ESL Learners’ Expressions of Disagreement Karen Kreutel

Jun 21st, 2015
Studypool Tutor
Alabama State University
Price: $25 USD

Tutor description

In recent years, increasing emphasis has been put on pragmatic competence as part of foreign language curricula. This article analyzes the devices used by learners of English as a Second Language (ESL) in order to perform the speech act of disagreement in their L2. Data from 27 ESL learners were gathered by means of Discourse Completion Tests and compared to baseline data from 27 native speakers of American English. It was found that non-native speakers use mitigational devices such as hedges or explanations less frequently than native speakers, but often resort to undesirable features such as the “blunt opposite” or message abandonment. Moreover, three additional features of target-like disagreement expression were identified, namely, suggestions, exclamations, and a “sandwich pattern of mitigation.” The data suggest that high lexico-grammatical proficiency does not necessarily imply high pragmatic competence. The findings are discussed in light of Wolfson’s Bulge Theory, and teaching i

Word Count: 9073
Showing Page: 1/22
Im not agree with you. ESL Learners Expressions of DisagreementKaren KreutelChemnitz University of Technology, GermanyAbstractIn recent years, increasing emphasis has been put on pragmatic competence as part of foreign language curricula. This article analyzes the devices used by learners of English as a Second Language (ESL) in order to perform the speech act of disagreement in their L2. Data from 27 ESL learners were gathered by means of Discourse Completion Tests and compared to baseline data from 27 native speakers of American English. It was found that non-native speakers use mitigational devices such as hedges or explanations less frequently than native speakers, but often resort to undesirable features such as the blunt opposite or message abandonment. Moreover, three additional features of target-like disagreement expression were identified, namely, suggestions, exclamations, and a sandwich pattern of mitigation. The data suggest that high lexico-grammatical proficiency does not necessarily imply high pragmatic competence. The findings are discussed in light of Wolfsons Bulge Theory, and teaching implications are discussed.IntroductionWith the advent of the communicative approach to language teaching, the concept of communicative competence gained increasing attention from both language teachers and language acquisition researchers. This change in perspective entails, among other factors, a widen

Review from student

Studypool Student
" Thanks for the help. "
Ask your homework questions. Receive quality answers!

Type your question here (or upload an image)

1830 tutors are online

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors