easy animation

Anonymous
timer Asked: May 2nd, 2017

Question description

here are 2 files tells you what I want ,

I want the result 2 files not one.

Animate Animation 1 Overview Animate is a software package that allows you to create projects called movies. A movie is much like what you go to see in a movie theater. It is composed of one of morescenes. A scene can be considered a small, self-contained movie and is comparable to a chapter in a book. Our first movie will be a simple movie showing a sunrise and an airplane flying across the sky. Each scene consists of several frames. A frame is one single picture within a scene. Playing frames in rapid succession gives the human eye the illusion of constant motion. A keyframe is a frame where the action of your object changes significantly. Example: a plane flies across the screen from left to right. Keyframe number one in this case would be the frame where the plane starts on the left side of the screen, keyframe number two in this case would be the frame where the plane stops on the right side of the screen. In addition to frames, each scene can be made of different layers. To understand the concept of layers, think of a stack of transparencies. You can place different objects of your scene on separate transparencies (layers). To see the complete scene, you would then look at all the transparencies together stacked up. This is essentially the concept of layers. It is recommended to place each object on a separate layer. This practice will make manipulating (animating) your objects much easier. Objects are also called symbols. Symbols are those objects which make up your scene. Symbols are objects that are stored in your movie's library for reuse. Symbols can easily be reused and/or modified. Symbols can be added to the library by the user. Each layer has a timeline which shows how the symbols on the layer change over the course of the scene. The amount of time your movie is showing depends on the total number of frames you define. Our movie will also contain some basic animation. To animate an object, you define two or more keyframes (frames where the action changes significantly). Between those keyframes are several frames which show the transition between those keyframes. This transition can be generated using Animate. The process of transition is calledtweening. Tweening is a Animate function which determines the best way to transfer an object from one keyframe to the next. Our first movie will be an animation showing a nature scene. We will create a movie showing the sun rise and a cloud flying in the sky. The movie will also have credits which show who created this movie. This movie will have one scene, 40 frames and four layers. Procedure 1. Use Start / Programs / Adobe Animate to start Animate. Select Create / New/ ActionScript 3.0.To ensure that all controls are shown on the screen, select View / Magnification / Show All, and select View/Preview Mode/Full. The properties window should show to the right of your screen by default. If you don't see this window, select Window / Properties to open it. 2. Animate has a dialog box called Document Properties that allows you to change the main characteristics of your movie. The default background for each movie is white. Our movie will show the sky, so we would like to change the color of the background to blue. Select Modify / Document and in the dialog box that appears, click on theStage Color button. In the 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. color palette that then appears, click on a light blue shade for your background. Then click OK. Create a sun. To help with this step, refer to the picture above. To make your sun, select the oval tool. Use it to drag out a medium sized circle in the lower left portion of the stage (for a perfect circle, hold the shift key while you draw the circle). To fill your circle, choose the Paint Bucket tool in the Toolbox . Select the sun first (left-click once), then in the color palette that appears, choose an appropriate color for your sun (a shade of orange works well). Once you release the mouse pointer the sun should have the color you selected. Animate your sun. Select the Pointer Tool in the upper right corner of the Drawing Toolbox. Select all of the sun (the interior and the outline) by drawing a rectangle around the sun. Next, choose Insert / Classic Tween. Animate converts your sun automatically to a symbol (placing it in the library). Define the final position of your sun. Click directly under the timeline in frame 40, the final frame of our animation. We want to use 40 keyframes to make the sun rise from the lower left to the upper right. This means that in frame 40, the sun will be in its final position, at the upper right of the screen. Choose Insert / Timeline / Keyframeto make this a keyframe. Notice the solid arrow between frame 1 and frame 40 signifying a successful motion tween. Now we move the sun to its position in frame 40. With frame 40 still selected, single click on your sun to select it and drag it to its final position in the upper right area of the stage. Change the color of your sun. Note that unlike a real sunrise, your sun does not change color as it rises. In this step, you will make your sun change color as it rises. Select frame 1, click on your sun once to select it. In the Properties Window (to the right of the stage) in the color effect list select Tint. In the color selection square (right next to Tint) select a shade of yellow for your sun. You can adjust the sliders until your sun has your desired shade of yellow. Play your animation to see your sun change color as it rises! Make sure to un-select your sun by clicking anywhere on the canvas outside of the sun. Let's check our animation. To play your animation, choose Control / Rewind then Control / Play. Adjust the path of the sun. When we played the movie we noticed that the sun is taking a straight path from the lower left to the upper right. We would like to curve the path a little. Click on the timeline in frame 20. Animate now shows you the sun in the position in frame 20. Drag the sun a little further up. Animate now shows a bullet in this frame, meaning that it now designed this frame as a new keyframe. Control / Rewind and Control / Play your movie again. Add a few more keyframes to make the path look like a curve. 8. Save your project on your disk. To do this, choose File / Save As, navigate to your disk and give your movie the name MyMovie.fla, then click the Save button. 9. Add another object (cloud) to your movie. Since we want to animate our new object we will place the new object on its own layer. To insert a new layer, choose Insert / Timeline / Layer. Note that this new layer, called Layer 2, is at the top of the list of layers. This means that objects in Layer 2 will appear on top of objects in Layer 1. If necessary, you can rearrange the ordering of the layers (called the stacking order) in a scene. The name of the currently active layer is indicated in bold face and in this case is Layer 2. You can change the active layer by clicking on the name of the layer and dragging this layer to the bottom of the layer list. Try this a few times but leaveLayer 2 as the active layer when you are done. 10. Create a cloud to fly across the sky. Create a new layer for the cloud. Our keyframes for each layer will be again frame 1 and frame 40. Make sure that layer 2 is the active layer (click on it if necessary). Draw a cloud on the left, upper side of the stage. 11. Animate your cloud. Select the Pointer Tool in the upper left corner of the Drawing Toolbox. Select all of the cloud (the interior and the outline) - be careful now that there are other objects in other layers, it may be better to select our cloud by double-clicking on it instead of drawing a rectangle around the cloud. Next, choose Insert / Classic Tween. Animate converts your cloud automatically to a symbol (placing it in the library). 12. Define the final position of your cloud. Click directly under the timeline in frame 40, the final frame of our animation. We want to use 40 keyframes to let the cloud fly across the sky. This means that in frame 40, the cloud will be in its final position. Choose Insert / Timeline / Keyframe to make this a keyframe. Notice the solid arrow between frame 1 and frame 40 signifying a successful motion tween. Now we move the cloud to its position in frame 40. With frame 40 still selected, single click on your cloud to select it and drag it to its final position towards the right portion of the stage. 13. Change the stacking order. Drag the bar labeled Layer 1 up into the position where the bar labeled Layer 2 is. Again rewind and play your movie and note the changes. 14. Add credits that show the creator of this wonderful movie! Insert a new layer by selecting Insert / Timeline / Layer. Layer 3 should now be your active layer. Select frame 20 of layer 3 to be your first keyframe. Click on frame 20, then select Insert / Timeline / Keyframe. In the Toolbox, choose the text tool. In the Properties Window, select Font and set the font to Arial. Set the text size to 18 and the text style to Italics. Make sure the properties box shows static text. Click somewhere in the lower half of the stage and type three lines of text: This fantastic movie was created by Joe Student (replace with your name) COSC 109 section M 8 am (replace with your section) 15. Now click on frame 40 for layer 3, then select Insert / Timeline / Keyframe. Our text will not move, it is just required to stay on the screen from frame 20 to frame 40. Rewind and play your movie. Should you need to delete any frames, you can do so by right-clicking on the frame(s) to remove, then select Remove Frames. 16. Add one additional object. Improve the movie by adding an additional object, for example, a bird, or a kite. Insert an additional layer. Place an object of your choice on this layer towards the top of the screen. The object can be any item of your choice. Make this item move from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen. 17. Save your movie. Select File/Save As, select Save as Type: Animate Document (*.fla). For a file name, type anim1. 18. All Done! Grading Criteria • • • • • • Movie must contain 4 layers Layer 1 contains the sun moving from the lower left to the upper right corner of the screen, sun must change color Layer 2 contains the cloud moving from the left area of the screen to the right area of the screen Layer 3 contains your credits and must start after the cloud has moved some Layer 4 contains an object of your choice moving from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen Movie must be posted in .swf format
Animate Animation 2 Overview In this lab assignment we will create a movie with several scenes. We will also introduce two new features of Animate: animated masking and shape tweening (morphing). Masks reveal a portion of an underlying image as the mask moves across the stage or on a path. We will use a mask with our digital photo to create a spotlight effect, where the spotlight focuses on one part of the photo. Shape tweening (morphing) seamlessly transforms one object into another object. To produce the credits, we will use a technique known as morphing. Morphing is a function which automatically transforms shapes. The movie will have 2 scenes and the first scene will have several layers. The first scene uses the masking technique, the second scene uses shape tweening. The instructions for this exercise are more "general" than in our first animation lab. If you are looking for exact directions, please refer to our "Animation 1" lab. Material: A digital photo that you have available to you. The photo should show you (and possibly friends and/or family). Macromedia Animate Procedure 1. Use Start / Programs / Adobe Animate to start Animate. Select Create / New/ ActionScript 3.0. To ensure that all controls are shown on the screen, select View / Magnification / Show All, and select View/Preview Mode/Full. The properties window should show to the right of your screen by default. If you don't see this window, select Window / Properties to open it. 2. Check out the sample animation that is posted in the LearnOnline discussion board under "Animation 2". It will give you an idea what the final product will look like. 3. Let's look at our first scene, our spotlight using the masking. The first scene will have at least 4 layers. o Layer 1 (of scene 1) features our digital photograph with dimmed brightness setting o Layer 2 (of scene 1) contains our digital photograph with regular brightness setting o Layer 3 (of scene 1) is our mask layer, it contains a circle to function as the spotlight o Layer 4 (of scene 1) shows text to explain our animated mask The total length of your movie will be appr. 120 frames for the first two scenes. 4. Create background. First, you create layer 1 (of scene 1) which is the background for the movie. This layer contains the "dimmed" photograph. We will reduce the brightness to a low level. Use File / Import to Stage to import the photograph. Navigate to the location of the photograph and select it. You may have to adjust the size of the photograph by using the Modify / Transform / Scale option. Drag one of the corner handles to adjust the size. 5. Reduce Brightness. To reduce the brightness, the photograph needs to be converted to a symbol. Use Modify / Convert to Symbol (if you don't see the Convert to Symbol right-click on your image, then select Convert to Symbol from the shortcut menu) to turn this photo into a symbol and store it in the movie's library. Save this symbol as a Graphic. In the dialog box that appears, name your symbol "photograph". Click Ok. Select the drop-down box for the color effect in the properties window, and select Brightness. Adjust the slider to the right to a value around -70%. This adjusts the brightness for this instance of the symbol "photograph". 6. Define length of scene 1. This layer should end at frame 60 (hint: Insert / Timeline / Keyframe at frame 60). 7. Label layer. Once a scene contains a number of layers it is usually easier when layers are labeled appropriately. For example, "Background" instead of "layer 1". To label your layer, double-click on the layer name and enter a name of your choice. 8. Create second layer. The next step will create the second layer (of scene 1) containing the picture that will show through the spotlight. Insert a new layer using Insert / Timeline / Layer. Label the layer by double-clicking on the writing "layer 2". You can now replace the default name "layer 2" with your own description. Name this layer "regular photograph". 9. Use the photograph symbol from the library . This will be a second instance of the the symbol "photograph" and we won't change the brightness this time. Click in frame 1 of the second layer. Use Window / Library to bring up the movie's library window. Select the symbol "photograph" by clicking on it (make sure to select the "graphic" one). Now drag the symbol from the library window directly onto the stage. This new instance should fit exactly on top of the dimmed photograph. This layer should also end at frame 60. 10. Create third layer. Insert the third layer using Insert / Timeline / Layer. This is the layer for our spotlight mask. Label the layer appropriately. Using the circle tool, draw a circle of appr. 1 inch diameter on the left side of the photograph. This will be our spotlight. Make sure that the circle has an actual fill color, don't use an "empty" circle. 11. Animate the spotlight. Click in frame 1 of layer 3 and select Insert / Classic Tween 12. Define final location for spotlight. Left-click once in frame 60 in layer 3, and select Insert / Timeline / Keyframe. Drag the circle to the particular item of your photo that you want to show in the spotlight. You should now see a solid arrow pointing from the first keyframe to the last keyframe in layer 3. If you see any part of a dotted line, that indicates an incomplete or broken motion tween, and your spot light may not work as expected. 13. Enlarge the spotlight. Modify / Transform / Scale. Drag one of the corner handles to enlarge the circle. 14. Check your movie. Select Control / Play all Scenes, select Control / Rewind, then select Control / Play and check the path of your circle. You can adjust the path of your circle now. If you like, have your spotlight move around the photograph before it zooms in on the object of your choice (as of now we should see a filled circle moving around on our photograph). 15. Mask Layer. Before you mask the layer, you want to make sure that your spotlight is exactly the way you want it. After masking the layer, the masked layer and the mask will be locked and you will have to unlock the layers first to make any changes. To mask the layer, right-click in layer 3 (the layer containing the spotlight) and choose Mask. Now the masking layer (layer 3) covers (masks) everything in the underlying layer (layer 2) that is outside of the masking shape. 16. If your spotlight does not work as expected: If your motion tween is incomplete or incorrect and/or your spotlight does not work as expected, it is easiest to re-do the whole process. Unlock the masked layers, unmask the layers, then delete the spotlight layer and start over by re-inserting the layer. 17. Add Text. Add a fourth layer, label it appropriately and write text to illustrate your animation. The text needs to include your full name. For example, you could write: Introducing...........Joe Student (replace Joe Student with your own name). 18. Finished with our First Scene!! 19. Create second scene. The next step is our second scene, the credit scene. In this scene we will use a new technique called morphing. We will show credits as: This movie was produced by: and have these words then automatically transform into our name. Add a new scene to your movie using Insert / Scene. 20. Create credits. Use the text tool to write some text on the screen. Make sure to change the text color to something different than white so that it will be visible on the white background. Text should be similar to: "Movie produced by:" (don't write your name). In the Properties window, select a large font. Switch to editing mode by clicking on the arrow tool. Select Modify / Break Apart. Select Modify / Break Apart again. (Yes, it's correct, you use the modify / break apart command twice) The break apart command converts text to a shape by separating your block of text into small editable objects. 21. Insert a blank keyframe at frame 40 using Insert / Timeline / Blank Keyframe. This inserts a blank keyframe without any content. Use the text tool to type your name anywhere on the canvas. Select a large font and any color of your choice. Switch to editing mode by clicking on the arrow tool. Select Modify / Break Apart. Select Modify / Break Apart again. De-select the text by clicking anywhere on the canvas. 22. Shape Tween the text. We will now instruct Animate to compute the in-between stages for the transformation of the two text items that we placed on the screen. Transforming from one shape into another is called morphing. Click on frame 1, select Insert/Shape Tween. Notice the solid arrow from frame 1 to frame 40 signifying a successful shape tweening. 23. Insert an additional keyframe at frame 60 using Insert / Timeline / Keyframe. This will display your name in its final position for a few seconds (this will give me time to read your name). 24. The total length of your movie including the two scenes should be around 120 frames. If you need to switch between scene 1 and scene 2, would like to change the order of your scenes or delete a scene, use the inspector under Window / Scene. 25. Check your work. Control / Rewind and Control / Play your movie. Save your file using the File / Save As option and name your movie anim2.fla. Remember, you need the movie in native .fla format if you would like to make any changes at a later time. 26. Export your movie for posting. Select Control / Play All Scenes (to show all scenes of your movie), select Control / Rewind (to make sure your movie starts from the beginning), select Control / Loop Playback (this option will continuously play your movie). Now we are ready to export the movie to Animate Player format. Select File / Export Movie. In Save as Type, select SWF and select type (*.swf), as file name type anim2. 27. You should now have two files saved, anim2.fla and anim2.swf. Grading Criteria For full credit 20 points: • • • • Movie must contain 2 scenes in total Scene 1 contains the digital picture with spotlight (using mask layer) Scene 2 contains your credits (must be shape tweened) Movie must be posted in .swf format

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