The Jury Responses

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 13th, 2016

Question description

Can you Response to these Questions:

Good post!! Let's discuss more about the similarities and differences between group think and group polarization. Can you provide a concrete example of each and how these ideas are similar and different?

Guided Response: Review several of your colleagues’ posts and respond to at least two of your peers. In your responses, ask your fellow classmates some follow-up questions or provide suggestions. You may want to ask them to clarify some things, identify some potential issues they may want to consider, and provide them with some suggestions regarding their recommendations.


First One:

What is the most important thing you think the attorney needs to know about group dynamics?

I would think an important thing for the attorney to keep in mind is how each jury member is responsible for their own thoughts/feelings on the matter. However, many times if a jury member can relate to the situation at hand they are more likely to feel more leniency towards the subject than say someone who has not been in that particular situation. With that being said, sometimes jurors are embarrassed to speak their mind and simply agree with the majority of the others.

Define and discuss group polarization, groupthink, and social influence?

Group polarization is defined as the average post group response will tend to be more extreme in the same direction as the average of the pregroup responses (Myers & Lamm, 1976). In other words, a group is more likely to make harsher conclusions than that of what an individual would make.

Groupthink may be defined as “a mode of thinking that people engage in when they are deeply involved in a cohesive in-group, when the members’ strivings for unanimity override their motivation to realistically appraise alternative courses of action” (Breger, 2010). For example, say you are working in a group for a class assignment. A group member proposes an idea that you don’t particularly agree with but everyone else in the group thinks it’s great so you just agree.

Social influence takes place when a persons’ emotions, opinions, or behaviors are affected by that of another person. Peer pressure is a perfect example of social influence. Say you’re at a party where there is a bunch of drinking going on and you’re not a drinker, however you decide to drink to “fit in”.

How might these processes affect jury deliberations (e.g., jury decision making)?

Group polarization, groupthink, and social influence can all play a crucial part in jury decision making. Any time you are in a group and are required to make a decision it’s natural to feel pressured to make the right decision. Say you think the person is not guilty but the majority of your group thinks he is guilty and you just keep quiet to “keep the peace”, this is a decision that could affect someone’s life forever.

Think back to your readings on processing persuasive messages. What would you suggest to the attorney in terms of persuading the jury that his client is a trustworthy and honest person?

One way the attorney could win over the jury would be to possibly find a way to pull at their heart strings. Talk about his children and the fact that he has a bond with them like no other. Maybe mention any community ties or church affiliation he may have or the fact that he is a well-respected man. The lawyer should provide instances in which the politician has shown trustworthiness.

Breger, M. L. (2010). MAKING WAVES OR KEEPING THE CALM?: ANALYZING THE INSTITUTIONAL CULTURE OF FAMILY COURTS THROUGH THE LENS OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY GROUPTHINK THEORY. Law & Psychology Review, 3455-90.

Myers, D. G., & Lamm, H. (1976). The group polarization phenomenon. Psychological Bulletin, 83(4), 602-627.

Please Responses..............

2nd One:

The Jury

What is the most important thing you think the attorney needs to know about group dynamics?

I believe the most important thing that the attorney needs to know is that when it comes to a jury, the decision will be determined as a group. When a group is to decide, or must conclude about something or someone, there will be bias involved because not every human being thinks alike. There will be some individuals who whom will have bias thoughts. For me when it comes to politicians, I feel as though many will do whatever necessary to get where they need to be. However, I do feel as though there are truthful politicians.

Define and discuss group polarization, groupthink, and social influence?

Group polarization gives individuals a chance to come together and decide on something based on facts and not their personal beliefs or actions. Group think occurs when someone tends to only care about their values, beliefs, or feel the need to be coherence instead of focusing on the accuracy of something or the facts. Social Influence can occur if an individual believes that another individual is more intelligent, or knows more about a certain subject than others. When this occurs the individual, who seems more intelligent may influence the other individual intentionally or unintentionally (Dovidio, J. F., & Gaertner, S. L. (2010).

How might these processes affect jury deliberations (e.g., jury decision making)?

These processes can affect jury deliberations by delaying the verdict, it can cause stress within the group, it could cause an undecided decision within the group and so on.

What would you suggest to the attorney in terms of persuading the jury that his client is a trustworthy and honest person?

I would suggest convincing the jury that his clients’ actions were based on his concerns he has for the city in which he wants to become Mayor. If he can convince or persuade the jury to believe that his client is truthful but acted on his emotions, the jury may be convinced.

References:

Dovidio, J. F., & Gaertner, S. L. (2010). Intergroup bias. In S. T. Fiske, D.T. Gilbert, & G. Lindzey (Eds.), Handbook of social psychology (5th ed.). (Vol. 2, pp. 1084-1121). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons, Inc. Retrieved from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.proxy-library.ashford.edu/

Aloka, P. O., & Bojuwoye, O. (2013). Group Polarization Effects on Decisions by Selected Kenyan Secondary School Disciplinary Panels. Journal Of Psychology In Africa, 23(2), 275-282. Retrieved from: http://web.b.ebscohost.com.proxy-library.ashford.edu/

Gagnon, K. T., Geuss, M. N., Stefanucci, J. K., Baucom, B. R., & Creem-Regehr, S. H. (2015). The Influence of Social Context and Body Size on Action Judgments for Self and Others. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception & Performance, 41(5), 1385-1395. doi:10.1037/xhp0000089. Retrieved from: http://web.b.ebscohost.com.proxy-library.ashford.edu/


Please Responses..............

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