astronomy project my topic is; 22. Planet Four

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timer Asked: Apr 12th, 2017

Question Description

astronomy project my topic is; 22. Planet Four.

this is my last semester i m almost about to graduate

800 words so 3 to 4 pages i guess

please check attachment for complete details,


GSCI 1010 Instructor: Mauricio Argote-Cortes GSCI 1010 Report Citizen Science: What Is It And How Does It Work? For your Report, you are expected to write a 700-words document based on one of the Citizen Science Projects included at the end of this Document, plus a 100-words Executive Summary. Please, use the outline of expectations and grading, found on these Instructions to guide your work. Submit your original Report online, as a Word, PDF or compatible electronic text document, no later than midnight on the following date: April 6th, 2017. Report due date: Procedure By choosing one of the Science topics provided, you will explore the connection between some areas of Astronomical Research and new trends in crowd sourcing, known as Citizen Science Projects. You will need to relate the issue addressed on your selected citizen science project to the course materials, whether covered yet or not. I strongly recommend looking in the Course Outline and the textbook’s sections related to these topics. When you have selected your citizen science project, sign up for it no later than next week. You may do this by email, sending the project’s title and Internet address. Each student must have a different project, so you should select more than one in case someone else already got your first choice. YOU MUST HAVE THE PROJECT SELECTION APPROVED. Part I. Write a report on the approved article. The length of the main report should be about 700 words. Include the word count from your word processor at the top of your paper. Be sure to include ALL the following items: • An initial paragraph on your own internet research for what does citizen science mean and how does it work. Please, provide the appropriate references for the works cited here. • One to two paragraphs describing the main ideas of the project. What is the topic about? What is the aim of this project, in the context of the topic described? This must be in words and ideas you are comfortable with, not meaningless quotes or paraphrases from the website. • A paragraph on how this citizen science project relates to the course. Make sure to present your argument in dialogue with the materials of this course and the textbook. Discuss how the reported issue might enhance or challenge what we already know. • A paragraph where you raise a question about the topic addressed in the project, from your reading of the website’s introduction (a concept, term, reference to a procedure or equipment used that you do not understand). Use some other source, besides the FAQ pages of the project’s website; a textbook, a good dictionary, a glossary, a referenced item from the project or a web search item, etc., to support your response to the question raised. • A log of your participation on the project, from demonstrating your registration as a “member” of the project to the showcase of your completion of at least one task requested by the project website. Note that this showcase should address a task that goes beyond the initial tutorial/training given to new members. Please, include at least two screen shots (properly captioned) of the steps undertaken for those tasks and an outline describing these specific steps you made to accomplish the given tasks. If there were several measurements (images) taken, you can include them in a table/spreadsheet (this can be as an Appendix) with the corresponding identification and meaning within the context of the project. Figures and tables should not count towards your word-count of this report. Page 1 of 4 GSCI 1010 Instructor: Mauricio Argote-Cortes For the following item, consider your participation as a “test drive” given to the project and its website; you will not be only learning how the project works, but also you should provide a critical view of its “user experience”. • A paragraph where you raise a question or recommendation from your work as a member of the selected project, as a result of the critical view of its user experience mentioned before. You can address a trouble you found, an issue or item in the project that was not clear for you. Use the venues that the project website directs for questions and provides with answers (like FAQ pages or any Forum), in order to support how your question or concern has been addressed. You may need to contact other members or staff from your selected project. Very importantly: please be polite and patient; mostly a volunteer base runs many of these projects. • A statement about the value or significance of the project. How might the collective work for this project make a difference in our understanding of the universe or in our quality of life? How might the results of the project have an effect to our society, either at short or long term? Be specific. Broad generalizations are of little value and they will not give you the marks that correspond to this item in the rubric. • A paragraph on your personal reflection. It should thoughtfully connect what you know (or learned) based on the course content, the significance you described about the citizen science project and the possible effects that it may have for you. What could be the consequences associated with citizen science in general? How does it affect you in particular? Is there anything you gained from this experience that you would find useful somewhere else? • Include references to the original article, as well as from the sources used to answer your particular question. Cite your sources in APA style, and be consistent throughout your work. Read the guidelines on how to cite your sources at http://researchguides.georgebrown.ca/citingsources Remember: if you note it, quote it! Any report that shows evidence of plagiarism will automatically receive a mark of zero in addition to further disciplinary action in almost all cases, according to George Brown College’s policies in regards to academic dishonesty. Note that pleading ignorance will not do – it is your responsibility to review the information to avoid plagiarism provided by your library: http://www.georgebrown.ca/llc/studytools/plagiarism/ Part II. In addition to the pages for your report, include a front-page “Executive Summary” (100-150 words): Once your report is written, elaborate an Executive Summary. It has to condense what is important about the items addressed on the body of your report, within a couple of paragraphs. Make your case in this Executive Summary. It must be a fully self-contained, capsule description of the report that follows. It can't assume the reader into flipping through looking for an explanation of what is meant by some vague statement. It must make sense all by itself. Use the bullet points from Part I, as a checklist to guide you what key items should be considered in your executive summary. Despite the fact that an executive summary is quite brief, it may take as much work to prepare, and must imply almost as much work as the multi-page paper that follows it. In many situations people will make at least initial choices based on this information. Writing an efficient summary is hard work, but will repay you with a sense of increased impact by enticing people to read your work and follow your ideas and plans. Think of it as the “Abstract” that summarizes a Conference paper, or the “Cover-Letter” that you may include with the product to the company you are targeting for your client/employer… Page 2 of 4 GSCI 1010 Instructor: Mauricio Argote-Cortes Evaluation This report is worth 30% of your final grade. Your marks will be based on the details below: Elaboration Of Executive Summary, Including Key Items Description Of What Is Citizen Science, With Proper Citations Relation To Course Content, With Specific Topics Addressed Personal Question To Topic And Way To Address Its Solution Log Of Participation In Project User-Experience Analysis And Way To Address Its Solution Significance And Implications To Targeted Discipline And To Society Personal Reflection, Connecting Topic To Individual Experience And Addressing Key Questions Clarity & Readability. Grammar & Spelling. Timely Sign-Up Proper Citations And References. Total 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 2 2 30 Late Assignments If the report (worth 30% of the total course grade) is submitted past the due date, a late penalty of 3% per calendar day will be applied. This means that any submission that is ten days late will be marked as zero. The late penalty will be applied after the Rubric marks are assigned. Please, consider uploading the Report long before the time deadline (11:59pm). College servers tend to slow down close to midnight and this may impact negatively on your timely submission of the Report. Very often this results in failed uploads or they being delayed past midnight, in which case they get into the late-penalty status. Hence the warning! Page 3 of 4 GSCI 1010 Instructor: Mauricio Argote-Cortes Citizen-Science Project Sources (alphabetically ordered) You should select one of the projects from this list no later than the week after this assignment has been released. Email me your three best choices, in order of preference. The projects will be assigned on a “first-come, first-served” basis. 1. Asteroid Mappers: Vesta Edition https://cosmoquest.org/x/science/vesta/ 2. Backyard Worlds – Planet 9 https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/marckuchner/backyard-worlds-planet-9 3. Be A Martian: Virtual Explorer http://beamartian.jpl.nasa.gov/welcome 4. Comet Hunters https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/mschwamb/comet-hunters 5. Cyclone Center http://www.cyclonecenter.org/ 6. Dark Skies ISS http://crowdcrafting.org/project/darkskies/ 7. Disk Detective http://www.diskdetective.org 8. Galaxy Zoo https://www.galaxyzoo.org/ 9. Galaxy Zoo – 3D https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/klmasters/galaxy-zoo-3d 10. Globe At Night http://www.globeatnight.org/ 11. Globe Observer https://observer.globe.gov/ 12. Gravity Spy https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/gravity-spy 13. Higgs Hunters https://www.higgshunters.org/ 14. Lost at Night http://crowdcrafting.org/project/LostAtNight/ 15. Mars Mappers https://cosmoquest.org/x/science/mars/ 16. Mercury Mappers https://cosmoquest.org/x/science/mercury/ 17. Milky Way Project https://www.milkywayproject.org/ 18. Moon Mappers https://cosmoquest.org/x/science/moon/ 19. Muon Hunter https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/muon-hunter 20. Night Cities ISS http://crowdcrafting.org/project/nightcitiesiss/ 21. Picture Pile http://www.geo-wiki.org/games/picturepile/ 22. Planet Four https://www.planetfour.org/ 23. Planet Four: Ridges https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-ridges 24. Planet Four: Terrains https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains 25. Planet Hunters https://www.planethunters.org/ 26. Radio-galaxy Zoo https://radio.galaxyzoo.org/ 27. Radio Meteor Zoo https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/radio-meteor-zoo 28. SCOPE (Stellar Classification) http://scope.pari.edu/ 29. Space Warps https://spacewarps.org/ 30. Stardust @ Home http://stardustathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/ Page 4 of 4

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