financial ratio

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 4th, 2016

Question description

I need someone who can help me complete the financial ratio part in this paper! Question 2, question 6 and 7!


Financial: www.finance.yahoo.com

Financial: www.forbes.com

Financial: www.hoovers.com

Financial: www.msnmoney.com

Financial: www.smartmoney.com

Business Strategy Case Analysis—Paper Template Instructions: 1. SPACING: The assignment should be double-spaced. The “Reference” section should be single-spaced with double spacing between entries. 2. FONT SIZE: Use Times Roman 12-point font. 3. FORMAT: Number all pages (bottom of page), and indent new paragraphs 5 spaces. Use the APA writing style to properly cite and reference all research material. 4. LENGTH: The body of the paper (Introduction to Conclusion) cannot exceed 30 pages. 5. RESEARCH: Effective research references many sources. (Use sources less than or equal to 10 years old.) Some basic references include the following: a. b. c. d. Your textbook Finance.yahoo.com and MSNmoney.com Hoovers.com Company Profile and Industry Profile: Business Source Premier (Enhanced) Datamonitor reports from Troy’s electronic databases (http://library.troy.edu/databases_business.html) e. The company’s website f. Small Business Administration (www.sba.gov) g. Wikipedia’s references or sources (NOT Wikipedia) 6. INSTRUCTION PAGE: You must delete the instruction page; that is, the title page is the first page of the report. “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 1 of 20 COMPANY NAME (Case Analysis) Group #--Section # Specialist A Specialist B Specialist C Specialist D Specialist E Specialist F Presentation Date “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 2 of 20 SPECIALIST ASSIGNMENT Introduction…………………………………………………………...…………..Specialist #1 Question 1……………………………………………………...………………….Specialist #1 Question 2 (Financial Matrices)……………………………………….………….Specialist #2 Question 3…………………………………………………………...…………….Specialist #3 Question 4…………………………………………………………...…………….Specialist #4 Question 5 (SWOT & GS Matrices)……………………………………..……….Specialist #5 Question 6a&b………………………………………….…………...…………….Specialist #5 Question 6c (Pro forma Statements).…………………………..…...…………….Specialist #6 Question 7…………………………………………………………...…………….Specialist #6 Update & Conclusion…………………………………………….……………….Specialist #6 INTRODUCTION State your intentions/plans for the paper. Give an overview of the paper, and indicate the year of your case. You should provide a brief company history as well as an industry summary. The industry analysis should include a discussion of the industry’s total revenue, compound annual growth rate, major product categories, and competitors. (The CAGR is needed to position the company in the Grand Strategy Matrix.) “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 3 of 20 CASE ANALYSIS Question 1: Identify the firm’s apparent current mission. Then briefly review the firm’s current objectives and strategies. [Please note that you must evaluate the firm’s mission statement.] Mission Statement: Mission Statement Evaluation: Component 1 2 3 4 5 6 Company Company Objectives: Company Strategies: “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 4 of 20 7 8 9 Question 2: How would you describe the firm’s current financial condition? [Use financial ratios and other pertinent income and balance sheet data to support your analysis.] Historical Financial Analysis: [You must explain the trends in each of the five categories—liquidity ratios, asset utilization ratios, leverage ratios, profitability ratios, and market ratios. Use the end points for your assessment of the period.] Competitor Financial Analysis: [You must explain your company’s positioning in each of the five categories—liquidity ratios, asset utilization ratios, leverage ratios, profitability ratios, and market ratios.] Overall Financial Health or Evaluation: “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 5 of 20 Question 3: Outline and discuss the firm’s external opportunities and threats, using any analytical model(s) you believe are relevant. [You must analyze the General Environment, Industry Environment, and the firm’s strategic group to determine this information.] “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 6 of 20 Question 4: Outline and discuss the firm’s internal strengths and weaknesses using any analytical model(s) you believe are relevant. [Strengths and weaknesses will include information from the financial analysis.] “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 7 of 20 Question 5: Based on your analysis: a. Revise the firm’s mission and objectives if necessary. b. Develop and discuss corporate and business strategies that you recommend to achieve the firm’s mission and objectives. Mission and Objective Revisions: Alternative Solutions or Strategies: [Your SWOT Matrix should contain your final selection of strategies; that is, you must integrate the “desired” strategies from the Grand Strategy Matrix. You will discuss in detail the top three strategies in this section.] Strategy 1: [Identify the strategy and discuss how it will solve the company’s problems or help it reach its goals.] Strategy 2: [Identify the strategy and discuss how it will solve the company’s problems or help it reach its goals.] Strategy3: [Identify the strategy and discuss how it will solve the company’s problems or help it reach its goals.] “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 8 of 20 Question 6: Outline and discuss the specific actions needed for implementation of your chosen strategy. This should include the following: a. Specific strategies and long-term objectives in such areas as marketing, human resources, finance, operations, and information systems as appropriate. b. Specify specific annual objectives and the policies for achieving these objectives, in areas such as marketing, human resources, finance, operations, and information systems as appropriate. c. Specify the results you can expect, including pro forma financial statements. Recommended Strategy: [You must choose “one” strategy to implement.] Implementation of Selected Strategy: a. Management: b. Marketing: c. Operations: d. Accounting/Finance: e. Research & Development: Proforma Financial Statements: “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 9 of 20 Question 7: Recommend procedures for strategy review and evaluation. Include specific measures that you will utilize. Projected Financial Ratios: [Discuss the impact of the selected strategy.] Balanced Scorecard: [You must list the important annual objectives necessary to achieve the firm’s long-term goals.] Rumelt’s Criteria: [Evaluate the selected strategy relative to Rumelt’s Criteria.] “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 10 of 20 UPDATE What has happened since the case was written? (Note: If this is a real-time case, this section is omitted.) CONCLUSION Provide a summary. Overall, what do you think about the company? “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 11 of 20 REFERENCES David, F.R. (2005). Strategic management: Concepts and cases (10e). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson-Prentice Hall. MBA Comprehensive Questions. (2002). Sorrell College of Business, Troy University. (Add additional research sources to this list, and list the sources in alphabetical and chronological order using the APA format!) “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 12 of 20 APPENDIX A: FINANCIAL RATIOS “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 13 of 20 Financial Ratios: Historical Comparison Case Year-2 Case Year-1 Case Year Assessment Liquidity Ratios Current Ratio Quick Ratio Asset Utilization Ratios Inventory Turnover DSI AR Turnover DSO (ACP) Fixed Asset Turnover Total Asset Turnover Debt Management Ratios Debt Ratio TIE Profitability Ratios Gross Margin Operating Margin Profit Margin BEP ROA ROE Market Ratios P/E P/CF M/B Assessment Notation: P=Positive Trend, N=Negative Trend, Dash=No Change. “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 14 of 20 Financial Ratios: Competitor Comparison Company Competitor Case Year Competitor Industry Liquidity Ratios Current Ratio Quick Ratio Asset Utilization Ratios Inventory Turnover DSI AR Turnover DSO (ACP) Fixed Asset Turnover Total Asset Turnover Debt Management Ratios Debt Ratio TIE Profitability Ratios Gross Margin Operating Margin Profit Margin BEP ROA ROE Market Ratios P/E P/CF M/B Assessment Notation: S=Strength, W=Weakness, Dash=Neutral. “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 15 of 20 Assessment APPENDIX B: STRATEGIC MATRICES “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 16 of 20 SWOT MATRIX Strengths SWOT MATRIX Your Company Weaknesses 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 Opportunities 1 2 3 4 5 Threats 1 2 3 4 5 “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 17 of 20 GRAND STRATEGY MATRIX (David, 2005) RAPID MARKET GROWTH Quadrant II Quadrant I Your Company (Example) WEAK COMPETITIVE POSITION STRONG COMPETITIVE POSITION Quadrant III Quadrant IV SLOW MARKET GROWTH “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 18 of 20 APPENDIX C: PRO-FORMA STATEMENTS “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 19 of 20 APPENDIX D: EXTRA CREDIT MATRICES EFE Matrix CP Matrix IFE Matrix QSPM Matrix “Company Name” Case Analysis Page 20 of 20
Financial Statements—Analysis1 Chapter 4 Financial statements report both a firm’s position at a point in time and its operations over a specified period. The REAL VALUE of financial statements, however is that they can be used to help predict future earnings as well as dividends! There are 5 primary categories of financial ratios—Liquidity, Asset Management (Utilization), Debt Management (Leverage), Profitability, and Market Value. As a general rule, financial analysts and management are concerned if a firm’s ratios are far removed from the averages for its industry; it is a signal to look further, to find out why the variance occurs. Never forget that you must look at a number of ratios to see what each suggests, then look at the overall situation to judge the company’s performance with the goal of trying to figure out what the company should do to improve! PLEASE NOTE: A meaningful ratio analysis must go beyond calculation to interpretation. A firm’s financial position cannot be analyzed in isolation; reference points are needed, such as historical comparisons, comparison with industry norms, and comparison with key competitors! I. Liquidity Ratios: A. The Current Ratio: 1. Formula: Current Ratio = Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2. Focus: Will the firm be able to pay off its debts as they come due in the coming year? 3. Indication of Possible Trouble: Current Liabilities are rising faster than Current Assets! 4. Healthy Ratio (Rule of Thumb): Current Ratio = 2 5. Abbreviations: Current Assets = CA Current Liabilities = CL 1 Except where noted, the material references: Brigham, E.F., & Houston, J.F. (2007). Fundamentals of financial management (11e), Australia: Thomson-SouthWestern. B. The Quick Ratio: 1. Formula: Quick Ratio = (CA – Inventories)/CL 2. Focus: Firm’s ability to pay its bills without depending on inventory because inventories are typically the least liquid of firm’s current assets, which means they are the assets on which losses are most likely to occur in the event of liquidation. II. Asset Management Ratios: These ratios measure how effectively the firm is managing its assets. Asset management ratios answer the question: Does the amount of each type of asset seem reasonable, too high, or too low given current and projected sales? A. The Inventory Turnover Ratio: 1. Formula: Inventory Turnover Ratio = Sales/Inventories 2. Focus: How many times the asset is turned over during year. 3. Indication of Possible Trouble: Extremely low inventory turnovers relative to the industry suggest the firm is holding too much inventory; firms may be holding obsolete goods not worth their stated value! 4. Days Sales in Inventory (DSI): is used to appraise inventories, to find how many days’ sales are tied up in inventories. Thus, it represents the average length of time that inventory sits before it is sold! Alternatively, it is the time it will take to work off the current inventory a. DSI = (365 days)/(Inventory Turnover) = Inventory/average daily sales = Inventory/(Sales/365) 5. Note: The inventory measures give us some indication of how fast the firm can sell its products! 1 Except where noted, the material references: Brigham, E.F., & Houston, J.F. (2007). Fundamentals of financial management (11e), Australia: Thomson-SouthWestern. B. The Accounts Receivable Turnover Ratio: 1. Formula: Accounts Receivable Turnover Ratio = Sales /AR 2. Focus: How many times the asset is turned over during year. 3. Indication of Possible Trouble: low turnovers relative to the industry. 4. Days Sales Outstanding (DSO) or Average Collection Period (ACP): is used to appraise accounts receivable, to find how many days’ sales are tied up in receivables. Thus, it represents the average length of time that the company must wait after making a credit sale to receive cash! a. DSO = (365 days)/(AR turnover) = AR/average daily sales = AR/(Sales/365) b. DSO can also be evaluated by comparing it to the company’s credit terms 5. Note: Sales here refer to “Credit Sales.” 6. Note: The AR measures tell us how fast the firm can collect on its sales (credit sales)! C. The Fixed Assets Turnover Ratio: 1. Formula: Fixed Assets Turnover = Sales/(Net fixed assets) 2. Focus: How effectively the firm uses its plant and equipment. (Does the firm use its fixed assets as intensively as other firms in its industry? If yes, then it has about the right amount of fixed assets relative to its sales.) 3. Note: Large variances between market value and book value (inflation) tend to inflate the Fixed Assets Turnover, which could cause an older company to appear more efficient than a younger company, but these ratio differences would be more reflective of when the assets were acquired rather than the inefficiency of the younger firm! 1 Except where noted, the material references: Brigham, E.F., & Houston, J.F. (2007). Fundamentals of financial management (11e), Australia: Thomson-SouthWestern. D. The Total Assets Turnover Ratio: 1. Formula: Total Assets Turnover = Sales/(Total Assets) 2. Focus: How effectively the firm uses all its assets. 3. Note: It measures the turnover of all the firm’s assets, the company’s ability to generate sales based on its assets. III. Debt Management Ratios: used to determine the extent to which a firm uses debt financing or financial leverage. A. Implications (motivations behind financial leveraging): 1. Stockholders prefer higher debt ratios because it allows them to control a firm with a limited amount of equity investment. 2. Creditors prefer lower debt ratios (higher proportion of total capital supplied by stockholders) because it reduces their risk! Creditors look to equity to provide a margin of safety. 3. The advantage of Financial Leverage: If the firm earns more on its assets than the interest rate it pays on debt, then using debt “leverages,” or magnifies, the return on equity (ROE)! There are 2 reasons for the leveraging effect: 1. The Tax Shield increases pre-tax income. 2. When EBIT as a percentage of assets exceeds the interest rate on debt, as it generally is expected to do, then a firm can use the debt to acquire assets, pay the interest on the debt, and have money left over as a “bonus” for its stockholders! 4. The double-edge sword of leveraging: Firms with high debt ratios have higher expected returns when the economy is good (or normal) but enhanced or greater losses when the economy is bad (i.e., recession)! 1 Except where noted, the material references: Brigham, E.F., & Houston, J.F. (2007). Fundamentals of financial management (11e), Australia: Thomson-SouthWestern. B. The Debt Ratio: 1. Formula: Debt Ratio = Total debt/Total assets 2. Focus: It measures the percentage of funds provided by creditors! 3. Red Flag: High debt ratios make it relatively costly to borrow additional funds, if creditors are willing to make loans! C. The Times-Interest-Earned Ratio: 1. Formula: TIE = EBIT/(interest charges) 2. Focus: TIE measures the extent to which operating income can decline before the firm is unable to meet its annual interest costs. D. The EBITDA Coverage Ratio: 1. EBITDA = (EBITDA + lease pmts)/(Int + Prin + lease pmts) 2. All cash flow available for pmts & all required financial pmts 3. Note: If EBIT declines, the coverage will fall! IV. Profitability Ratios: The liquidity, asset management, and debt ratios covered thus far tell us something about the firm’s policies and operations, but profitability ratios reflect the net result of all the financing policies and operating decisions! A. Profit Margin on Sales Ratio: 1. Formula: Profit Margin on sales = Net Income/Sales 2. Focus: Measures the profit per dollar of sales 3. Note: Sub-par results generally occur because costs are too high or inefficient operations! It can also be a result of the financing strategy. 4. Note: While high return on sales is good, we must also be concerned with turnover! (If a firm sets a very high price on its products, it may get a high return on each sale but not make many sales.) B. Return on Total Assets: 1. Formula: ROA = Net Income/ (Total Assets) 2. Note: Sub-par results may reflect financing strategy. 1 Except where noted, the material references: Brigham, E.F., & Houston, J.F. (2007). Fundamentals of financial management (11e), Australia: Thomson-SouthWestern. C. Basic Earning Power Ratio: 1. Formula: BEP = EBIT/(Total Assets) 2. Focus: BEP shows the raw earning power of the firm’s assets, before the influence of taxes and leverage, and it is useful when comparing firms with different degrees of financial leverage and tax situations! D. Return on Common Equity: 1. Formula: ROE = Net Income/(Common Equity) 2. Focus: Stockholders expect to earn a return on their money, and this ratio tells how well they are doing in an accounting sense! It is considered the “bottom-line” accounting ratio! V. Market Value Ratios: relate the firm’s stock price to its earnings, cash flow, and book value per share. These ratios give management an indication of what investor think about the firm’s risk and future prospects! A. The Price/Earnings Ratio: 1. Formula: P/E = (Price per share)/(Earnings per share) 2. Focus: It shows how much investors are willing to pay per dollar of reported profits. 3. Note: P/E ratios are higher for firms with strong growth prospects and relatively little risk! B. The Price/Cash Flow Ratio: 1. Formula: Price/cash flow = (Price per share)/(CF per share) 2. Focus: It shows the dollar amount investors will pay for $1 of cash flow. 3. Note: P/CF ratios tend to be higher for firms with strong growth prospects and relatively little risk! C. The Market/Book Ratio: 1. Book Value/share = Common equity /(# shares outstanding) 2. Market/Book Ratio = (Market price per share)/(BV/share) 3. Focus: shows the dollar amount investors will pay for $1 of book value. 4. Note: Companies that are well regarded by investors sell at higher multiples of book value. 1 Except where noted, the material references: Brigham, E.F., & Houston, J.F. (2007). Fundamentals of financial management (11e), Australia: Thomson-SouthWestern.

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