History - Initial development

Jun 17th, 2015
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It had earlier been recognized by Plücker in 1858 that the deflection of "cathode rays" (electrons) was possible by the use of magnetic fields. This effect had been utilised to build primitive cathode ray oscilloscopes (CROs) as early as 1897 by Ferdinand Braun, intended as a measurement device.

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History[edit] Initial developmentSketch of first Electron microscope, originally from Ruska's notebook in 1931, capable of only 16 times magnificationErnst Abbe originally proposed that the ability to resolve detail in an object was limited by the wavelength of the light used in imaging, thus limiting the useful obtainable magnification from an optical microscope to a few micrometers. Developments into ultraviolet (UV) microscopes, led by Koehler, allowed for an increase in resolving power of about a factor of two. However this required more expensive quartz optical components, due to the absorption of UV by glass. At this point it was believed that obtaining an image with sub-micrometer information was simply impossible due to this wavelength constraint.It had earlier been recognized by Plcker in 1858 that the deflection of "cathode rays" (electrons) was possible by the use of magnetic fields.[2] This effect had been utilised to build primitive cathode ray oscilloscopes (CROs) as early as 1897 by Ferdinand Braun, intended as a measurement device.[3] Indeed in 1891 it was recognized by Riecke that the cathode rays could be focused by these magnetic fields, allowing for simple lens designs. Later this theory was extended by Hans Busch in his work published in 1926, who showed that the lens maker's equation, could under appropriate assumptions, be applicable to electrons.[4]The first practical TEM, Originally installed at I. G Farben-Werke and now on display at th

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