314 1,268 137,332 130,468 872,228 — — — — — — 1,886,914 83,314 1,268 137,332 130,468 872,228 — — — — — — 19,126 — 19,126 — $ 32,063 19,821 3,706,723 $ 971 — 496,911 $ 31,092 19,821 3,209,812 $ — — — $ $ 2,154 2,154 $ $ — — $ $ 2,154 2,154 $ $ — — 75 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) The fair value of our financial assets and liabilities at November 28, 2014 was determined using the following inputs (in thousands): Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets (Level 1) Total Assets: Cash equivalents: Money market mutual funds Time deposits Short-term investments: Corporate bonds and commercial paper Foreign government securities Marketable equity securities Municipal securities U.S. agency securities U.S. Treasury securities Prepaid expenses and other current assets: Foreign currency derivatives Other assets: Deferred compensation plan assets Interest rate swap derivatives Total assets Liabilities: Accrued expenses: Foreign currency derivatives Total liabilities $ 705,978 63,139 $ 705,978 63,139 Significant Other Observable Inputs (Level 2) $ Significant Unobservable Inputs (Level 3) — — $ — — 1,519,376 4,511 491 175,201 498,385 424,127 — — 491 — — — 1,519,376 4,511 — 175,201 498,385 424,127 — — — — — — 32,991 — 32,991 — $ 25,745 14,268 3,464,212 $ 549 — 770,157 $ 25,196 14,268 2,694,055 $ — — — $ $ 663 663 $ $ — — $ $ 663 663 $ $ — — See Note 3 for further information regarding the fair value of our financial instruments. Our fixed income available-for-sale securities consist of high quality, investment grade securities from diverse issuers with a minimum credit rating of BBB and a weighted average credit rating of AA-. We value these securities based on pricing from pricing vendors who may use quoted prices in active markets for identical assets (Level 1 inputs) or inputs other than quoted prices that are observable either directly or indirectly (Level 2 inputs) in determining fair value. However, we classify all of our fixed income available-for-sale securities as having Level 2 inputs. The valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of our financial instruments and derivatives having Level 2 inputs were derived from non-binding market consensus prices that are corroborated by observable market data, quoted market prices for similar instruments, or pricing models such as discounted cash flow techniques. Our procedures include controls to ensure that appropriate fair values are recorded such as comparing prices obtained from multiple independent sources. Our deferred compensation plan assets consist of prime money market funds and mutual funds. Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Nonrecurring Basis We also have direct investments in privately held companies accounted for under the cost method, which are periodically assessed for other-than-temporary impairment. If we determine that an other-than-temporary impairment has occurred, we write 76 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) down the investment to its fair value. We estimate fair value of our cost method investments considering available information such as pricing in recent rounds of financing, current cash positions, earnings and cash flow forecasts, recent operational performance and any other readily available market data. During fiscal 2015 and 2014, we determined there were no other-than-temporary impairments on our cost method investments. As of November 27, 2015, the carrying value of our lease receivables approximated fair value, based on Level 2 valuation inputs which include Treasury rates, London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) interest rates and applicable credit spreads. See Note 15 for further details regarding our investment in lease receivables. The fair value of our senior notes was $1.97 billion as of November 27, 2015, based on observable market prices in less active market and categorized as Level 2. See Note 16 for further details regarding our debt. NOTE 5. DERIVATIVES AND HEDGING ACTIVITIES Hedge Accounting and Hedging Programs We recognize derivative instruments and hedging activities as either assets or liabilities in our Consolidated Balance Sheets and measure them at fair value. Gains and losses resulting from changes in fair value are accounted for depending on the use of the derivative and whether it is designated and qualifies for hedge accounting. We evaluate hedge effectiveness at the inception of the hedge prospectively as well as retrospectively and record any ineffective portion of the hedging instruments in interest and other income, net on our Consolidated Statements of Income. The net gain (loss) recognized in interest and other income (expense), net for cash flow hedges due to hedge ineffectiveness was insignificant for all fiscal years presented. The time value of purchased contracts is recorded in interest and other income (expense), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. The bank counterparties to these contracts expose us to credit-related losses in the event of their nonperformance which are largely mitigated with collateral security agreements that provide for collateral to be received or posted when the net fair value of certain financial instruments fluctuates from contractually established thresholds. In addition, we enter into master netting arrangements which have the ability to further limit credit-related losses with the same counterparty by permitting net settlement of transactions. Our hedging policy also establishes maximum limits for each counterparty to mitigate any concentration of risk. Fair Value Hedging—Hedges of Interest Rate Risks During the third quarter of fiscal 2014, we entered into interest rate swaps designated as a fair value hedge related to our $900 million of 4.75% fixed interest rate senior notes due February 1, 2020 (the “2020 Notes”). In effect, the interest rate swaps convert the fixed interest rate on our 2020 Notes to a floating interest rate based on the LIBOR. Under the terms of the swaps, we will pay monthly interest at the one-month LIBOR rate plus a fixed number of basis points on the $900 million notional amount through February 1, 2020. In exchange, we will receive 4.75% fixed rate interest from the swap counterparties. See Note 16 for further details regarding our debt. The interest rate swaps are accounted for as fair value hedges and substantially offset the changes in fair value of the hedged portion of the underlying debt that are attributable to the changes in market risk. Therefore, the gains and losses related to changes in the fair value of the interest rate swaps are included in interest and other income (expense), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. The fair value of the interest rate swaps is reflected in other assets in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Cash Flow Hedging—Hedges of Forecasted Foreign Currency Revenue and Interest Rate Risks In countries outside the United States, we transact business in U.S. Dollars and in various other currencies. We may use foreign exchange option contracts or forward contracts to hedge certain cash flow exposures resulting from changes in these foreign currency exchange rates. These foreign exchange contracts, carried at fair value, have maturities of up to twelve months. We enter into these foreign exchange contracts to hedge a portion of our forecasted foreign currency denominated revenue in the normal course of business and accordingly, they are not speculative in nature. To receive hedge accounting treatment, all hedging relationships are formally documented at the inception of the hedge, and the hedges must be highly effective in offsetting changes to future cash flows on hedged transactions. We record changes in 77 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) the intrinsic value of these cash flow hedges in accumulated other comprehensive income in our Consolidated Balance Sheets, until the forecasted transaction occurs. When the forecasted transaction occurs, we reclassify the related gain or loss on the cash flow hedge to revenue. In the event the underlying forecasted transaction does not occur, or it becomes probable that it will not occur, we reclassify the gain or loss on the related cash flow hedge from accumulated other comprehensive income to interest and other income (expense), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income at that time. If we do not elect hedge accounting, or the contract does not qualify for hedge accounting treatment, the changes in fair value from period to period are recorded in interest and other income (expense), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. In December 2014, prior to issuing new long-term fixed rate debt, we entered into an interest rate lock agreement on a notional amount of $600 million to hedge against the variability of future interest payments due to changes in the benchmark interest rate. This instrument was designated as a cash flow hedge. Upon issuance of our $1 billion of 3.25% senior notes due February 1, 2025 (the “2025 Notes”) in January 2015, we terminated the instrument and incurred a loss of $16.2 million. This loss was recorded in the stockholders’ equity section in our Consolidated Balance Sheets in accumulated other comprehensive income and will be reclassified to interest expense over a ten-year term consistent with the impact of the hedged item. See Note 16 for further details regarding our debt. For fiscal 2015, there were no net gains or losses recognized in other income relating to hedges of forecasted transactions that did not occur. In fiscal 2014 and 2013 these net gains or losses were insignificant. Balance Sheet Hedging—Hedges of Foreign Currency Assets and Liabilities We also hedge our net recognized foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities with foreign exchange forward contracts to reduce the risk that the value of these assets and liabilities will be adversely affected by changes in exchange rates. These contracts hedge assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies and are carried at fair value with changes in the fair value recorded to interest and other income (expense), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. These contracts do not subject us to material balance sheet risk due to exchange rate movements because gains and losses on these derivatives are intended to offset gains and losses on the assets and liabilities being hedged. As of November 27, 2015, total notional amounts of outstanding contracts were $228.3 million which included the notional equivalent of $75.8 million in Euros, $44.3 million in British Pounds, $37.8 million in Australian Dollars, $28.8 million in Japanese Yen, and $41.6 million in other foreign currencies. As of November 28, 2014, total notional amounts of outstanding contracts were $235.5 million which included the notional equivalent of $137.2 million in Euros, $30.9 million in British Pounds and $67.4 million in other foreign currencies. At November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014, the outstanding balance sheet hedging derivatives had maturities of 180 days or less. The fair value of derivative instruments on our Consolidated Balance Sheets as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 were as follows (in thousands): 2015 Fair Value Asset Derivatives Derivatives designated as hedging instruments: Foreign exchange option contracts (1)(3) Interest rate swap (2) Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments: Foreign exchange forward contracts (1) Total derivatives $ $ 16,979 19,821 2,147 38,947 2014 Fair Value Liability Derivatives $ $ Fair Value Asset Derivatives — — 2,154 2,154 $ $ 31,275 14,268 1,716 47,259 Fair Value Liability Derivatives $ $ — — 663 663 _________________________________________ (1) (2) (3) Included in prepaid expenses and other current assets and accrued expenses for asset derivatives and liability derivatives, respectively, on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Included in other assets on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Hedging effectiveness expected to be recognized to income within the next twelve months. 78 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) The effect of foreign currency derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges and of foreign currency derivative instruments not designated as hedges in our Consolidated Statements of Income for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were as follows (in thousands): 2015 Foreign Exchange Option Contracts 2014 Foreign Exchange Forward Contracts Foreign Exchange Option Contracts 2013 Foreign Exchange Forward Contracts Foreign Exchange Option Contracts Foreign Exchange Forward Contracts Derivatives in cash flow hedging relationships: Net gain (loss) recognized in other comprehensive income, net of tax(1) $ 39,825 $ Net gain (loss) reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income into income, net of tax(2) $ 56,336 $ Net gain (loss) recognized in income(3) $ (17,423) $ Derivatives not designated as hedging relationships: Net gain (loss) recognized in income(4) $ — $ — $ 41,993 $ — $ 34,677 $ — — $ 18,705 $ $ (14,962) $ — $ 35,914 $ $ (21,098) $ — — 4,430 $ — $ — 466 $ — $ — 2,129 _________________________________________ (1) (2) (3) (4) Net change in the fair value of the effective portion classified in other comprehensive income. Effective portion classified as revenue. Ineffective portion and amount excluded from effectiveness testing classified in interest and other income (expense), net. Classified in interest and other income (expense), net. Net gains (losses) recognized in interest and other income (expense), net relating to balance sheet hedging for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were as follows (in thousands): Gain (loss) on foreign currency assets and liabilities: Net realized gain (loss) recognized in other income Net unrealized gain (loss) recognized in other income $ Gain (loss) on hedges of foreign currency assets and liabilities: Net realized gain recognized in other income Net unrealized gain (loss) recognized in other income Net gain (loss) recognized in interest and other income (expense), net 79 $ 2015 2014 2013 (10,952) $ 3,815 (7,137) (21,559) $ 17,217 (4,342) (4,783) 2,751 (2,032) 5,490 (1,060) 4,430 (2,707) $ 1,324 (858) 466 (3,876) $ 1,835 294 2,129 97 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) NOTE 6. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT Property and equipment, net consisted of the following as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 (in thousands): 2015 Computers and equipment Furniture and fixtures Server hardware under capital lease Capital projects in-progress Leasehold improvements Land Buildings Total Less accumulated depreciation and amortization Property and equipment, net $ $ 2014 940,057 $ 89,434 — 12,394 247,535 70,728 398,468 1,758,616 (971,195) 787,421 $ 855,218 82,385 25,703 68,652 240,506 106,283 320,410 1,699,157 (914,034) 785,123 Depreciation and amortization expense of property and equipment for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was $146.3 million, $144.2 million and $144.7 million, respectively. In the second quarter of fiscal 2015, management approved a plan to sell land and an unoccupied building located in San Jose, California. The total carrying value of the property assets was $36.3 million which mostly pertained to the land. The decision to sell these property assets was largely based upon a general lack of operational needs for the building and land, and recent improvements in market conditions for commercial real estate in the area. We began to actively market the assets during the second quarter of fiscal 2015 and finalized the sale of these assets on September 23, 2015 for total proceeds of $57.8 million. The gain on the sale of the property assets was included in interest and other income (expense), net in our Consolidated Statements of Income. In August 2014, we exercised our option to purchase the East and West Towers of our corporate headquarter offices for a total purchase price of $143.2 million. We capitalized the East and West Towers as property and equipment on our Consolidated Balance Sheets at $144.1 million, the lesser of cost or fair value, which represented the total purchase price plus other direct costs associated with the purchase. These buildings are depreciated over their useful life of 40 years on a straight-line basis. NOTE 7. GOODWILL AND PURCHASED AND OTHER INTANGIBLES Goodwill by reportable segment and activity for the years ended November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 was as follows (in thousands): 2013 Digital Media Digital Marketing Print and Publishing Goodwill $2,049,726 2,463,828 258,427 $4,771,981 (1) Acquisitions $ $ 12,510 — — 12,510 Other (4,838) $2,057,398 (57,687) 2,406,141 (4) 258,423 $ (62,529) $4,721,962 $ _________________________________________ (1) 2014 Amounts primarily consist of foreign currency translation adjustments. 80 (1) Acquisitions $ 747,964 — — $ 747,964 Other 2015 (9,060) $2,796,302 (93,983) 2,312,158 (2) 258,421 $ (103,045) $5,366,881 $ Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Purchased and other intangible assets by reportable segment as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 were as follows (in thousands): 2015 Digital Media Digital Marketing Print and Publishing Purchased and other intangible assets, net $ $ 291,779 218,054 174 510,007 2014 $ $ 147,182 321,086 1,394 469,662 Purchased and other intangible assets subject to amortization as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 were as follows (in thousands): Purchased technology Customer contracts and relationships Trademarks Acquired rights to use technology Localization Other intangibles Total other intangible assets Purchased and other intangible assets, net 2015 2014 Cost Accumulated Amortization Net Cost Accumulated Amortization Net $ (104,704) $ $ (204,578) $ (41,175) (100,278) (358) (7,793) $ (354,182) $ 94,349 302,061 40,044 43,924 1,142 28,487 415,658 $ $ $ 199,053 506,639 81,219 144,202 1,500 36,280 769,840 405,208 376,994 67,268 148,836 549 3,163 596,810 $ (264,697) $ $ (143,330) $ (36,516) (86,258) (382) (1,173) $ (267,659) $ 140,511 233,664 30,752 62,578 167 1,990 329,151 $ 968,893 $ (458,886) $ 510,007 $ 1,002,018 $ (532,356) $ 469,662 $ $ $ In fiscal 2015, certain purchased intangibles associated with our acquisitions of Omniture, Efficient Frontier and Day Software Holding AG became fully amortized and were removed from the Consolidated Balance Sheets. In fiscal 2014, certain purchased intangibles associated with our acquisitions of Efficient Frontier and Day Software Holding AG became fully amortized and were removed from the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Amortization expense related to purchased and other intangible assets was $174.5 million and $152.7 million for fiscal 2015 and 2014, respectively. Of these amounts, $104.4 million and $100.2 million were included in cost of sales for fiscal 2015 and 2014, respectively. In fiscal 2013, we acquired rights to use certain technology for $51.8 million, of which $26.5 million was related to historical use of licensing rights and was expensed as cost of product revenue. Excluding the expense associated with historical use of the acquired rights to use the technology, amortization expense was $156.9 million, of which $105.7 million was included in cost of sales for fiscal 2013. 81 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Purchased and other intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives of 1 to 14 years. As of November 27, 2015, we expect amortization expense in future periods to be as follows (in thousands): Purchased Technology Fiscal Year 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Thereafter Total expected amortization expense $ $ 30,745 23,401 16,431 9,794 7,584 6,394 94,349 Other Intangible Assets $ 108,716 97,822 87,028 60,499 30,412 31,181 415,658 $ NOTE 8. ACCRUED EXPENSES Accrued expenses as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 consisted of the following (in thousands): 2015 Accrued compensation and benefits Sales and marketing allowances Accrued corporate marketing Taxes payable Royalties payable Accrued interest expense Other Accrued expenses $ $ 2014 312,776 66,876 38,512 27,996 23,334 26,538 182,332 678,364 $ 320,679 75,627 28,369 24,658 15,073 22,621 196,839 683,866 $ Other primarily includes general corporate accruals for technical support and local and regional expenses. Other is also comprised of deferred rent related to office locations with rent escalations and foreign currency liability derivatives. NOTE 9. INCOME TAXES Income before income taxes for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 consisted of the following (in thousands): 2015 Domestic Foreign Income before income taxes $ $ 82 589,371 284,410 873,781 2014 $ $ 191,563 169,813 361,376 2013 $ $ 132,916 223,225 356,141 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) The provision for income taxes for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 consisted of the following (in thousands): 2015 Current: United States federal Foreign State and local Total current Deferred: United States federal Foreign State and local Total deferred Tax expense attributable to employee stock plans Provision for income taxes $ $ 204,834 $ 52,125 (14,975) 241,984 (31,011) (9,368) (25,511) (65,890) 68,136 244,230 $ 2014 2013 $ (53,985) 65,609 3,317 14,941 (24,090) (12,895) (6,476) (43,461) 53,223 92,981 $ 24,139 (6,215) (7,328) 10,596 40,619 66,156 26,822 51,684 4,713 83,219 Total income tax expense differs from the expected tax expense (computed by multiplying the U.S. federal statutory rate of 35% by income before income taxes) as a result of the following (in thousands): Computed “expected” tax expense State tax expense, net of federal benefit Tax credits Differences between statutory rate and foreign effective tax rate Change in deferred tax asset valuation allowance Stock-based compensation (net of tax deduction) Resolution of income tax examinations Domestic manufacturing deduction benefit Tax charge for licensing acquired company technology to foreign subsidiaries Other, net Provision for income taxes 83 $ $ 2015 2014 2013 305,824 $ (8,316) (25,967) (90,063) — 9,623 (17,595) (16,800) 80,015 7,509 244,230 $ 126,481 $ (4,411) (1,166) (33,769) — 8,688 (1,896) (6,272) — 5,326 92,981 $ 124,649 (6,304) (29,087) (39,678) 514 9,783 (8,421) (2,929) 18,935 (1,306) 66,156 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Deferred Tax Assets and Liabilities The tax effects of the temporary differences that gave rise to significant portions of the deferred tax assets and liabilities as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 are presented below (in thousands): Deferred tax assets: Acquired technology Reserves and accruals Deferred revenue Unrealized losses on investments Stock-based compensation Net operating loss carryforwards of acquired companies Credit carryforwards Capitalized expenses Benefits relating to tax positions Other Total gross deferred tax assets Deferred tax asset valuation allowance Total deferred tax assets Deferred tax liabilities: Depreciation and amortization Undistributed earnings of foreign subsidiaries Acquired intangible assets Total deferred tax liabilities Net deferred tax liabilities $ $ 2015 2014 9,071 $ 33,251 17,110 5,505 59,103 20,877 57,568 17,566 43,095 20,648 283,794 (21,286) 262,508 9,477 46,569 16,311 6,723 58,501 9,082 41,419 — 9,540 10,974 208,596 (22,100) 186,496 62,143 249,159 159,415 470,717 208,209 73,295 221,845 138,392 433,532 247,036 $ The deferred tax assets and liabilities for fiscal 2015 and 2014 include amounts related to various acquisitions. The total change in deferred tax assets and liabilities includes changes that are recorded to other comprehensive income, additional paidin capital, goodwill, unrecognized tax benefits and retained earnings. We provide U.S. income taxes on the earnings of foreign subsidiaries unless the subsidiaries’ earnings are considered permanently reinvested outside the United States. To the extent that the foreign earnings previously treated as permanently reinvested are repatriated, the related U.S. tax liability may be reduced by any foreign income taxes paid on these earnings. As of November 27, 2015, the cumulative amount of earnings upon which U.S. income taxes have not been provided is approximately $3.7 billion. The unrecognized deferred tax liability for these earnings is approximately $1.0 billion. As of November 27, 2015, we have net operating loss carryforwards of approximately $52.1 million for federal, $16.4 million for state, and $7.6 million for foreign. We also have state and foreign tax credit carryforwards of approximately $55.0 million and $21.8 million, respectively. The net operating loss carryforward assets and tax credits will expire in various years from fiscal 2016 through 2034. The state tax credit carryforwards can be carried forward indefinitely. The net operating loss carryforward assets and certain credits are subject to an annual limitation under Internal Revenue Code Section 382, but are expected to be fully realized. In addition, we have been tracking certain deferred tax attributes of approximately $55.0 million which have not been recorded in the financial statements pursuant to accounting standards related to stock-based compensation. These amounts are no longer included in our gross or net deferred tax assets. Pursuant to these standards, the benefit of these deferred tax assets will be recorded to equity if and when they reduce taxes payable. 84 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) As of November 27, 2015, a valuation allowance of $21.3 million has been established for certain deferred tax assets related to the impairment of investments and certain state and foreign assets. For fiscal 2015, the total change in the valuation allowance was immaterial. Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes During fiscal 2015 and 2014, our aggregate changes in our total gross amount of unrecognized tax benefits are summarized as follows (in thousands): Beginning balance Gross increases in unrecognized tax benefits – prior year tax positions Gross increases in unrecognized tax benefits – current year tax positions Settlements with taxing authorities Lapse of statute of limitations Foreign exchange gains and losses Ending balance $ $ 2015 2014 148,848 $ 3,784 129,358 (11,548) (2,687) (9,037) 258,718 $ 136,098 144 18,877 (995) (1,630) (3,646) 148,848 As of November 27, 2015, the combined amount of accrued interest and penalties related to tax positions taken on our tax returns and included in non-current income taxes payable was approximately $27.8 million. We file income tax returns in the United States on a federal basis and in many U.S. state and foreign jurisdictions. We are subject to the continual examination of our income tax returns by the IRS and other domestic and foreign tax authorities. Our major tax jurisdictions are Ireland, California and the United States. For Ireland, California and the United States, the earliest fiscal years open for examination are 2008, 2010 and 2010, respectively. We regularly assess the likelihood of outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes and have reserved for potential adjustments that may result from the current examinations. We believe such estimates to be reasonable; however, there can be no assurance that the final determination of any of these examinations will not have an adverse effect on our operating results and financial position. The timing of the resolution of income tax examinations is highly uncertain as are the amounts and timing of tax payments that are part of any audit settlement process. These events could cause large fluctuations in the balance sheet classification of current and non-current assets and liabilities. We believe that within the next 12 months, it is reasonably possible that either certain audits will conclude or statutes of limitations on certain income tax examination periods will expire, or both. Given the uncertainties described above, we can only determine a range of estimated potential decreases in underlying unrecognized tax benefits ranging from $0 to approximately $10 million. NOTE 10. RESTRUCTURING Fiscal 2014 Restructuring Plan In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, in order to better align our global resources for Digital Media and Digital Marketing, we initiated a restructuring plan to vacate our Research and Development facility in China and our Sales and Marketing facility in Russia. This plan consisted of reductions of approximately 350 full-time positions and we recorded restructuring charges of approximately $21.0 million through fiscal 2015 related to ongoing termination benefits for the positions eliminated. The amount accrued for the fair value of future contractual obligations under these operating leases was insignificant. During the first quarter of fiscal 2015 we vacated both of these facilities and as of November 27, 2015 we consider the Fiscal 2014 Restructuring Plan to be substantially complete. Other Restructuring Plans During the past several years, we have implemented Other Restructuring Plans consisting of reductions in workforce and the consolidation of facilities to better align our resources around our business strategies. As of November 27, 2015, we considered our Other Restructuring Plans to be substantially complete. We continue to make cash outlays to settle obligations under these plans, however the current impact to our Consolidated Financial Statements is not material. 85 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Summary of Restructuring Plans The following table sets forth a summary of restructuring activities related to all of our restructuring plans described above during fiscal 2015 (in thousands): November 28, 2014 Fiscal 2014 Restructuring Plan: Termination benefits Cost of closing redundant facilities Other Restructuring Plans: Termination benefits Cost of closing redundant facilities Total restructuring plans $ $ 14,461 472 537 6,844 22,314 Costs Incurred $ 773 — — 640 1,413 $ Cash Payments $ $ Other Adjustments November 27, 2015 (16,512) $ (417) 1,290 $ (55) 12 — (120) (1,130) (18,179) $ (230) (1,819) (814) $ 187 4,535 4,734 Accrued restructuring charges of $4.7 million as of November 27, 2015 include $1.5 million recorded in accrued restructuring, current and $3.2 million related to long-term facilities obligations recorded in accrued restructuring, non-current on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. We expect to pay accrued termination benefits through fiscal 2016 and facilities-related liabilities under contract through fiscal 2021 of which approximately 75% will be paid through 2017. NOTE 11. BENEFIT PLANS Retirement Savings Plan In 1987, we adopted an Employee Investment Plan, qualified under Section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code, which is a retirement savings plan covering substantially all of our U.S. employees, now referred to as the Adobe 401(k) Retirement Savings Plan. Under the plan, eligible employees may contribute up to 65% of their pretax or after-tax salary, subject to the Internal Revenue Service annual contribution limits. In fiscal 2015, we matched 50% of the first 6% of the employee’s eligible compensation. We contributed $25.7 million, $24.8 million and $22.3 million in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Adobe is under no obligation to continue matching future employee contributions and at the Company’s discretion may change its practices at any time. Deferred Compensation Plan On September 21, 2006, the Board of Directors approved the Adobe Systems Incorporated Deferred Compensation Plan, effective December 2, 2006 (the “Deferred Compensation Plan”). The Deferred Compensation Plan is an unfunded, non-qualified, deferred compensation arrangement under which certain executives and members of the Board of Directors are able to defer a portion of their annual compensation. Participants may elect to contribute up to 75% of their base salary and 100% of other specified compensation, including commissions, bonuses, performance-based and time-based restricted stock units, and directors’ fees. Participants are able to elect the payment of benefits to begin on a specified date at least three years after the end of the plan year in which the election is made in the form of a lump sum or annual installments over five, ten or fifteen years. Upon termination of a participant’s employment with Adobe, such participant will receive a distribution in the form of a lump sum payment. All distributions will be made in cash, except for deferred performance-based and time-based restricted stock units which will be settled in stock. As of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014, the invested amounts under the Deferred Compensation Plan total $32.1 million and $25.7 million, respectively and were recorded as other assets on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. As of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014, $39.6 million and $31.0 million, respectively, was recorded as long-term liabilities to recognize undistributed deferred compensation due to employees. 86 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) NOTE 12. STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION Our stock-based compensation programs are long-term retention programs that are intended to attract, retain and provide incentives for employees, officers and directors, and to align stockholder and employee interests. We have the following stockbased compensation plans and programs: Restricted Stock Unit Plans We currently grant restricted stock units to eligible employees under our 2003 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended (“2003 Plan”). In February 2015, the Executive Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors retired our remaining share reserves under the 2005 Equity Incentive Assumption Plan (“2005 Assumption Plan”). Restricted stock units granted under these plans as part of our annual review process vest annually over three years. Other restricted stock units granted under these plans generally vest over four years, the majority of which vest 25% annually. Certain grants have other vesting periods approved by our Board of Directors or an authorized committee of the Board of Directors. We grant performance awards to officers and key employees under our 2003 Plan. Performance awards granted under this plan between fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2012 vest annually over three years, and performance awards granted in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 cliff-vest after three years. As of November 27, 2015, we had reserved 173.2 million shares of common stock for issuance under our 2003 Plan and had 48.5 million shares available for grant. Employee Stock Purchase Plan Our 1997 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”) allows eligible employee participants to purchase shares of our common stock at a discount through payroll deductions. The ESPP consists of a twenty-four month offering period with four six-month purchase periods in each offering period. Employees purchase shares in each purchase period at 85% of the market value of our common stock at either the beginning of the offering period or the end of the purchase period, whichever price is lower. The ESPP will continue until the earlier of (i) termination by the Board or (ii) the date on which all of the shares available for issuance under the plan have been issued. As of November 27, 2015, we had reserved 93.0 million shares of our common stock for issuance under the ESPP and approximately 10.8 million shares remain available for future issuance. Stock Option Plans The Executive Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors eliminated the use of stock option grants for all employees in fiscal 2012. Stock option grants to non-employee directors were minimal in fiscal 2013, and in December 2013 the Board of Directors eliminated the use of option grants for directors as well. The 2003 Plan allows us to grant options to all employees, including executive officers, outside consultants and nonemployee directors. This plan will continue until the earlier of (i) termination by the Board or (ii) the date on which all of the shares available for issuance under the plan have been issued and restrictions on issued shares have lapsed. Option vesting periods are generally four years and expire seven years from the effective date of grant. Performance Share Programs On January 26, 2015, our Executive Compensation Committee approved the 2015 Performance Share Program, including the award calculation methodology, under the terms of our 2003 Equity Incentive Plan. Under our 2015 Performance Share Program (“2015 Program”), shares may be earned based on the achievement of an objective relative total stockholder return measured over a three-year performance period. The purpose of the 2015 Program is to help focus key employees on building stockholder value, provide significant award potential for achieving outstanding Company performance and enhance the ability of the Company to attract and retain highly talented and competent individuals. Performance share awards will be awarded and fully vest at the later of the three-year anniversary of the grant date on January 24, 2018 or the Executive Compensation Committee's certification of the level of achievement. Participants in the 2015 Program generally have the ability to receive up to 200% of the target number of shares originally granted. 87 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) On January 24, 2014, our Executive Compensation Committee approved the 2014 Performance Share Program, including the award calculation methodology, under the terms of our 2003 Equity Incentive Plan. Under our 2014 Performance Share Program (“2014 Program”), shares may be earned based on the achievement of an objective relative total stockholder return measured over a three-year performance period. The purpose of the 2014 Program is to help focus key employees on building stockholder value, provide significant award potential for achieving outstanding company performance and enhance the ability of Adobe to attract and retain highly talented and competent individuals. Performance share awards will be awarded and fully vest at the later of the three-year anniversary of the grant date on January 24, 2017 or the Executive Compensation Committee’s certification of the level of achievement. Participants in the 2014 Program generally have the ability to receive up to 200% of the target number of shares originally granted. Effective January 24, 2013, our Executive Compensation Committee modified our Performance Share Program by eliminating the use of qualitative performance objectives, with 100% of shares to be earned based on the achievement of an objective relative total stockholder return measured over a three-year performance period. Performance awards were granted under the 2013 Performance Share Program (“2013 Program”) pursuant to the terms of our 2003 Equity Incentive Plan. The purpose of the 2013 Program is to align key management and senior leadership with stockholders’ interests over the long term and to retain key employees. Performance share awards will be awarded and fully vest at the later of the three-year anniversary of the grant date on January 24, 2016 or the Executive Compensation Committee's certification of the level of achievement. Participants in the 2013 Program generally have the ability to receive up to 200% of the target number of shares originally granted. Issuance of Shares Upon exercise of stock options, vesting of restricted stock and performance shares, and purchases of shares under the ESPP, we will issue treasury stock. If treasury stock is not available, common stock will be issued. In order to minimize the impact of on-going dilution from exercises of stock options and vesting of restricted stock and performance shares, we instituted a stock repurchase program. See Note 13 for information regarding our stock repurchase programs. Valuation of Stock-Based Compensation Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the award. We are required to estimate forfeitures at the time of grant and revise those estimates in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. We use historical data to estimate forfeitures and record stock-based compensation expense only for those awards that are expected to vest. We use the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the fair value of ESPP shares and stock options. The determination of the fair value of stock-based payment awards on the date of grant using an option pricing model is affected by our stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of complex and subjective variables. These variables include our expected stock price volatility over the expected term of the awards, actual and projected employee stock option exercise behaviors, a risk-free interest rate and any expected dividends. We estimate the expected term of options granted by calculating the average term from our historical stock option exercise experience. We estimate the volatility of our common stock by using implied volatility in market traded options. Our decision to use implied volatility was based upon the availability of actively traded options on our common stock and our assessment that implied volatility is more representative of future stock price trends than historical volatility. We base the risk-free interest rate that we use in the option valuation model on zero-coupon yields implied by U.S. Treasury issues with remaining terms similar to the expected term on the options. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future and therefore use an expected dividend yield of zero in the option valuation model. We eliminated the use of stock option grants for all employees effective fiscal 2012, and for all of the non-employee directors effective fiscal 2014. 88 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) The expected term of ESPP shares is the average of the remaining purchase periods under each offering period. The assumptions used to value employee stock purchase rights were as follows: Fiscal Years 2015 Expected life (in years) Volatility Risk free interest rate 2014 0.5 - 2.0 26 - 30% 0.11 - 0.67% 2013 0.5 - 2.0 26 - 28% 0.06 - 0.47% 0.5 - 2.0 26 - 30% 0.09 - 0.34% Summary of Restricted Stock Units Restricted stock unit activity for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was as follows (in thousands): 2015 Beginning outstanding balance Awarded Released Forfeited Ending outstanding balance 2014 13,564 4,012 (6,561) (946) 10,069 2013 17,948 4,413 (7,502) (1,295) 13,564 18,415 7,236 (6,224) (1,479) 17,948 The weighted average grant date fair values of restricted stock units granted during fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were $75.47, $61.16 and $39.87, respectively. The total fair value of restricted stock units vested during fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was $495.1 million, $457.3 million and $249.5 million, respectively. Information regarding restricted stock units outstanding at November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 is summarized below: Number of Shares (thousands) 2015 Restricted stock units outstanding Restricted stock units vested and expected to vest 2014 Restricted stock units outstanding Restricted stock units vested and expected to vest 2013 Restricted stock units outstanding Restricted stock units vested and expected to vest Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life (years) Aggregate Intrinsic Value(*) (millions) 10,069 9,267 0.93 0.86 $ $ 928.0 842.9 13,564 12,352 0.94 0.87 $ $ 999.4 903.1 17,948 16,265 1.09 1.02 $ $ 1,019.1 920.5 _________________________________________ (*) The intrinsic value is calculated as the market value as of the end of the fiscal period. As reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market, the market values as of November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 were $92.17, $73.68 and $56.78, respectively. 89 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Summary of Performance Shares As of November 27, 2015, the shares awarded under our 2015, 2014 and 2013 Performance Share Programs are yet to be achieved.The following table sets forth the summary of performance share activity under our 2015, 2014 and 2013 Performance Share Programs for the fiscal year ended November 27, 2015 (in thousands): 2015 Shares Granted Beginning outstanding balance Awarded Forfeited Ending outstanding balance 1,517 671 (248) 1,940 2014 Maximum Shares Eligible to Receive Maximum Shares Eligible to Receive Shares Granted 3,034 1,342 (495) 3,881 2013 854 709 (46) 1,517 Maximum Shares Eligible to Receive Shares Granted 1,707 1,417 (90) 3,034 — 946 (92) 854 — 1,891 (184) 1,707 In the first quarter of fiscal 2013, the Executive Compensation Committee certified the actual performance achievement of participants in the 2012 Performance Share Program (the “2012 Program”). Based upon the achievement of specific and/or market-based performance goals outlined in the 2012 Program, participants had the ability to receive up to 150% of the target number of shares originally granted. Actual performance resulted in participants achieving 116% of target or approximately 1.3 million shares for the 2012 Program. One third of the shares under the 2012 Program vested in the first quarter of fiscal 2013 and the remaining two thirds vested evenly on the following two anniversaries of the grant if not forfeited by the recipient. The following table sets forth the summary of performance share activity under our performance share programs prior to 2013, based upon share awards actually achieved, for the fiscal years ended November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 (in thousands): 2015 Beginning outstanding balance Achieved Released Forfeited Ending outstanding balance 2014 354 — (354) — — 2013 861 — (486) (21) 354 388 1,279 (665) (141) 861 The total fair value of performance awards vested during fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was $26.1 million, $28.7 million and $25.4 million, respectively. Information regarding performance shares outstanding at November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 is summarized below: Number of Shares (thousands) 2014 Performance shares outstanding Performance shares vested and expected to vest 2013 Performance shares outstanding Performance shares vested and expected to vest _________________________________________ 90 Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life (years) Aggregate Intrinsic Value(*) (millions) 354 348 0.16 0.16 $ $ 26.1 25.5 861 817 0.58 0.56 $ $ 48.9 46.3 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) (*) The intrinsic value is calculated as the market value as of the end of the fiscal period. As reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market, the market values as of November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 were $73.68 and $56.78, respectively. Summary of Employee Stock Purchase Plan Shares The weighted average subscription date fair value of shares under the ESPP during fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were $20.81, $17.02 and $11.40, respectively. Employees purchased 2.1 million shares at an average price of $52.37, 2.9 million shares at an average price of $34.76, and 3.4 million shares at an average price of $25.71, respectively, for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013. The intrinsic value of shares purchased during fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was $53.9 million, $93.4 million and $58.5 million, respectively. The intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the market value on the date of purchase and the purchase price of the shares. Summary of Stock Options There were no stock option grants during fiscal 2015 and 2014. Stock option activity under our stock option program for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was as follows (shares in thousands): Outstanding Options Weighted Average Exercise Price Number of Shares November 30, 2012 Granted Exercised Cancelled Increase due to acquisition November 29, 2013 Granted Exercised Cancelled Increase due to acquisition November 28, 2014 Granted Exercised Cancelled Increase due to acquisition November 27, 2015 24,517 25 (15,872) (1,584) 273 7,359 — (4,055) (153) 22 3,173 — (1,900) (34) 88 1,327 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 32.09 45.03 32.15 37.37 6.82 29.93 — 30.88 25.37 29.44 28.92 — 28.83 20.90 14.38 28.28 The weighted average fair value of options granted during fiscal 2013 was $8.64. The total intrinsic value of options exercised during fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 was $92.3 million, $141.3 million and $181.8 million, respectively. The intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the market value on the date of exercise and the exercise price of the shares. 91 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Information regarding stock options outstanding at November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 is summarized below: Weighted Average Exercise Price Number of Shares (thousands) 2015 Options outstanding Options vested and expected to vest Options exercisable 2014 Options outstanding Options vested and expected to vest Options exercisable 2013 Options outstanding Options vested and expected to vest Options exercisable Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life (years) Aggregate Intrinsic Value(*) (millions) 1,327 1,319 1,214 $ $ $ 28.28 28.39 30.08 2.67 2.66 2.40 $ $ $ 84.8 84.1 75.4 3,173 3,153 2,786 $ $ $ 28.92 29.00 30.24 3.19 3.17 2.85 $ $ $ 142.0 140.9 121.0 7,359 7,242 5,752 $ $ $ 29.93 30.05 31.28 3.22 3.18 2.65 $ $ $ 197.6 193.6 146.7 _________________________________________ (*) The intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the market value as of the end of the fiscal period and the exercise price of the shares. As reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market, the market values as of November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 were $92.17, $73.68 and $56.78, respectively. Grants to Executive Officers All equity awards granted to current executive officers are made after a review by and with the approval of the Executive Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors. Grants to Non-Employee Directors The 2003 Plan provides for the granting of non-qualified stock options and restricted stock units to non-employee directors. The initial equity grant to a new non-employee director is a restricted stock unit award having an aggregate value of $0.3 million based on the average stock price over the 30 calendar days ending on the day before the date of grant and vest 100% on the day preceding the next annual meeting. The actual target grant value will be prorated based on the number of days remaining before the next annual meeting or the date of the first anniversary of our last annual meeting if the next annual meeting is not yet scheduled. Annual equity grants to non-employee directors shall have an aggregate value of $0.3 million as based on the average stock price over the 30 calendar days ending on the day before the date of grant and vest 100% on the day preceding the next annual meeting. Starting in fiscal 2014, we eliminated the use of non-qualified stock options for our non-employee directors and restricted stock units became the primary form of their annual equity grants. Restricted stock units granted to directors for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were as follows (in thousands): 2015 Restricted stock units granted to existing directors Restricted stock units granted to new directors 2014 41 — 92 2013 48 — 36 14 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) As part of the annual equity awards process in 2013, there were approximately 25 thousand options granted to non-employee directors with a $45.03 exercise price, equal to the fair market value of our common stock on the date of grant. These options vested 100% on the day preceding the fiscal 2014 annual meeting and had a seven-year term. Compensation Costs We recognize the estimated compensation cost of restricted stock units, net of estimated forfeitures, on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the entire award, which is generally the vesting period. The estimated compensation cost is based on the fair value of our common stock on the date of grant. We recognize the estimated compensation cost of performance shares, net of estimated forfeitures. The fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 awards are earned upon achievement of an objective total stockholder return measure at the end of the three-year performance period, as described above, and are valued using a Monte Carlo Simulation model. The fair value of the awards was fixed at grant date and amortized over the longer of the remaining performance or service period. For the fiscal 2012 performance shares, expense is being recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for each vesting tranche of the award. As of November 27, 2015, there was $394.1 million of unrecognized compensation cost, adjusted for estimated forfeitures, related to non-vested stock-based awards which will be recognized over a weighted average period of 1.5 years. Total unrecognized compensation cost will be adjusted for future changes in estimated forfeitures. Total stock-based compensation costs that have been included in our Consolidated Statements of Income for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were as follows (in thousands): Income Statement Classifications Cost of Revenue– Subscription Cost of Revenue– Services and Support Research and Development Sales and Marketing General and Administrative Total(1) Option Grants and Stock Purchase Rights 2015 2014 2013 $ $ $ 1,449 1,855 2,059 $ $ $ 5,185 4,000 3,413 $ $ $ 14,082 15,125 18,188 $ $ $ 18,360 17,706 21,283 $ $ $ 4,790 6,476 8,410 $ $ $ 43,866 45,162 53,353 $ $ $ 6,481 5,878 5,052 $ $ $ 6,446 6,619 6,961 $ $ $ 104,624 107,029 102,464 $ $ $ 109,908 102,909 101,423 $ $ $ 66,709 66,104 59,734 $ $ $ 294,168 288,539 275,634 Restricted Stock and Performance Share Awards 2015 2014 2013 _________________________________________ (1) During fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, we recorded tax benefits of $68.8 million, $72.4 million and $70.7 million, respectively. 93 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) NOTE 13. STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Comprehensive Income (Loss) The components of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) and activity, net of related taxes, for fiscal 2015 were as follows (in thousands): November 28, 2014 Net unrealized gains on available-for-sale securities: Unrealized gains on available-for-sale securities Unrealized losses on available-for-sale securities Total net unrealized gains on available-for-sale securities Net unrealized gains on derivative instruments designated as hedging instruments Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustments Total accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes $ Increase / Decrease 8,237 $ (609) 7,628 28,655 (44,377) $ Reclassification Adjustments (2,386) $ (6,840) (9,226) November 27, 2015 (3,309) 354 (2,955) (55,535) 29,795 (123,065) $ (1) (2) 2,915 (167,442) — (8,094) $ (102,496) $ (58,490) 2,542 (7,095) (4,553) $ (169,080) _________________________________________ (1) (2) Reclassification adjustments for gains / losses on available-for-sale securities are classified in interest and other income (expense), net. Reclassification adjustments for loss on the interest rate lock agreement and gains / losses on other derivative instruments are classified in interest and other income (expense), net and revenue, respectively. The following table sets forth the taxes related to each component of other comprehensive income for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands): 2015 Available-for-sale securities: Unrealized gains / losses Reclassification adjustments Subtotal available-for-sale securities Derivatives designated as hedging instruments: Unrealized gains on derivative instruments* Reclassification adjustments* Subtotal derivatives designated as hedging instruments Foreign currency translation adjustments Total taxes, other comprehensive income (loss) $ 2014 (154) $ — (154) 6,147 (550) 5,597 (3,378) $ 2,065 $ 2013 1 $ (8) (7) — — — (1,868) (1,875) $ 169 (2) 167 — — — 2,789 2,956 _________________________________________ (*) Taxes related to derivative instruments other than the interest rate lock agreement were zero based on the tax jurisdiction where these derivative instruments were executed. Stock Repurchase Program To facilitate our stock repurchase program, designed to return value to our stockholders and minimize dilution from stock issuances, we may repurchase shares in the open market or enter into structured repurchase agreements with third parties. In the first quarter of fiscal 2015, the Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program granting the Company authority to repurchase up to $2 billion in common stock through the end of fiscal 2017. 94 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) During fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, we entered into several structured stock repurchase agreements with large financial institutions, whereupon we provided them with prepayments totaling $625.0 million, $600.0 million, and $1.1 billion, respectively. Of the $625.0 million prepayments during fiscal 2015, $425.0 million was under the new $2 billion stock repurchase program and the remaining $200.0 million was under the previous $2 billion authority. The $600.0 million and $1.1 billion prepayments during fiscal 2014 and 2013 were under the previous $2 billion stock repurchase authority. We enter into these agreements in order to take advantage of repurchasing shares at a guaranteed discount to the Volume Weighted Average Price (“VWAP”) of our common stock over a specified period of time. We only enter into such transactions when the discount that we receive is higher than our estimate of the foregone return on our cash prepayments to the financial institutions. There were no explicit commissions or fees on these structured repurchases. Under the terms of the agreements, there is no requirement for the financial institutions to return any portion of the prepayment to us. The financial institutions agree to deliver shares to us at monthly intervals during the contract term. The parameters used to calculate the number of shares deliverable are: the total notional amount of the contract, the number of trading days in the contract, the number of trading days in the interval and the average VWAP of our stock during the interval less the agreed upon discount. During fiscal 2015, we repurchased approximately 8.1 million shares at an average price of $77.38 through structured repurchase agreements entered into during fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014. During fiscal 2014, we repurchased approximately 10.9 million shares at an average price of $63.48 through structured repurchase agreements entered into during fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013. During fiscal 2013, we repurchased approximately 21.6 million shares at an average price per share of $46.47 through structured repurchase agreements entered into during fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2012. For fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, the prepayments were classified as treasury stock on our Consolidated Balance Sheets at the payment date, though only shares physically delivered to us by November 27, 2015, November 28, 2014 and November 29, 2013 were excluded from the computation of earnings per share. As of November 27, 2015, $38.2 million of prepayments remained under the agreement. Subsequent to November 27, 2015, as part of our $2 billion stock repurchase program, we entered into a structured stock repurchase agreement with a large financial institution whereupon we provided them with a prepayment of $150 million. This amount will be classified as treasury stock on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Upon completion of the $150 million stock repurchase agreement, $1.43 billion remains under our current authority. NOTE 14. NET INCOME PER SHARE Basic net income per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period, excluding unvested restricted stock. Diluted net income per share is based upon the weighted average common shares outstanding for the period plus dilutive potential common shares, including unvested restricted stock and stock options using the treasury stock method. The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted net income per share for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands, except per share data): 2015 Net income Shares used to compute basic net income per share Dilutive potential common shares: Unvested restricted stock and performance share awards Stock options Shares used to compute diluted net income per share Basic net income per share Diluted net income per share $ $ $ 95 629,551 498,764 7,389 1,011 507,164 1.26 1.24 2014 $ $ $ 268,395 497,867 8,586 2,027 508,480 0.54 0.53 2013 $ $ $ 289,985 501,372 8,736 3,368 513,476 0.58 0.56 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) For fiscal 2015, there were no options to purchase shares of common stock with exercise prices greater than the average fair market value of our stock of $79.22 that would have been anti-dilutive. For fiscal 2014 and 2013, options to purchase shares of common stock with exercise prices greater than the average fair market value of our stock of $65.93 and $45.08, respectively, were not included in the calculation because the effect would have been anti-dilutive. The number of shares of common stock under these options was immaterial. NOTE 15. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES Lease Commitments We lease certain of our facilities and some of our equipment under non-cancellable operating lease arrangements that expire at various dates through 2028. We also have one land lease that expires in 2091. Rent expense includes base contractual rent and variable costs such as building expenses, utilities, taxes, insurance and equipment rental. Rent expense for these leases was approximately $92.9 million, $111.1 million, and $119.0 million in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013. Our sublease income was immaterial for all periods presented. We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the Almaden Tower and the East and West Towers. We own the land and the East and West Tower buildings, and lease the Almaden Tower building. See Note 6 for discussion of our East and West Towers purchase. The lease agreement for the Almaden Tower is effective through March 2017. We are the investors in the lease receivable related to the Almaden Tower lease in the amount of $80.4 million, which is recorded as investment in lease receivable on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. As of November 27, 2015, the carrying value of the lease receivable related to the Almaden Tower approximated fair value. Under the agreement for the Almaden Tower, we have the option to purchase the building at any time during the lease term for $103.6 million. If we purchase the building, the investment in the lease receivable may be credited against the purchase price. The residual value guarantee under the Almaden Tower obligation is $89.4 million. The Almaden Tower lease is subject to standard covenants including a certain financial ratio that is reported to the lessor quarterly. As of November 27, 2015, we were in compliance with all of the covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the building for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the building. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the building, we are bound to arrange the sale of the building to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the residual value guarantee amount less our investment in lease receivable. The Almaden Tower lease qualifies for operating lease accounting treatment and, as such, the building and the related obligation are not included in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. Unconditional Purchase Obligations Our purchase obligations consist of agreements to purchase goods and services entered into in the ordinary course of business. 96 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) The following table summarizes our non-cancellable unconditional purchase obligations and operating leases for each of the next five years and thereafter as of November 27, 2015 (in thousands): Operating Leases Future Minimum Lease Payments Purchase Obligations Fiscal Year 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Thereafter Total $ $ 341,288 62,915 11,730 3,795 59 — 419,787 $ $ 41,192 32,138 27,795 24,437 21,416 46,569 193,547 Future Minimum Sublease Income $ $ 1,678 1,579 1,257 1,309 1,345 1,198 8,366 The table above includes operating lease commitments related to our restructured facilities. See Note 10 for information regarding our restructuring charges. Royalties We have royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue. Royalty expense, which was recorded under our cost of revenue on our Consolidated Statements of Income, was approximately $62.3 million, $45.2 million and $40.2 million in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Indemnifications In the ordinary course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products and from time to time, we are subject to claims by our customers under these indemnification provisions. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations. To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is or was serving at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that reduces our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal. Legal Proceedings In connection with disputes relating to the validity or alleged infringement of third-party intellectual property rights, including patent rights, we have been, are currently and may in the future be subject to claims, negotiations or complex, protracted litigation. Intellectual property disputes and litigation may be very costly and can be disruptive to our business operations by diverting the attention and energies of management and key technical personnel. Although we have successfully defended or resolved past litigation and disputes, we may not prevail in any ongoing or future litigation and disputes. Third-party intellectual property disputes could subject us to significant liabilities, require us to enter into royalty and licensing arrangements on unfavorable terms, prevent us from licensing certain of our products or offering certain of our services, subject us to injunctions restricting our sale of products or services, cause severe disruptions to our operations or the markets in which we compete, or require us to satisfy indemnification commitments with our customers including contractual provisions under various license arrangements and service agreements. 97 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Between May 4, 2011 and July 14, 2011, five putative class action lawsuits were filed in Santa Clara Superior Court and Alameda Superior Court in California. On September 12, 2011, the cases were consolidated into In Re High-Tech Employee Antitrust Litigation (“HTEAL”) pending in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, San Jose Division. In the consolidated complaint, Plaintiffs alleged that Adobe, along with Apple, Google, Intel, Intuit, Lucasfilm and Pixar, agreed not to recruit each other’s employees in violation of Federal and state antitrust laws. Plaintiffs claim the alleged agreements suppressed employee compensation and deprived employees of career opportunities. Plaintiffs seek injunctive relief, monetary damages, treble damages, costs and attorneys fees. All defendants deny the allegations and that they engaged in any wrongdoing of any kind. On October 24, 2013, the court certified a class of all persons who worked in the technical, creative, and/or research and development fields on a salaried basis in the United States for one or more of the following: (a) Apple from March 2005 through December 2009; (b) Adobe from May 2005 through December 2009; (c) Google from March 2005 through December 2009; (d) Intel from March 2005 through December 2009; (e) Intuit from June 2007 through December 2009; (f) Lucasfilm from January 2005 through December 2009; or (g) Pixar from January 2005 through December 2009, excluding retail employees, corporate officers, members of the boards of directors, and senior executives of all defendants. During the first quarter of fiscal 2015, the parties reached an agreement to settle the litigation. In March 2015, the court granted preliminary approval of the settlement and on September 2, 2015, the court granted final approval of the settlement. We expect to incur no additional losses associated with this matter. In addition to intellectual property disputes, we are subject to legal proceedings, claims and investigations in the ordinary course of business, including claims relating to commercial, employment and other matters. Some of these disputes and legal proceedings may include speculative claims for substantial or indeterminate amounts of damages. We consider all claims on a quarterly basis in accordance with GAAP and based on known facts assess whether potential losses are considered reasonably possible, probable and estimable. Based upon this assessment, we then evaluate disclosure requirements and whether to accrue for such claims in our financial statements. This determination is then reviewed and discussed with our Audit Committee and our independent registered public accounting firm. We make a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Unless otherwise specifically disclosed in this note, we have determined that no provision for liability nor disclosure is required related to any claim against us because: (a) there is not a reasonable possibility that a loss exceeding amounts already recognized (if any) may be incurred with respect to such claim; (b) a reasonably possible loss or range of loss cannot be estimated; or (c) such estimate is immaterial. All legal costs associated with litigation are expensed as incurred. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against us. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be negatively affected by an unfavorable resolution of one or more of such proceedings, claims or investigations. In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through organizations such as the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other laws. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counterclaims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be negatively affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims. 98 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) NOTE 16. DEBT Our debt as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014 consisted of the following (in thousands): 2015 Notes Fair value of interest rate swap Adjusted carrying value of Notes Capital lease obligations Total debt and capital lease obligations Less: current portion Debt and capital lease obligations $ $ 1,887,410 19,821 1,907,231 — 1,907,231 — 1,907,231 2014 $ $ 1,496,778 14,268 1,511,046 3,269 1,514,315 603,229 911,086 Notes In February 2010, we issued $600 million of 3.25% senior notes due February 1, 2015 (the “2015 Notes”) and $900 million of 4.75% senior notes due February 1, 2020 (the “2020 Notes”). Our proceeds were $1.5 billion and were net of an issuance discount of $6.6 million. In addition, we incurred issuance costs of $10.7 million. Both the discount and issuance costs were or are being amortized to interest expense over the respective terms of the 2015 and 2020 Notes using the effective interest method. The 2015 and 2020 Notes rank equally with our other unsecured and unsubordinated indebtedness. The effective interest rate including the discount and issuance costs was 3.45% for the 2015 Notes and is 4.92% for the 2020 Notes. Interest is payable semiannually, in arrears, on February 1 and August 1, and commenced on August 1, 2010. The 2015 Notes were settled on February 1, 2015, as discussed below. In June 2014, we entered into interest rate swaps with a total notional amount of $900 million designated as a fair value hedge related to our 2020 Notes. The interest rate swaps effectively convert the fixed interest rate on our 2020 Notes to a floating interest rate based on LIBOR plus a fixed number of basis points. Under the terms of the swaps, we will pay monthly interest at the one-month LIBOR floating interest rate plus a spread of a fixed number of basis points on the $900 million notional amount. In exchange, we will receive 4.75% fixed rate interest from the swap counterparties. See Note 5 for further details regarding our interest rate swap derivatives. In December 2014, prior to issuing new long-term fixed rate debt, we entered into an interest rate lock agreement on a notional amount of $600 million to hedge against the variability of future interest payments due to changes in the benchmark interest rate. This instrument was designated as a cash flow hedge. See Note 5 for further details regarding our interest rate lock agreement. In January 2015, we issued $1 billion of 3.25% senior notes due February 1, 2025 (the “2025 Notes”). Our proceeds were approximately $989.3 million which is net of an issuance discount of $10.7 million. In addition, we incurred issuance costs of $7.9 million. Both the discount and issuance costs are being amortized to interest expense over the term of the 2025 Notes using the effective interest method. The 2025 Notes rank equally with our other unsecured and unsubordinated indebtedness. The effective interest rate including the discount, issuance costs and interest rate agreement is 3.67% for the 2025 Notes. Interest is payable semi-annually, in arrears on February 1 and August 1, commencing on August 1, 2015. A portion of the proceeds from this offering was used to repay $600 million in aggregate principal amount of the 2015 Notes plus accrued and unpaid interest due February 1, 2015. The remaining proceeds were used for general corporate purposes. As of November 27, 2015, our outstanding notes payable consists of the 2020 Notes and 2025 Notes (the “Notes”) with a total carrying value of $1.91 billion. Based on quoted prices in inactive markets, the fair value of the Notes was $1.97 billion as of November 27, 2015. The total fair value of $1.97 billion excludes the effect of fair value hedge of the 2020 Notes for which we entered into interest rate swaps as described above. 99 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) We may redeem the Notes at any time, subject to a make-whole premium. In addition, upon the occurrence of certain change of control triggering events, we may be required to repurchase the Notes, at a price equal to 101% of their principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of repurchase. The Notes also include covenants that limit our ability to grant liens on assets and to enter into sale and leaseback transactions, subject to significant allowances. As of November 27, 2015, we were in compliance with all of the covenants. In February 2015, we made semi-annual interest payments on our 2015 and 2020 Notes totaling $31.1 million. In August 2015, we made semi-annual interest payments on our 2020 and 2025 Notes totaling $38.1 million. Credit Agreement On March 2, 2012, we entered into a five-year $1 billion senior unsecured revolving credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”), providing for loans to us and certain of our subsidiaries. Pursuant to the terms of the Credit Agreement, we may, subject to the agreement of the applicable lenders, request up to an additional $500 million in commitments, for a maximum aggregate commitment of $1.5 billion. Loans under the Credit Agreement will bear interest at either (i) LIBOR plus a margin, based on our public debt ratings, ranging from 0.795% and 1.3% or (ii) the base rate, which is defined as the highest of (a) the agent’s prime rate, (b) the federal funds effective rate plus 0.50% or (c) LIBOR plus 1.00% plus a margin, based on our debt ratings, ranging from 0.00% to 0.30%. Commitment fees are payable quarterly at rates between 0.08% and 0.20% per year, also based on our debt ratings. Subject to certain conditions stated in the Credit Agreement, we and any of our subsidiaries designated as additional borrowers may borrow, prepay and re-borrow amounts under the revolving credit facility at any time during the term of the Credit Agreement. The Credit Agreement contains customary representations, warranties, affirmative and negative covenants, including a financial covenant, events of default and indemnification provisions in favor of the lenders. The negative covenants include restrictions regarding the incurrence of liens and indebtedness, certain merger and acquisition transactions, dispositions and other matters, all subject to certain exceptions. The financial covenant, based on a quarterly financial test, requires us not to exceed a maximum leverage ratio. On March 1, 2013, we exercised an option under the Credit Agreement to extend the maturity date of the Credit Agreement by one year to March 2, 2018. On July 27, 2015, we entered into an amendment to further extend the maturity date of the Credit Agreement to July 27, 2020 and reallocated the facility among the syndicate of lenders that are parties to the Credit Agreement. The facility will terminate and all amounts owing thereunder will be due and payable on the maturity date unless (a) the commitments are terminated earlier upon the occurrence of certain events, including an event of default, or (b) the maturity date is further extended upon our request, subject to the agreement of the lenders. As of November 27, 2015, there were no outstanding borrowings under this Credit Agreement and we were in compliance with all covenants. 100 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) NOTE 17. NON-OPERATING INCOME (EXPENSE) Non-operating income (expense) for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 included the following (in thousands): 2015 Interest and other income (expense), net: Interest income Foreign exchange gains (losses) Realized gains on fixed income investment Realized losses on fixed income investment Other Interest and other income (expense), net Interest expense Investment gains (losses), net: Realized investment gains Unrealized investment gains Realized investment losses Unrealized investment losses Investment gains (losses), net Non-operating income (expense), net $ $ $ $ $ $ 2014 2013 28,759 $ (20,130) 21,355 $ (18,840) 21,887 (21,001) 3,309 (354) 4,024 (97) 4,090 (1,077) 22,325 33,909 $ (64,184) $ 825 7,267 $ (59,732) $ 1,042 4,941 (67,508) 2,760 $ — (206) (1,593) 1,298 $ 912 (1,054) 1,783 1,251 (7,049) — 1,156 $ (51,309) $ — (4,015) (66,582) 961 $ (29,314) $ NOTE 18. INDUSTRY SEGMENT, GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION AND SIGNIFICANT CUSTOMERS We report segment information based on the “management” approach. The management approach designates the internal reporting used by management for making decisions and assessing performance as the source of our reportable segments. Our CEO, the chief operating decision maker, reviews revenue and gross margin information for each of our reportable segments, but does not review operating expenses on a segment by segment basis. In addition, with the exception of goodwill and intangible assets, we do not identify or allocate our assets by the reportable segments. We have the following reportable segments: • Digital Media—Our Digital Media segment provides tools and solutions that enable individuals, small and medium businesses and enterprises to create, publish, promote and monetize their digital content anywhere. Our customers include traditional content creators, web application developers and digital media professionals, as well as their management in marketing departments and agencies, companies and publishers. Our customers also include knowledge workers who create, collaborate and distribute documents. • Digital Marketing—Our Digital Marketing segment provides solutions and services for how digital advertising and marketing are created, managed, executed, measured and optimized. Our customers include digital marketers, advertisers, publishers, merchandisers, web analysts, chief marketing officers, chief information officer and chief revenue officers. • Print and Publishing—Our Print and Publishing segment addresses market opportunities ranging from the diverse authoring and publishing needs of technical and business publishing to our legacy type and OEM printing businesses. 101 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Our segment results for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 were as follows (dollars in thousands): Digital Marketing Digital Media Fiscal 2015 Revenue Cost of revenue Gross profit Gross profit as a percentage of revenue Fiscal 2014 Revenue Cost of revenue Gross profit Gross profit as a percentage of revenue Fiscal 2013 Revenue Cost of revenue Gross profit Gross profit as a percentage of revenue $ $ $ $ $ $ Print and Publishing Total 3,095,160 $ 210,587 2,884,573 $ 93% 1,508,858 $ 525,309 983,549 $ 65% 191,493 $ 8,421 183,072 $ 96% 4,795,511 744,317 4,051,194 84% 2,603,179 $ 148,958 2,454,221 $ 94% 1,355,216 $ 463,772 891,444 $ 66% 188,670 $ 9,350 179,320 $ 95% 4,147,065 622,080 3,524,985 85% 2,625,913 $ 170,788 2,455,125 $ 93% 1,228,868 $ 404,804 824,064 $ 67% 200,459 $ 10,965 189,494 $ 95% 4,055,240 586,557 3,468,683 86% The tables below list our revenue and property and equipment, net, by geographic area for fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands). With the exception of property and equipment, we do not identify or allocate our assets (including long-lived assets) by geographic area. Revenue Americas: United States Other Total Americas EMEA APAC: Japan Other Total APAC Revenue 2015 $ $ 102 2,548,024 240,020 2,788,044 1,336,448 347,740 323,279 671,019 4,795,511 2014 $ $ 2,115,148 199,221 2,314,369 1,179,864 365,570 287,262 652,832 4,147,065 2013 $ $ 1,935,429 198,953 2,134,382 1,129,180 472,110 319,568 791,678 4,055,240 Table of Contents ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) Property and Equipment Americas: United States Other Total Americas EMEA APAC: India Other Total APAC Property and equipment, net 2015 $ 2014 621,122 427 621,549 43,943 111,662 10,267 121,929 787,421 $ $ $ 651,281 656 651,937 46,380 76,428 10,378 86,806 785,123 Significant Customers For fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013 there were no customers that represented at least 10% of net revenue. In fiscal 2015 and 2014, no single customer was responsible for over 10% of our trade receivables. NOTE 19. SELECTED QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA (unaudited) 2015 (in thousands, except per share data) Revenue Gross profit Income before income taxes Net income Basic net income per share Diluted net income per share Quarter Ended February 27 May 29 August 28 November 27 $ 1,109,181 $ 942,383 $ 163,248 $ 84,888 $ 0.17 $ 0.17 $ 1,162,158 $ 976,985 $ 180,974 $ 147,493 $ 0.30 $ 0.29 $ 1,217,768 $ 1,026,783 $ 232,619 $ 174,465 $ 0.35 $ 0.34 $ 1,306,404 $ 1,105,043 $ 296,940 $ 222,705 $ 0.45 $ 0.44 2014 (in thousands, except per share data) Revenue Gross profit Income before income taxes Net income Basic net income per share Diluted net income per share Quarter Ended February 28 May 30 August 29 November 28 $ 1,000,120 $ 851,611 $ 64,892 $ 47,046 $ 0.09 $ 0.09 $ 1,068,208 $ 913,304 $ 121,271 $ 88,527 $ 0.18 $ 0.17 $ 1,005,409 $ 847,685 $ 62,938 $ 44,686 $ 0.09 $ 0.09 $ 1,073,328 $ 912,385 $ 112,275 $ 88,136 $ 0.18 $ 0.17 Our fiscal year is a 52- or 53-week year that ends on the Friday closest to November 30. Each of the fiscal quarters presented were comprised of 13 weeks. 103 Table of Contents REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM The Board of Directors and Stockholders Adobe Systems Incorporated: We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Adobe Systems Incorporated and subsidiaries as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended November 27, 2015. We also have audited Adobe Systems Incorporated’s internal control over financial reporting as of November 27, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Adobe Systems Incorporated’s management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting appearing under Item 9A. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions. A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Adobe Systems Incorporated and subsidiaries as of November 27, 2015 and November 28, 2014, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended November 27, 2015, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, Adobe Systems Incorporated maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of November 27, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the COSO. (signed) KPMG LLP Santa Clara, California January 19, 2016 104 Table of Contents ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE None. ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES Disclosure Controls and Procedures Our management has evaluated, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of November 27, 2015. Based on their evaluation as of November 27, 2015, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) were effective at the reasonable assurance level to ensure that the information required to be disclosed by us in this Annual Report on Form 10-K was (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and regulations and (ii) accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within Adobe have been detected. Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). Our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of November 27, 2015. In making this assessment, our management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal ControlIntegrated Framework (2013). Our management has concluded that, as of November 27, 2015, our internal control over financial reporting is effective based on these criteria. KPMG LLP, the independent registered public accounting firm that audited our financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, has issued an attestation report on our internal control over financial reporting, which is included herein. Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended November 27, 2015 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting. ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION None. PART III ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE The information required by this Item 10 of Form 10-K that is found in our 2016 Proxy Statement to be filed with the SEC in connection with the solicitation of proxies for the Company’s 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (“2016 Proxy Statement”) is incorporated herein by reference to our 2016 Proxy Statement. The 2016 Proxy Statement will be filed with the SEC within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this report relates. For information with respect to our executive officers, see “Executive Officers” at the end of Part I, Item 1 of this report. ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION The information required by this Item 11 of Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference to our 2016 Proxy Statement. ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS The information required by this Item 12 of Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference to our 2016 Proxy Statement. 105 Table of Contents ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE The information required by this Item13 of Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference to our 2016 Proxy Statement. ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES The information required by this Item 14 of Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference to our 2016 Proxy Statement. PART IV ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 1. Financial Statements. See Index to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K. 2. Exhibits. The exhibits listed in the accompanying Index to Exhibits are filed or incorporated by reference as part of this Form 10-K. 106 Table of Contents SIGNATURES Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized. ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED By: /s/ MARK GARRETT Mark Garrett Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer) Date: January 19, 2016 POWER OF ATTORNEY KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS, that each person whose signature appears below constitutes and appoints Shantanu Narayen and Mark Garrett, and each or any one of them, his or her lawful attorneys-in-fact and agents, for such person in any and all capacities, to sign any and all amendments to this report and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, hereby ratifying and confirming all that either of said attorneys-in-fact and agent, or substitute or substitutes, may do or cause to be done by virtue hereof. Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated. Signature Title /s/ JOHN E. WARNOCK John E. Warnock Chairman of the Board of Directors /s/ CHARLES M. GESCHKE Charles M. Geschke Chairman of the Board of Directors /s/ SHANTANU NARAYEN Shantanu Narayen /s/ MARK GARRETT Mark Garrett /s/ RICHARD T. ROWLEY Richard T. Rowley /s/ AMY BANSE Amy Banse /s/ KELLY BARLOW Kelly Barlow Date January 19, 2016 January 19, 2016 January 19, 2016 Director, President and Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer) January 19, 2016 Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer) January 19, 2016 Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer January 19, 2016 Director January 19, 2016 Director 107 Table of Contents Signature Title /s/ EDWARD W. BARNHOLT Edward W. Barnholt Director /s/ ROBERT K. BURGESS Robert K. Burgess Director /s/ FRANK CALDERONI Frank Calderoni January 19, 2016 January 19, 2016 January 19, 2016 Director /s/ MICHAEL R. CANNON Michael R. Cannon Director /s/ JAMES E. DALEY James E. Daley Director /s/ LAURA DESMOND Laura Desmond /s/ DANIEL L. ROSENSWEIG Daniel L. Rosensweig /s/ ROBERT SEDGEWICK Robert Sedgewick Date January 19, 2016 January 19, 2016 January 19, 2016 Director January 19, 2016 Director January 19, 2016 Director 108 Table of Contents SUMMARY OF TRADEMARKS The following trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated or its subsidiaries, which may be registered in the United States and/or other countries, are referenced in this Form 10-K: Acrobat Adobe Adobe Connect Adobe CreativeSync Adobe Premiere After Effects Behance Creative Cloud Creative Suite Dreamweaver EchoSign Flash Fotolia Illustrator InCopy InDesign Lightroom LiveCycle Photoshop PostScript Reader Typekit All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. 109 Table of Contents INDEX TO EXHIBITS Incorporated by Reference** Exhibit Number Exhibit Description Form Filing Date Exhibit Number SEC File No. 3.1 Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Adobe Systems Incorporated 8-K 4/26/11 3.3 000-15175 3.2 Amended and Restated Bylaws 8-K 10/30/12 3.1 000-15175 4.1 Specimen Common Stock Certificate 10-Q 6/25/14 4.1 000-15175 4.2 Form of Indenture S-3 1/15/10 4.1 333-164378 4.3 Form of Global Note for Adobe Systems Incorporated’s 4.750% Notes due 2020, together with Form of Officer’s Certificate setting forth the terms of the Notes 8-K 1/26/10 4.1 000-15175 4.4 Form of Global Note for Adobe Systems Incorporated’s 3.250% Notes due 2025, together with Form of Officer’s Certificate setting forth the terms of the Notes 8-K 1/26/2015 4.1 000-15175 10.1A Amended 1994 Performance and Restricted Stock Plan* 10-Q 4/9/10 10.1 000-15175 10.1B Form of Restricted Stock Agreement used in connection with the Amended 1994 Performance and Restricted Stock Plan* 10-K 1/23/09 10.3 000-15175 10.1C Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement used in connection with the Amended 1994 Performance and Restricted Stock Plan* 10-K 1/26/12 10.13 000-15175 10-Q 4/12/06 10.6 000-15175 S-8 6/16/00 4.8 333-39524 10-Q 6/24/15 10.3 000-15175 10.4A 2003 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended* 8-K 4/10/15 10.1 000-15175 10.4B Form of Stock Option Agreement used in connection with the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 12/20/10 99.4 000-15175 10.4C Form of RSU Grant Notice and Award Agreement pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/28/15 10.6 000-15175 10.2A 1996 Outside Directors Stock Option Plan, as amended* 10.2B 10.3 Forms of Stock Option Agreements used in connection with the 1996 Outside Directors Stock Option Plan* 1997 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as amended* 110 Filed Herewith Table of Contents Incorporated by Reference** Exhibit Number Exhibit Description Form Filing Date Exhibit Number SEC File No. 10.4D Form of Restricted Stock Agreement used in connection with the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 10-Q 10/7/04 10.11 000-15175 10.4E Form of Performance Share Program pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan (applicable to the 2012 Performance Share Program)* 8-K 1/26/12 10.2 000-15175 10.4F Award Calculation Methodology to the 2012 Performance Share Program pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/26/12 10.3 000-15175 10.4G Form of Performance Share Award Grant Notice and Performance Share Award Agreement pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan (applicable to the 2012 Performance Share Program)* 10-K 1/26/12 10.61 000-15175 10.4H 2013 Performance Share Program pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/28/13 10.2 000-15175 10.4I Form of Performance Share Award Grant Notice and Performance Share Award Agreement pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan (applicable to the 2013 Performance Share Program)* 8-K 1/28/13 10.3 000-15175 10.4J 2014 Performance Share Program pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/29/14 10.2 000-15175 Form of Performance Share Award Grant Notice and Performance Share Award Agreement pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan (applicable to the 2014 Performance Share Program)* 8-K 1/29/14 10.3 000-15175 8-K 1/28/15 10.2 000-15175 10.4K 10.4L 2015 Performance Share Program pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 10.4M Form of Performance Share Award Grant Notice and Performance Share Award Agreement pursuant to the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan (applicable to the 2015 Performance Share Program)* 8-K 1/28/15 10.3 000-15175 10.4N Form of Director Initial Grant Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement used in connection with the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 12/20/10 99.6 000-15175 10.4O Form of Director Annual Grant Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement used in connection with the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 12/20/10 99.7 000-15175 111 Filed Herewith Table of Contents Incorporated by Reference** Exhibit Number Exhibit Description Form Filing Date Exhibit Number SEC File No. 10.4P Form of Director Annual Grant Stock Option Agreement used in connection with the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan* 8-K 12/20/10 99.8 000-15175 10.5A 2005 Equity Incentive Assumption Plan, as amended and restated* 10-Q 6/28/13 10.17 000-15175 10.5B Form of Stock Option Agreement used in connection with the 2005 Equity Incentive Assumption Plan* 8-K 12/20/10 99.10 000-15175 10.5C Form of RSU Grant Notice and Award Agreement pursuant to the 2005 Equity Incentive Assumption Plan* 8-K 1/28/13 10.7 000-15175 10.6 Retention Agreement between Adobe Systems Incorporated and Shantanu Narayen, effective December 5, 2014* 8-K 12/11/14 10.20 000-15175 10.7 Form of Indemnity Agreement* 10-Q 6/26/09 10.12 000-15175 10.8A Lease between Adobe Systems Incorporated and Selco Service Corporation, dated March 26, 2007 8-K 3/28/07 10.1 000-15175 10.8B Participation Agreement among Adobe Systems Incorporated, Selco Service Corporation, et al. dated March 26, 2007 8-K 3/28/07 10.2 000-15175 10.8C Master Amendment No. 2 among Adobe Systems Incorporated, Selco Service Corporation and KeyBank National Association dated October 31, 2011 10-K 1/22/13 10.13 000-15175 Adobe Systems Incorporated Deferred Compensation Plan, as Amended and Restated* 10-K 1/20/15 10.19 000-15175 10.10A Credit Agreement, dated as of March 2, 2012, among Adobe Systems Incorporated and certain subsidiaries as Borrowers, The Royal Bank of Scotland PLC and U.S. Bank National Association as Co-Documentation Agents, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Syndication Agent, Bank of America, N.A. as Administrative Agent and Swing Line Lender, and the Other Lenders Party Thereto 8-K 3/7/12 10.1 000-15175 10.10B 8-K 7/30/15 10.1 000-15175 10.9 First Amendment to Credit Agreement, dated as of July 27, 2015 among the Company and Bank of America, N.A. as Administrative Agent and Swing Line Lender and the other lenders party thereto 112 Filed Herewith Table of Contents Incorporated by Reference** Exhibit Number Exhibit Description Form Filing Date Exhibit Number SEC File No. 10.11A Omniture, Inc. 1999 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended (the “Omniture 1999 Plan”)* S-1 4/4/06 10.2A 333-132987 10.11B Forms of Stock Option Agreement under the Omniture 1999 Plan* S-1 4/4/06 10.2B 333-132987 10.11C Form of Stock Option Agreement under the Omniture 1999 Plan used for Named Executive Officers and Non-Employee Directors* S-1 6/9/06 10.2C 333-132987 10.12 Omniture, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan and related forms* 10-Q 8/6/09 10.3 000-52076 10.13 Omniture, Inc. 2007 Equity Incentive Plan and related forms* 10-K 2/27/09 10.9 000-52076 10.14 Omniture, Inc. 2008 Equity Incentive Plan and related forms* 10-K 2/27/09 10.10 000-52076 10.15A Visual Sciences, Inc. (formerly, WebSideStory, Inc.) 2004 Equity Incentive Award Plan (the “VS 2004 Plan”) and Form of Option Grant Agreement* 10-K 2/29/08 10.6 000-52076 10.15B Form of Restricted Stock Award Grant Notice and Restricted Stock Award Agreement under the VS 2004 Plan* 10-K 2/29/08 10.6A 000-52076 10.16 Demdex, Inc. 2008 Stock Plan, as amended* S-8 1/27/11 99.1 333-171902 10.17 EchoSign, Inc. 2005 Stock Plan, as amended* S-8 7/29/11 99.1 333-175910 10.18 TypeKit, Inc. 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended* S-8 10/7/11 99.1 333-177229 10.19 Auditude, Inc. 2009 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended* S-8 11/18/11 99.1 333-178065 10.20 Auditude, Inc. Employee Stock Option Plan, as amended* S-8 11/18/11 99.2 333-178065 10.21 Description of 2012 Director Compensation* 10-K 1/26/12 10.76 000-15175 10.22 2012 Executive Annual Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/26/12 10.4 000-15175 10.23 Efficient Frontier, Inc. 2003 Stock Option/ Stock Issuance Plan, as Amended and Restated* S-8 1/27/12 99.1 333-179221 113 Filed Herewith Table of Contents Incorporated by Reference** Exhibit Number 10.24 Exhibit Description Filing Date Exhibit Number SEC File No. 8-K 12/5/12 99.1 000-15175 10.25A Behance, Inc. 2012 Equity Incentive Plan* S-8 1/23/13 99.1 333-186143 10.25B Amendment No. 1 to the Behance, Inc. 2012 Equity Incentive Plan* S-8 1/23/13 99.2 333-186143 10.26 2013 Executive Annual Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/28/13 10.5 000-15175 10.27 Neolane 2008 Stock Option Plan* S-8 8/27/13 99.1 333-190846 10.28 2012 Neolane Stock Option Plan for The United States* S-8 8/27/13 99.2 333-190846 10.29 Description of 2013 Director Compensation* 10-K 1/21/14 10.80 000-15175 10.30 Description of 2014 Director Compensation* 10-K 1/21/14 10.81 000-15175 10.31 Description of 2015 Director Compensation* 10-K 1/20/15 10.52 000-15175 10.32 Description of 2016 Director Compensation* 10.33 2014 Executive Annual Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/29/14 10.5 000-15175 10.34 2015 Executive Annual Incentive Plan* 8-K 1/28/15 10.5 000-15175 10.35A Aviary, Inc. 2008 Stock Plan, as amended S-8 9/26/14 99.1 333-198973 10.35B Form of Stock Option Grant Notice and Award Agreement pursuant to the Aviary, Inc. 2008 Stock Plan (Installment Vesting) S-8 9/26/14 99.2 333-198973 10.35C Form of Stock Option Grant Notice and Award Agreement pursuant to the Aviary, Inc. 2008 Stock Plan (Installment Vesting, NonU.S.) S-8 9/26/14 99.3 333-198973 10.36 Picasso Acquisition Holding 1, Inc. 2012 Stock Option and Grant Plan S-8 3/13/15 99.1 333-202732 10.37 Adobe Systems Incorporated 2014 Executive Severance Plan in the Event of a Change of Control* 8-K 12/11/14 10.1 000-15175 12.1 21 Nomination and Standstill Agreement between the Company and the ValueAct Group dated December 4, 2012 Form Filed Herewith X Ratio of Earnings to Fixed Charges X Subsidiaries of the Registrant X 114 Table of Contents Incorporated by Reference** Exhibit Number Exhibit Description Form Filing Date Exhibit Number SEC File No. Filed Herewith 23.1 Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm, KPMG LLP X 24.1 Power of Attorney (set forth on the signature page to this Annual Report on Form 10-K) X 31.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer, as required by Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 X 31.2 Certification of Chief Financial Officer, as required by Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 X 32.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer, as required by Rule 13a-14(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934† X 32.2 Certification of Chief Financial Officer, as required by Rule 13a-14(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934† X 101.INS XBRL Instance X 101.SCH XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema X 101.CAL XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation X 101.LAB XBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels X 101.PRE XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation X 101.DEF XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition X ___________________________ * ** † Compensatory plan or arrangement. References to Exhibits 10.11A through 10.15B are to filings made by Omniture, Inc. The certifications attached as Exhibits 32.1 and 32.2 that accompany this Annual Report on Form 10-K, are not deemed filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and are not to be incorporated by reference into any filing of Adobe Systems Incorporated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, whether made before or after the date of this Form 10-K, irrespective of any general incorporation language contained in such filing. 115

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