Need an evidence report (details listed)

Anonymous
timer Asked: Nov 18th, 2016

Question description

I have attached four files to look at. 

The evidence report form is the one that needs filling out.

Please ask any questions if anythings confusing or if you need more information.

Thank you.

This Report contains THREE PARTS – make sure to fill them out in the format below Part 1: Describing the evidence you will study. 1. What is your current research question? How do rules shape writing? 2. Why does this question matter to you? I have often lost points on class writing for reasons that seem arbitrary to me, so I’m glad to find published writers who also think writing rules are too limiting 3. Describe what you will study. Fill out the answers to the appropriate table column and delete the other. Description Notes (pick one column) collection of evidence What are they? : Experiences in high school writing classes Why are they important?: They provide anecdotal evidence to show how rules have influenced my writing How do they fit into your question? These experiences prove that rules really do change the way I write based on the class How will you select/sample from the collection fairly? I will use all personal examples, but some from different classes to get a range of experiences. If I only used experiences from one class, my ideas would be limited. Part 2: Analyzing your object/s of study. To closely analyze your object, make at least 10 concrete observations with 10 responses. Complete the chart below. After completing the chart, remember to also finish questions in Part 3 (new page). I recommend adding a page break after the table and deleting these instructions for best layout. Analysis Notes What I Observe/Remember (Concrete Observations) My Interpretations/Questions in Response th This was helpful, in some ways, because it kept us from losing points if we remembered to follow the rules. It was never explained why these 25 things were so terrible, though. In 2. My AP teacher, Mrs. Janoff, had a list of future classes, I’ve broken these rules and it “25 things not to do” hasn’t mattered. I wish Mrs. Janoff had explained her reasoning for giving us this list. Why not a list of 25 things to do? Would that have made me think differently about writing rules? I’ve come to appreciate this rule because “very” and “really” sound immature in upper3. OneofthethingsonMrs.Janoff’slist was not level papers. This was also helpful in to use “empty” adjectives like “very” or highschool because it forced me to think of “really” better adjectives to use and improve my vocabulary. This was a strange rule because she did teach us about semi-colons, but we still were told 4. Mrs. Janoff said that we should avoid seminot to use them. In retrospect, this is a little colons because students rarely used them insulting because it seems like she didn’t think correctly we could understand more difficult grammar concepts. Like the “very” rule, I think this ended up helping. It was hard for me to remember 5. The list also said not to start a sentence because I would naturally start sentences with with “It” “it,” but it made me find better subjects for my sentences and it got rid of a lot of my confusion Like the book report incident, this made me mad at the time. I also realize now that I would have had time to catch these problems 6. I remember losing points on my big end of if I didn’t wait till the last minute to write my year paper just for MLA formatting errors papers. I wonder, then, if this list was meant and forgetting some of the “25 things” from as a final-round check list that would show if Mrs. Janoff’s list we had given ourselves enough time to proof read? Either way, at the time it felt meanspirited to deduct points for small things when I did the “big” things pretty well. th We talked about this rule in 101. I can see that it was a way to help us develop the 8. In all of high school, we followed a 5 foundations of writing, and in high school it paragraph model for our writing seemed easy enough, but now it’s difficult to get used to another way of writing because it was so engrained in us. My thoughts are similar to the 5-paragraph 9. In all of high school writing, we were told rule. This gave us the tools for analysis, but it to follow the “CD/ANA/ANA” form for became such a rote habit that it’s harder now paragraphs – concrete detail followed by two for me to make choices about paragraphs now sentences of analysis that I have more freedom to develop my writing based on my argument and ideas 10. We were told not to use any web sources I think this was a rule meant to make us use for our research because they were likely the library. unreliable Part 3: Interpreting your analysis. 4. What overall themes or patterns do you initially see in your observation chart? In other words, how do you synthesize your analysis notes? There were a lot of rules about small things in middle- and high-school writing. Seeing them all in this list, it seems like they really depended on the teacher. A lot of them were meant to keep us from messing up hard things (not using semi-colons or commas if we weren’t sure). But other kinds of rules (5-par essay, CD/ANA/ANA form) were meant to develop skills. These skill- building rules were helpful at first, but when you get used to them they become rote and you forget their original purpose (if your teacher ever explained it in the first place). In college I find it hard to break away from these rules even though now I’m realizing they were only stepping stones on the way to more complex writing. I also notice the pattern that these rules affected me personally when I lost points for them. There seemed to be something unjust about losing points for small things when you did the more important things well. 5. Given those themes/patterns, what are three possible claims/theses you could make in your writer’s philosophy (MA#4)? 1. Rules shape writing into what the rule-creator wants, not what I valued as a writer. 2. Being forced to follow writing rules without explaining them made me less invested in my writing. 3. Rules can help teach writing basics but it’s important to know that rules change depending on who you’re writing for. 6. What new idea or point of view do those claims offer the perspective you’ve synthesized in MA#2? My perspective argues that rules limit what we’re able to write and how we can express ourselves. My claim adds to this but also emphasize how arbitrary rules can be in a classroom setting. My point of view is also different because I am a student and not a professor, like many of the people in my perspective.
This Report contains THREE PARTS – make sure to fill them out in the format below Part 1: Describing the evidence you will study. 1. What is your current research question? How does social media impact writing? 2. Why does this question matter to you? Social media is something I use often so I want to understand how it is influencing my writing in class and in other contexts 3. Describe what you will study. Fill out the answers to the appropriate table column and delete the other. Description Notes (pick one column) collection of evidence What are they? Concrete examples from my experience posting on social media in ways related to writing Why are they important? They show how I’ve used social media to write in more than one kind of social media app How do they fit into your question? It offers similar evidence as the authors in my perspective How will you select/sample from the collection fairly? I will focus on examples that relate most to the kinds of claims my perspective authors make Part 2: Analyzing your object/s of study. To closely analyze your object, make at least 10 concrete observations with 10 responses. Complete the chart below. After completing the chart, remember to also finish questions in Part 3 (new page). I recommend adding a page break after the table and deleting these instructions for best layout. Analysis Notes What I Observe/Remember (Concrete My Interpretations/Questions in Response Observations) Demonstrates the intersection of personal writing 1. Took a poll on Facebook of what to or activity on social media and my academic work. read for a summer project Also could be seen a a kind of brainstorming 2. Seeing a series of Tweets by people I follow on Twitter on “Gamergate” got me interested in women and gaming. I spent a few weeks using my free time to research more about this issue and learn more about. Though I didn’t do anything with it for school, it still shows how the “fluff” talked about on social media can encourage you to move beyond personal interests and learn more. Social media can be a place to figure out what you 3. Conversation with a few friends on want to say. Even if you have to write a formal, Facebook about the show The Walking academic paper, something as simple as a Dead helped me to write a paper for a conversation with friends online can help you fine communications class. tune your ideas and establish your argument. I think it is important that this blog was on graded on if you did it, not what you said it in. This gave us the space to explore our ideas and make mistakes 4. One of my high school teachers made without worrying about what it would mean for our us write on a class blog about the books grades. we read. Blogs can be seen as another kind of social media since they are online spaces where people often express their personal ideas 5. On the blog, he encouraged us to use By insisting that we use I, my teacher encouraged “I,” even though we weren’t able to use us to react to the books and give our own opinion. “I” in our papers. It made this writing personal, as well as academic. 6. He also insisted on the blog that we respond to each other at least twice. This part of the assignment also highlighted how social media and online spaces encourage communication. We can learn about ourselves online not only from what we write but how we respond to others and how they respond to our ideas. 7. Our teacher made us create our arguments for papers from our blog posts. Through this, our teacher showed me how personal writing and academic writing could be My Jane Eyre blog post helped me to interconnected, that one didn’t have to be separate come up with a paper on Jane Eyre and from the other. That they could build off each fairy tales that got me a good grade and other. made me see the book in a completely different way. Her writing showed me how much power personal writing has, and how even the most personal stuff, 8. One of my friends used Facebook as what some critics might call narcissistic, still has an a way to express her feelings when she important role, both for the writer and for readers was working through depression as well. I learned a lot about depression from her and many of our friends expressed feeling similarly. This example clearly demonstrates how what is so often seen as personal writing on social media can have other uses. By using Tweets to create thesis 9. A friend of mine told me that one of statements, my friend said her teacher forced them his English teachers makes them write to figure out what they had to say without any drafts of their thesis statements as “fluff” or extraneous writing. This shows a fluidity Tweets. between the kind of writing done on social media, which is so often seen as personal or even pointless, and more “serious” high brow forms of writing like academic writing. Shows how social media encourages different forms of “writing.” Though there were no words, my friend achieved a kind of self expression similar to 10. Many of my friends use selfies to document trips or events. For instance, the personal writing so often attributed to social one of my friends shared their sister’s media like Twitter and Facebook. We knew what wedding entirely through selfies from she wanted to tell us, but she used images and the rehearsal dinner all the way through expressions instead of words to tell the story. the end of the reception. She didn’t put captions on any of the pictures. Encourages us to think about how social media moves beyond writing to other forms of selfexpression. Part 3: Interpreting your analysis. 4. What overall themes or patterns do you initially see in your observation chart? In other words, how do you synthesize your analysis notes?   Personal writing is academic writing Personal writing and brainstorming 5. Given those themes/patterns, what are three possible claims/theses you could make in your writer’s philosophy (MA#4)? 1. I believe that the personal writing produced through these online spaces can be an important first step in the writing process, helping you to explore and fine-tune what you want to say. 2. I feel that “Narcissistic” writing can be seen as a valuable brainstorming activity rather than pointless “navel-gazing.” 3. Through these experiences, I argue that writing online helps me see myself as part of a community of writers. 6. What new idea or point of view do those claims offer the perspective you’ve synthesized in MA#2? I consider online writing as more than just Tweeting or Facebook status writing. Posting selfies is also a kind of “writing” where I develop ideas about myself. This adds to the other kinds of writing the perspective authors study.
Major Assignment #3: Evidence Gathering Assignment Introduction The previous assignment asked you to identify, analyze, and synthesize a significant response to a research question about writing. You have “listened in” and “reported back” on a conversation – focusing on the “They Say” side of good, rhetorical arguments. This third assignment – the Evidence Report – shifts focus. While you are probably already developing an “I Say” response to your question, this assignment will help you to find and analyze evidence from your own experience with writing so that you have concrete evidence to support your “I Say” claim. In other words, here you are asked to identify something about your own writing or from other people’s writing (if using interviews) that is meaningfully connected to your research question. You will then analyze this evidence closely and develop conclusions about what your experiential evidence reveals or argues. For example, Sherman Alexie describes how Superman comics helped him learn to write by specifically pointing to features such as the comic’s boxes and their connection to paragraphs. Like with the annotated bibliography assignment, this is a sophisticated type of note- taking rather than an essay. You will follow a note-taking template when you analyze your evidence and then reflect and identify a larger pattern or theme. The result will be a set of careful, focused notes. These, alongside your annotated bib, will help you to build your 4-5 page final essay: the writer’s philosophy. First Task: Discovering Evidence to Study Your first task is identifying something from your life that connects to your specific Writing Studies conversation and does so in a meaningful way. Adichie, for example, uses children’s books and her own experience. Because you will spend the rest of the semester focused on this evidence, choose something you find intriguing. But because you will use this to support your informed Writer’s Philosophy essay (MA#4), the evidence will also need to connect to your research question. In class we will brainstorm evidence, and part of your work will be exploring several possibilities. Second Task: Analyzing the Evidence By answering the questions in the Evidence Report form, you will analyze your evidence in a scholarly way. First, you will observe or remember concrete details from your evidence (a specific assignment from your 9th grade writing class, for example, or a quoted passage from your 5th grade journal). Then you will interpret those concrete observations in terms of your research question. (We will work on this in class together.). So after you finish your first set of observations and interpretations, you will need to figure out what line of inquiry merits further study and contributes to your unique research question. Then you can refocus and observe anew. Third Task: Identifying Larger Themes Once you have developed a rich analysis (and it will take several rounds of questions- observations-interpretations-questions), you will need to draw tentative conclusions about your evidence. In other words, you need to move from specific observations- interpretation pairs to larger patterns and themes. One way to think of this task is that you are synthesizing your findings, just as you synthesized the course readings. These themes will be tentative or preliminary because they are your starting place for the final assignment, MA#4’s Writer’s Philosophy Essay. You will revise the conclusions you reach in MA#3 in in later stages of the MA#4 drafting process. The task here is not to etch your conclusions in stone but rather to imagine possible arguments for your final essay. Fourth Task: Exploring Options In each above task, you explore multiple options before settling on a final focus for your Writer’s Philosophy’s essay. Keep nots on these explorations. You will turn in evidence showing how you explored and narrowed down your Evidence Report work to demonstrate how you revised during this project. Major 5 4 Proficient 3 Emerging 2 0 Assignment 3: Accomplished Paper Paper Marginal Absent Paper frequently occasionally Paper Not Enl-101 Ithoroughly demonstrates demonstrate demonstr enough Search demonstrates assessment s assessment ates some to criterion. criterion. attempt at assess. 50 points total assessment criterion. Content Goals 1. Evidence report’s part 1 includes completed questions. 2. Evidence report’s part 1 includes completed description notes. 3. Evidence report offers at least ten (10) concrete observations about student's experience with writing. 4. ...x2 for observation criteria. 5. Evidence report offers at least one (1) analysis and/or interpretation for each observation listed. 6. ... x2 for analysis/ interpretation. assessme nt criterion. Evidence report’s part 3 includes completed questions. Structural Goals 7. Report's prose is wellorganized for the reader. 8. Report's style, tone, and surface mechanics (syntax, grammar, spelling) follow academic expectations as well as conform to audience expectations and needs. LATE POINT DEDUCTIONS (from rough or final draft) Writing Process Task 9. Student demonstrates engagement in writing process (e.g.: exploration memo)
Evidence Report This Report contains THREE PARTS – make sure to fill them out in the format below Part 1: Describing the evidence you will study. 1. What is your current research question? 2. Why does this question matter to you? 3. Describe what you will study. Fill out the answers to the appropriate table column and delete the other. Description Notes (pick one column) single piece of evidence collection of evidence What is it? What are they? Why is this object worth studying and not another? Why are they important? How does it fit into your question? How do they fit into your question? How will you select/sample from the collection fairly? Part 2: Analyzing your object/s of study. To closely analyze your object, make at least 10 concrete observations with 10 responses. Complete the chart below. After completing the chart, remember to also finish questions in Part 3 (new page). I recommend adding a Analysis Notes What I Observe/Remember (Concrete Observations) My Interpretations/Questions in Response 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Part 3: Interpreting your analysis. 4. What overall themes or patterns do you initially see in your observation chart? In other words, how do you synthesize your analysis notes? 5. Given those themes/patterns, what are three possible claims/theses you could make in your writer’s philosophy? MA #3 Exploration and Revision Memo 1. Did you have an “I say” claim in mind before starting your MA#3? If so, what was it? 2. What other personal or anecdotal evidence did you consider before settling on the evidence in your final MA#3 assignment? Be specific. 3. How did your evidence/interpretation pairs (the Part 2 chart) change and develop after the first draft was due for homework? Be specific. Three Thesis Statements   

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