Research Log

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 15th, 2016

Question description

I need a research log for the following article and the video.

Article: http://go.galegroup.com.proxy.wexler.hunter.cuny.e...

Video:

I am uploading an example but it's about a different research topic. The example I am uploading shows what I am really asking.

Here is my topic and guiding questions (these are needed to complete the assignment) :

(My Research Topic: Peer education in Prison

Guiding Question: What is the effectiveness of peer-based interventions to maintain and improve health in prisons?

Smaller Questions: What are the effects of peer-based interventions on prisoner health? What are the positive and negative impacts of delivering peer-based interventions on health services within prison settings?How do the effects of peer-based approaches compare to those of professionally-led approaches?)

English 120 - Ms. Murray Research Log Guidelines You’ll note that for the Research Log, you are required to cite more sources than you actually use (you may end up using all of them, or you may not). Here are the due dates as indicated on the research paper handout: Research Log 1 – Due Tue, Nov 1 At this point, you should have a complex and well thought-out guiding question. From this larger question, you will also certainly have smaller questions. Again, you can use the stasis questions to help you further narrow down your exploration of your topic. Your main research question and 23 smaller questions should be stated at the beginning of your Research Log. Additionally, you must cite 4 sources that you looked into about your topic. Out of those 4 sources, you will then choose 2 that you think will be most useful for responding to your research questions and annotate them. Research Log 2 – Due Tue, Nov 8 Your research question may have slightly changed based on the research you have conducted at this point. You should still have smaller questions as well. Again, you can use the stasis questions to help you further think through your topic. Your main research question and 2-3 new smaller questions that come from it should be stated at the beginning of your Research Log. Also, you will cite 4 additional sources that you looked into about your topic. Out of those 4 sources, you will choose 2 that you think will be most useful for responding to your research questions and annotate them. Research Log 3 – Due Tue, Nov 15 Your research question again may have slightly changed based on the research you have conducted at this point. You should still have smaller questions as well. Again, you can use the stasis questions to help you further think through your topic. Your main research question and 3 new smaller questions that come from it should be stated at the beginning your Research Log. Also, you will cite 3 additional sources that you looked into about your topic. Out of those 3 sources, you will choose 2 that you think will be most useful for responding to your research questions and annotate them. By the end of this research log, you should start formulating your working thesis argument. Note: I require that one of your sources be a scholarly or peer-reviewed article (you can find these by clicking the appropriate box on the left side of Academic Search Complete or finding an option in whatever database you choose to use). However, you should also consider using various kinds of sources. HOW TO PREPARE ANNOTATIONS Annotations vs. Abstracts: Abstracts are the purely descriptive summaries often found at the beginning of scholarly journal articles or in periodical indexes. Annotations are descriptive and critical; they ask you to explain why you chose your source and what authority the writer has on your topic. An annotation contains both descriptive and evaluative information. The purpose of the annotation is to help you plan your paper and to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources you plan to use. The Process: Creating a Research Log calls for the application of a variety of intellectual skills: concise exposition, succinct analysis, and informed research. 1. Once your topic is narrowed and you have created your research questions (large and small), you will locate and record citations for books and articles, credible websites, experts to interview, videos, etc. that may contain useful information and ideas on your topic. 2. Briefly preview, skim, and review the sources. Then choose works that: - are up-to-date on your issue (look at the publication date), - provide the most useful information for your discussion of your topic, - help you to support your exploration of the issue, - and provide a variety of approaches to adding to your argument – background/historical details, examples, statistics, stories, expert testimonial, research/studies, arguments, methods, etc. 3. Be sure to cite each source using the appropriate MLA format. 4. Write a concise annotation for the 2 sources you choose as the most helpful in each Research Log. In the annotation: (1) Summarize the central ideas and scope of the source, (2) Respond to the information presented with your own thoughts. (3) Elaborate on how you intend to use the source and how it illuminates your issue, (4) Explain the authority or background of the author, and (5) Compare the work with others you have also cited. How will the sources work together to support your research? Instructions: Complete Citation: (See your MLA handout and the Writing With Sources section of your book to review the templates for citations) Summary of source: (about 4-5 sentences) Response to ideas/information presented in the source with your thoughts: Do you agree/disagree/both with an argument? Does a piece of evidence shock you or confirm an idea you had? Did you learn something new? (about 2-3 sentences) What is the author’s authority on the topic? (about 1 sentence) Reason for choosing this source: How do you imagine you will incorporate it? (about 2 sentences) How does it relate to your other sources? (about 2 sentences) SAMPLE ANNOTATION FOR A JOURNAL ARTICLE Citation should look like this: Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume. Issue (Year): Pages. Medium of publication. (NOTE: Standard MLA practice requires double spacing within citations.) Example: Working Research Question: Does getting married later in life lead to a more fulfilling and more equal marriage? Smaller Questions: Does it allow people time and freedom to develop and understand their individual needs, desires, aspirations, and identities more fully before committing to a mate? Are there different effects of marriage based on gender? Are same-sex marriages impacted in similar ways as heterosexual marriages? Waite, Linda J., Frances Kobrin Goldscheider, and Christina Witsberger. "Nonfamily Living and the Erosion of Traditional Family Orientations Among Young Adults." American Sociological Review 5.1 (1986): 541-554. Print. The authors are researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University and have a strong history in researching marriage, gender, and identity issues. They use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. The authors also make the point that the structure of the family has changed in recent time because more young adults spend time away from home before getting married, and as a result tend to get married later, encourage women to work, and consider having less children. These study findings make sense to me and support the idea that I suspected may be true – that getting married later in life tends to give people more time to get to know themselves as individuals. As the article suggests, this may lead to stronger marriages than those that result from couples who get married too young before knowing themselves and what they truly want out of life. Although, I am sure there are exceptions – some marriages that work out well even though they happened at young ages – but based on these findings perhaps that is because the couples still give each other the room to grow and discover themselves as individuals. This article contrasts with an earlier study by Williams cited in my research, which shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living. This source will provide evidence to partially refute the earlier study because the findings here suggest that the time spent as independent adults prior to marriage has a significant impact on the development of identity and individualism, which I suspect contributes to an individual’s definition of gender roles. I will need to find sources to support this connection if I am to head toward the argument that women who marry later have more time to develop a mature and liberal sense of gender identity before intertwining their identity with a mate.

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