Research Interview Questions: Female Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 12th, 2016

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My name is Cindy Hardy and I am a graduate learner and I am recruiting individuals to explore female perceptions of their personal lived experiences of being a survivor of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) from a family member and how implementing forgiveness as a coping skill affected their relationship toward their perpetrator. The interviews questions need to be answered in detail and the total length of the interview transcript must be 6 pages in length and single spaced. Please also complete the Heartland Forgiveness Questionnaire. I need 4 women to complete this, so I will be posting this 4 times in order to get back 4 different transcripts.

My name is Cindy Hardy and I am a graduate learner and I am recruiting individuals to explore female perceptions of their personal lived experiences of being a survivor of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) from a family member and how implementing forgiveness as a coping skill affected their relationship toward their perpetrator. The interviews questions need to be answered in detail and the total length of the interview transcript must be 6 pages in length and single spaced. Eligibility to participate in the research includes the following:  (a) The participant must be a female.  (b) The participant must be age 18 and over to participate in the study.  (c) The participant must be a survivor of childhood sexual abuse  (d) The perpetrator of the childhood sexual abuse must have been a biological family member and blood relative, which will include immediate and extended family members; including uncles, aunts, cousins, and grandparents.  (e) The participant implemented forgiveness as a coping skill that impacted their relationship toward their perpetrator. Interview Questions IQ.I: What do you remember the most about your childhood? IQ.2: How was your relationship with your mother? IQ.3: How was your relationship with your father? IQ.4: Was there anyone in your family that was supportive for you during your childhood that you trusted? IQ.5: Please share your experience as a survivor of CSA? IQ6: How do you feel about the family member who sexually abused you? IQ.7: How has the abuse impacted your life? IQ.8: Are there challenges that you experienced in your adulthood relationships as a result of the CSA? IQ.9: When did you consider yourself to be healed from the abuse? IQ.10: What has been your decision in regards to implementing forgiveness towards your perpetrator? IQ.11: What components of forgiveness are important to you? IQ.12: What has helped you in your effort to forgive and forget the incident? IQ.13: What is your relationship like with your perpetrator since surviving the abuse? IQ.14: What you share what forgiveness means to you IQ.15: Please can you share any other information regarding the incident, forgiving the person who abused you as well as your life after all that happened?
Heartland Forgiveness Scale (Questionnaire) Directions: In the course of our lives negative things may occur because of our own actions, the actions of others, or circumstances beyond our control. For some time after these events, we may have negative thoughts or feelings about ourselves, others, or the situation. Think about how you typically respond to such negative events. Next to each of the following items write the number (from the 7-point scale below) that best describes how you typically respond to the type of negative situation described. There are no right or wrong answers. Please be as open as possible in your answers. 1 Almost Always False of Me 2 3 More Often False of Me 4 5 More Often True of Me 6 7 Almost Always True of Me ____ 1. Although I feel badly at first when I mess up, over time I can give myself some slack. ____ 2. I hold grudges against myself for negative things I’ve done. ____ 3. Learning from bad things that I’ve done helps me get over them. ____ 4. It is really hard for me to accept myself once I’ve messed up. ____ 5. With time I am understanding of myself for mistakes I’ve made. ____ 6. I don’t stop criticizing myself for negative things I’ve felt, thought, said, or done. ____ 7. I continue to punish a person who has done something that I think is wrong. ____ 8. With time I am understanding of others for the mistakes they’ve made. ____ 9. I continue to be hard on others who have hurt me. ____ 10. Although others have hurt me in the past, I have eventually been able to see them as good people. ____ 11. If others mistreat me, I continue to think badly of them. ____ 12. When someone disappoints me, I can eventually move past it. ____ 13. When things go wrong for reasons that can’t be controlled, I get stuck in negative thoughts about it. ____ 14. With time I can be understanding of bad circumstances in my life. ____ 15. If I am disappointed by uncontrollable circumstances in my life, I continue to think negatively about them. ____ 16. I eventually make peace with bad situations in my life. ____ 17. It’s really hard for me to accept negative situations that aren’t anybody’s fault. ____ 18. Eventually I let go of negative thoughts about bad circumstances that are beyond anyone’s control. Copyright Laura Y. Thompson and C. R. Synder © August 1, 1999 HFS Scoring Instructions Four scores are calculated for the Heartland Forgiveness Scale (HFS): Total HFS (items 1-18) HFS Forgiveness of Self subscale (items 1-6) HFS Forgiveness of Others subscale (items 7-12) HFS Forgiveness of Situations subscale (items 13-18) To score the HFS: 1. Scores for items 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, & 18 are the same as the answer written by the person taking the HFS. Scores for items 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, and 17 are reversed. For example, an answer of 1 is given a score of 7 and an answer of 7 is given a score of 1. Refer to the tables below for more information about scoring individual items. 2. To calculate the Total HFS, HFS Forgivenesss of Self, HFS Forgiveness of Others, and HFS Forgiveness of Situations, sum the values for the items that compose each scale or subscale (with appropriate items being reverse scored). Scores for the Total HFS can range from 18 to 126. Scores for each of the three HFS subscales can range from 6 to 42. Scoring Items 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, & 18 Reverse-Scoring Items 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, & 17 Person’s Answer Item Score Person’s Answer Item Score 1 1 1 7 2 2 2 6 3 3 3 5 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 3 6 6 6 2 7 7 7 1 Interpreting HFS Scores The Heartland Forgiveness Scale (HFS) is an 18-item, self-report questionnaire designed to assess a person’s dispositional forgiveness (i.e., one’s general tendency to be forgiving), rather than forgiveness of a particular event or person. The HFS consists of items that reflect a person’s tendency to forgive him or herself, other people, and situations that are beyond anyone’s control (e.g., a natural disaster). Four scores are calculated for the HFS. There is a score for the Total HFS and a score for each of the three HFS subscales (HFS Forgiveness of Self subscale, HFS Forgiveness of Others subscale, and HFS Forgiveness of Situations). Scores for the Total HFS can range from 18 to 126. Scores for the three HFS subscales can range from 6 to 42. Total HFS One’s score on the Total HFS indicates how forgiving a person tends to be of oneself, other people, and uncontrollable situations. Higher scores indicate higher levels of forgiveness, and lower scores indicate lower levels of forgiveness.    A score of 18 to 54 on the Total HFS indicates that one is usually unforgiving of oneself, others, and uncontrollable situations. A score of 55 to 89 on the Total HFS indicates that one is about as likely to forgive, as one is not to forgive oneself, others, and uncontrollable situations. A score of 90 to 126 on the Total HFS indicates that one is usually forgiving of oneself, others, and uncontrollable situations. HFS Subscales One’s score on the three HFS subscales indicate how forgiving a person tends to be of oneself (HFS Forgiveness of Self), other people (HFS Forgiveness of Others), or situations beyond anyone’s control (HFS Forgiveness of Situations). Higher scores indicate higher levels of forgiveness, and lower scores indicating lower levels of forgiveness.    A score of 6 to 18 on HFS Forgiveness of Self, HFS Forgiveness of Others, or HFS Forgiveness of Situations indicates that one is usually unforgiving of oneself, other people, or uncontrollable situations, respectively. A score of 19 to 29 indicates that one is about as likely to forgive as to not forgive oneself, other people, or uncontrollable situations, respectively. A score of 30 to 42 indicates that one is usually forgiving of oneself, other people, or uncontrollable situations, respectively.

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