2 pages lesson plan

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timer Asked: Apr 16th, 2017

Question Description

This assignment requires you to make connections between high-quality assessment and learning and innovation skills. Additionally, using the Framework for 21st Century learning as a resource, you will design a lesson plan representing program learning outcome 3, 4, 5, and 7. There are several approaches you could take with this assignment. For example, you may redesign an instructional plan with assessment plans embedded throughout or a full assessment plan including a summative assessment you may have constructed. These are just two ideas out of numerous possibilities. If you do not have previous assignments to use in this assignment, please contact your instructor for guidelines on how to proceed. Refer to the MAED Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) list as neededCreate your assignment to meet the content and written communication expectations below.

Learning and Innovation Skills and Student Assessment This assignment requires you to make connections between high-quality assessment and learning and innovation skills. Additionally, using the Framework for 21st Century learning as a resource, you will design a lesson plan representing program learning outcome 3, 4, 5, and 7. There are several approaches you could take with this assignment. For example, you may redesign an instructional plan with assessment plans embedded throughout or a full assessment plan including a summative assessment you may have constructed. These are just two ideas out of numerous possibilities. If you do not have previous assignments to use in this assignment, please contact your instructor for guidelines on how to proceed. Refer to the MAED Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) list as neededCreate your assignment to meet the content and written communication expectations below. Content Expectations The Redesign expectations explain what you are required to do with your redesign. The Summary expectations are for the separate written portion of this assignment. Redesign - Alignment and Mastery (1 Point): Redesign an instructional plan with assessment plans embedded throughout, or a full assessment plan as noted above including a summative assessment that could be selected to include alignment between specific skills, CCSS, and objectives and includes criteria for mastery. Redesign - Learning and Innovation Skills (1 Point): Redesign an instructional plan with assessment plans embedded throughout, or a full assessment plan as noted above including a summative assessment that could be selected to include specific learning and innovation skills from either/each of; creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving, and/or communication and collaboration. Summary – Introduction/Conclusion (1 Point): A one paragraph introduction to a summary that concisely presents the scope and organization of the summary writing, as well as a one paragraph conclusion that recaps your summary’s key points. Summary – Modification (1 Point): In one paragraph summarize the changes you made to your activity to meet the redesign expectations for this assignment. Explicitly state how your redesign assignment provides evidence of mastery of PLO’s 3, 5, and 7. Summary – Evaluation (1 Point): In one paragraph, evaluate how your assessment promotes Learning & Innovation Skills, assess how it could be used as a tool for ongoing evaluation of student progress, and evaluate how it could be used as a guide for teacher and student decision making. Summary – Reflection (1 Point): Summarize, in one paragraph, your experience with the redesign in terms of challenges you encountered and how you overcame those challenges. Written Communication Expectations Page Requirement (.5 points): Two to four pages, not including title and references pages. APA Formatting (.5 points): Use APA formatting consistently throughout the assignment. Syntax and Mechanics (.5 points): Display meticulous comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics such as spelling and grammar. Source Requirement (.5 points): References three scholarly sources in addition to the course textbook. All sources on the references page need to be used and cited correctly within the body of the assignment. PLO 3 Assessment for Learning in the 21st Century The MAED graduate designs a variety of evidence-based assessments used for ongoing evaluation of student progress, and to guide teacher and learner decision making. PLO 4 Leading Change through Research The MAED graduate executes an action research study that draws on the research and methods of various disciplines to address local or global educational issues. The MAED graduate designs learner-centered instruction aligned PLO 5 Dynamic Curriculum and Instruction in the 21st Century The MAED graduate designs learner-centered instruction aligned with Common Core State Standards, digital age standards (NETS-S), and 21st Century skills to promote learner achievement and growth. PLO 7 Content Knowledge The MAED graduate uses knowledge of subject matter and central concepts of the discipline(s) to create technology-enriched learning environments that promote learner achievement and innovation. Here is an example of how the lesson plan should be structured Welcome to week three and the debate on the role of critical thinking and problem solving in the classroom. We will be looking at high-quality assessments such as those used for constructed response. Here is an example of a Week Three Assignment: Framework for 21st Century Revision Introduction Assessment is a very important element of lesson planning. However, it is often overlooked or addressed as a second thought. There are a variety of reasons for this neglect. Designing assessments is a very time consuming process. Teachers don’t always have a say in what assessments are used either. These factors lead to a sort of apathy towards addressing assessment in the planning phase. However, it has come to light that assessment is not just a tool for the end of instruction. Assessment can and should be used during instruction as well. It provides teachers with valuable insight to student comprehension and progress as well as areas that may need to be adjusted during instruction for better comprehension. The lesson plan that follows demonstrates how this can be done. Kindergarten English Language Arts Unit Day 1: Short “A” Vowel Sound Learning Outcome: Students will be able to identify and produce words that use the short “A” vowel sound. This outcome aligns with the Common Core State Standard CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3.b “Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels,” (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2014). Materials Needed: The teacher will need a set of craft sticks with a single alphabet on each one, the set should contain one letter “A” and several consonants for each student, a worksheet that presents pictures and single syllable “A” sound words to be matched, and a series of large pictures of items that use either long or short “A” sounds. Introduction: The students will be introduced to the lesson via a teacher presenting items and pictures to the class that contain the short “A” sound such as an apple, ant, and an axe to demonstrate the concept. The teacher should make frequent pauses and encourage students to contribute to the discussion. This can be done by asking students what words they already know that use the short “A” sound. This lays a foundation for building and activating prior knowledge. The frequent pauses, encouragement of participation, and helping students establish prior knowledge are effective strategies for all students, and may be necessary for culturally diverse students. Procedure: Once the concept is introduced, the teacher will allow students to ask any questions they may have about the concept. She should also ask students to provide some examples in order to assess the students’ level of understanding. After this instruction, the class should move into small heterogeneous groups of two students. Each group will be instructed to use their craft sticks to build as many short “A” sound words as they can within the given time. One student from the group will act as the scribe and record each word that the group comes up with. The teacher will circulate throughout the classroom while observing the students and answering questions. At the end of the allotted time, the other student in the team will present the team’s list to the class orally. This is another opportunity for the teacher to informally assess the students’ grasp of the concept. Following this activity, the teacher will distribute the worksheet and assign it as homework for independent practice. This will conclude the lesson. Day 2: Long “A” Vowel Sound Learning Outcome: Students will be able to identify and produce words that use the long “A” vowel sound. This outcome aligns with the Common Core State Standard CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3.b “Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels,” (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2014). Materials Needed: The teacher will need a set of craft sticks with a single alphabet on each one. The set should contain one letter “A”, several consonants, and one letter “E” for each student. The teacher will also need a printable Long “A” mini book titled Long Vowel a With Jade (Mylet, n.d.) that students can cut out, put together, and color. Additionally, the teacher will need a worksheet that requires students to identify and circle words and pictures that contain the long “A” sound and items or images to present examples. Introduction: The teacher will introduce today’s lesson by recalling yesterday’s work with the short “A” sound. This activates prior knowledge. Then she will explain that the letter A also makes a different sound that is call the long vowel sound. The teacher should then verbally demonstrate the difference in the two phonetic sounds and provide some items and images as examples. Students will be invited and encouraged to raise their hands and contribute some of their own examples of words that contain this sound. This provides oral language practice for English language learner (ELL) students. Procedure: After the teacher has activated prior knowledge and introduced the lesson, she can direct the class into the craft sticks activity. This is the same activity as the previous day with the variation of phonics. The teacher should be clear in specifying the difference between the tasks. Demonstrating the new procedure is essential for the ELL students and those who may be struggling with phonetics concepts. Just as with the previous day’s craft stick learning activity, the teacher will circulate throughout the classroom to observe and assist students who need extra support. It is a good idea for the teacher to keep the same teams for this exercise and have the students swap roles from the previous day. Once the allotted time and team presentations are completed, the teacher should transition into a class learning activity with the mini books. Each student will receive a copy of the mini book. The teacher will have the class assemble the books together while demonstrating with a copy of the mini book. The class will participate in a read aloud of the assembled mini book. Students will then be directed to underline all of the long “A” sound words in the book independently. The teacher should circulate throughout the classroom again observing students and providing support to any students who need it. After this independent learning activity is completed, the teacher will review the mini book with the class by re-reading it and emphasizing the selections that should be underlined. The worksheet will be assigned as independent homework practice. Today’s lesson will close with the teacher asking students to take out a slip of paper and write down 3 words with the short “A” sound and 3 words that use the long “A” sound. Each piece of paper will be handed in when completed. This is a variation of the exit slip strategy. It is an informal assessment that is meant to spark critical reflection while providing insight to student comprehension. Day 3: Combine, Review, and Assessment Project Learning Outcome: Students will identify and produce words that use the short “A” sound as well as words that use the long “A” sound. Students will also be able to identify the difference by sorting the words into the correct phonetic category. These learning outcomes align with the Common Core State Standard CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3.b “Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels,” (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2014). Materials Needed: The teacher will need a SmartBoard and the Letter “A” Song video found on YouTube (Have Fun Teaching, 2010). Bingo cards with long and short “A” pictures in the squares and a list of the words on small slips of paper in a large bowl. A short story that contains both long and short “A” vowel sounds. Some blank paper for drawing and computer access for the students. Introduction: Today’s lesson is a review. So, the introduction should be brief. The teacher will remind students of the long “A” and short “A” sounds. The students will then be given the opportunity to ask any questions they may have about the concept. Procedure: Once the introductory review has ended, the teacher will instruct the students to signal with their right hand as she reads the story. When students hear a long “A” vowel sound, they will make an L with their thumb and index fingers. When they hear the short “A” sound, they will make a pinching motion with their thumb and index fingers. This is an informal assessment that allows linguistically diverse and/or learning challenged students to demonstrate their full range of understanding of the concept. Following this activity, the teacher will show the class the music video from YouTube. Following this, the class will play phonetic bingo with the students by distributing the bingo cards and randomly drawing the word slips from the bowl. This can be played for multiple rounds if necessary or desired in order to give multiple students the chance to win and more opportunities for practice. However, it should be kept relatively brief as the teacher will also provide materials, instructions, and work time for groups to work on their final assessment project. Moving into the assessment project, the teacher will divide the class into heterogeneous groups of four. Heterogeneous grouping for collaborative learning activities is a good strategy for supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students as well as those who may be struggling. It is important to note that collaborative learning is not a one way street for weaker learners and those with diverse needs to benefit. Students who possess strengths also have weaknesses. Collaborative group activities allow these students to share their strengths as well as build on their weaker skills. Additionally, collaborative learning helps to develop the classroom community that values diversity (Curtin University, 2014). After dividing the class into groups, the teacher should proceed with instructing the class on the final project. For the final project, each student of the group will have a specific job. One student will be the editor. The editor will be responsible for organizing the group’s work and insuring that everyone is on task. Two of the group’s members will be the illustrators. They will be responsible for creating and/or gathering the art work for the project. The fourth student will be the group’s scribe. The scribe is responsible for keeping notes and doing all of the project’s writing (on the computer). Once the jobs are assigned or selected at the teacher’s discretion, the teacher can give the class instructions for the assessment project. For this unit, the final project will be to have each group come up with a set of eight long and short “A” words by having each student contribute one of each. Once the group has recorded the list, they must write a story that incorporates each of the words. It is to be four pages long and have two illustrations that coincide with 2 typed pages. The story will recorded by the scribe and illustrated with the coordinating art provided by the group’s illustrators. The editor will proof read the story and make any necessary changes. Once the group had rendered a final draft, it will be presented to the class. Presentations may be done in a variety of ways. Groups may act out the story as it is read, divide the story into equal parts for each member of the group to read, or any other creative manner that the group decides upon. After the allotted work time, the lesson will be closed for the day. Day 4: Final touches, Presentation, and Assessment Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate mastery of the concept of the phonetic long and short “A” vowel sound by producing literary product based on words that fall into each category and by identifying the words in stories presented to them. Materials Needed: The teacher will need illustrated stories that have been created by the students as per the final project from the previous day. The teacher will also need a rubric (see the sample rubric below) with criteria that are specific to the learning outcomes listed for the unit as well as the final project criteria. Introduction: As this is day four and the culmination of this unit, no introduction is really necessary. Rather, the teacher should provide the students with about an hour to meet with their groups and put final touches on their projects. This should also be presented as an opportunity for groups to any last questions they may have or resolve any presentation issues. The teacher can accomplish this by circulating throughout the classroom and making herself available to any groups that have questions or concerns. After the allotted time has passed, the teacher can move into the final presentation. Procedure: Having given each group ample time to complete their final projects, the teacher will have the groups present their projects to the class. As each group presents their story, the rest of the class will use the hand signals (L with thumb and index fingers for long “A” words and a pinching motion with thumb and index fingers for the short “A” sound) from the previous day’s review. The teacher should observe the class to check for understanding as well as the presenters. She should also be taking notes as to whether each group’s presentation meets the criteria set forth in the rubric. Since each presentation will be uniquely creative, the teacher should insure that enough time is allotted for each group to perform its presentation without being rushed. Depending on the size of the class, this may take more than one day of presentations to get through each group. Following the completion of all the presentations, the teacher will meet with each group and have a conference about the process that was followed, whether each group has met each of the rubric’s prescribed criteria, and discuss where improvements could be made. The following rubric is an example of what criteria should be included. Not Proficient Approaching Proficiency Proficient Exceeds Proficiency Overall Presentation 10% The group did not include any contextual illustrations or cohesive story in the presentation. The group included 3 contextual illustrations or cohesive story in the presentation. The group included at least 4 contextual illustrations or cohesive story in the presentation. The group included more than 4 contextual illustrations or cohesive story in the presentation. Use four words with the short “A” vowel sound 35% The group did not use more than one word with the short “A” vowel sound in the presentation. The group used at least 3 words with the short “A” vowel sound in the presentation. The group used 4 words with the short “A” vowel sound in the presentation. The group used more than 4 words with the short “A” vowel sound in the presentation. Use four words with the long “A” vowel sound 35% The group did not use more than one word with the long “A” vowel sound in the presentation. The group used at least 3 words with the long “A” vowel sound in the presentation. The group used 4 words with the long “A” vowel sound in the presentation. The group used more than 4 words with the long “A” vowel sound in the presentation. Collaborative Speaking and Sharing (Teamwork) 20% The group members did not work as a team or less than 3 of the 5 members contributed to the project and worked together in order to accomplish a common goal. At least 3 of the 5 members of the group contributed to the project and worked together to accomplish a common goal. 4 of the 5 group members contributed to the project and worked together in order to accomplish a common goal. All 5 members of the group contributed equally to the project and worked together in order to accomplish a common goal. Modification This lesson plan was modified to incorporate technology and innovative multimedia content in order to align with the Framework for 21st Century Learning. Additionally, these modifications aligned with Ashford University’s Master of Arts in Education program outcomes 3, 5, and 7 (Ashford University, 2014). This was accomplished by incorporating evidence-based assessments, aligning instruction with Common Core State Standards (CCSS), digital age standards, and 21st Century skills. Specifically, evidence-based assessment is present throughout the lesson plan. The teacher can check student progress daily and adjust as necessary with the multiple assessment opportunities strategically placed throughout the plan. The learning objectives are clearly stated in the form of CCSS listed. Each day’s lesson explicitly teaches that content in a variety of formats that address a diverse array of learner needs. Digital age standards and innovative are combined with central concept and content knowledge through the addition of multimedia to convey content, collaborative learning opportunities, and the use of technology to complete collaborative a learning project that foster’s appreciative awareness of and the ability to work with diverse members of the learning community as a team member. When students participate in this type of authentic project learning, diverse learning communities come together to discuss and exchange ideas (Burnaford& Brown, 2014). Evaluation The assessment strategies that were implemented in this lesson promote Learning and Innovation Skills in a variety of ways. One way that this is accomplished is the use of the variation on exit slips that builds students’ critical thinking skills. This prompt to reflect on the content that was learned in the day’s lesson sparks students to expand their learning via the critical thought process to produce the knowledge acquired. Creativity and innovation are addressed in the summative assessment project that requires students to produce the newly acquired knowledge in a uniquely creative manner that incorporates the creation of graphic and literary art. Finally, communication and collaboration are required to complete the summative assessment as it is a collaborative learning project that requires individual input from each member of the team in explicitly defined roles. This addresses each component of the Learning and Innovation Skills portion of the Framework for 21st Century Learning. Conclusion In concluding this examination of how assessment is such an important element of lesson planning, it is clear that assessment serves teachers in a variety of capacities. Throughout the sample lesson plan, there were multiple types of assessment used. Each of them was a unique manner in which the teacher could gain insight to student comprehension and progress. Some of the methods of assessment were simple and only required observation of the students. Other assessment strategies incorporated writing skills that sparked critical thinking on the students’ part and provided evidentiary feedback to the teacher as to student progress. The final and summative assessment was formal in nature. This allowed the teacher to observe and record specific evidence of student progress that demonstrated mastery of the learning objective as well as teacher effectiveness. Reflection In reflection, this redesign of the lesson plan was not as difficult to complete as previous redesign assignments. It was still a challenge to insure that all the required components were addressed. However, this challenge was of a more time consuming nature than difficulties with planning strategies. Having had two previous opportunities to practice this skill set, this assignment was an opportunity to incorporate the knowledge that was acquired thus far into a more refined product. While there is always room for improvement, this goal was accomplished with the details that were incorporated. For example, a completed rubric to evaluate the criteria required in the summative assessment was an element that had not been incorporated in previous redesigns. Overall, this was a challenging and interesting learning experience.

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